A beautiful New York model and socialite and enjoys a very active night-life, but all things change when she falls for a married man and the consequences are tragic.

Director:

Daniel Mann

Writers:

John O'Hara (novel), Charles Schnee (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Won 1 Oscar. Another 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Elizabeth Taylor ... Gloria Wandrous
Laurence Harvey ... Weston Amsbury Liggett
Eddie Fisher ... Steve Carpenter
Dina Merrill ... Emily Liggett
Mildred Dunnock ... Mrs. Wandrous
Betty Field ... Mrs. Francis Thurber
Jeffrey Lynn ... Bingham Smith
Kay Medford ... Happy
Susan Oliver ... Norma
George Voskovec ... Dr. Tredman
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alex Mann Alex Mann ... Extra
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Storyline

Gloria Wondrous awakens in a luxurious bedroom that's not hers. She swallows a jolt of distilled courage, tosses aside $250 left by an admirer, leaves a scornful reply in lipstick on the mirror, dials her service for messages and slips into a mink coat she finds in the closet. The day and the movie are off to a roaring start. Moviegoers and Hollywood left a message of "Hurrah!" for Elizabeth Taylor and Butterfield 8. Audiences made the film, co-starring Laurence Harvey and Eddie Fisher as a married lover and platonic friend who matter to Gloria, a box-office hit. And Taylor won her first Best Actress Academy Award as a woman whose life comes with a complete set of emotional baggage. For a glossy, good time, don't call. Watch.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

...if a woman answers don't hang up!...because it might be Gloria, whose passions came wrapped in mink! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Production of this movie was prolonged due to the Screen Actors Guild strike from March 7 to April 18, 1960. See more »

Goofs

During the car chase, there are cars driving behind Liggett, visible through the rear window from inside the car. When the shot changes to a view of both cars on the highway, there is no one behind him. See more »

Quotes

Weston Liggett: I've been kind of busy.
Man: Yeah, I heard. I heard. That's the kind of busy-ness I wouldn't mind having - again!
Weston Liggett: What are you talking about?
Man: Oh, come on, Ligget, come on! Hunh? Gloria!
[Puts his arm around him]
Man: Hunh? Sure! Oh, she's... she's frantic! Isn't she like a rocket right off the Earth? Who should know better than yours truly? Ooohhh, mother, help me! I'd have left home for that. Nah... she's got a traveling itch; she's like a flea. Hop, hop, hop from one dog to another. She bites you, and she's...
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Connections

Referenced in Elizabeth Taylor: A Tribute (2011) See more »

User Reviews

A Blazing Performance
20 August 2003 | by MGMboySee all my reviews

`The most desirable girl in town is the easiest to find. Just call Butterfield-8!' So trumpeted the posters of this, Elizabeth Taylor's first Oscar winning performance. The film is a modernization of the 1935 novel by John O'Hara, which was based on the real life of the 1920's New York City call girl Starr Faithful.

Miss Taylor was dead set against playing Gloria Wandrous. She felt was a deliberate play by M.G.M. to capitalize on her recent notoriety in the Liz-Eddie-Debbie scandal. Also, she was anxious to move on to her first ever million-dollar role in Fox's Cleopatra. She was told by M.G.M that if she did not fulfill her contractual obligation to her home studio for one final film on her eighteen year contract that she would be kept off the screen for two years and miss making Cleopatra all together. She swore to the producer Pandro S. Berman that she would not learn her lines, not be prepared and in fact not give anything more and a walk through. Mr. Berman knew her better than she suspected. In the end Elizabeth Taylor turned in a professional, classic old style Hollywood performance that ranks at the top with the best of her work. She brings a savage rage to live to her searing portrait of a lost girl soaked through with sex and gin. A woman hoping against all hope to find salvation in yet one last man. Weston Leggett, a man who is worse off than she is in the self-esteem department. In her frantic quest for a clean new life Gloria finds that the male establishment will not allow her to step out of her role as a high priced party girl. She is pigeon holed by her past and the narrow mores of the late 50's are not about to let her fly free. Not the bar-buzzards of Wall Street, not her best friend Steve who abandons her at his girlfriend's insistence. Not even her shrink Dr. Treadman believes in her. The three women in her life are blind to who she really is. Her mother will not admit what Gloria has become. Mrs. Thurber will not believe she can ever change and Happy, the motel proprietor is too self involved in her own past to care who Gloria is She is the dark Holly Golightly and this is the lurid red jelled Metro-Color Manhattan that is the flip side of Billy Wilder's The Apartment (also 1960). Wilder's New York is cynical. Liz's tony East Side phone exchange rings only one way, the hard way. This New York is dammed. Recrimination and death are Gloria's final tricks, and she goes out in a melodramatic blaze that Douglas Sirk might have envied in place of his usually unsettling, unconvincing happy endings. In the end we have a bravura performance by the last true star of the old system. Yes she deserved the Oscar more for `Cat'. Yes it was given to welcome her back from the brink of death in London. And even Shirley MacLaine's lament on Oscar night, `I lost the Oscar to a tracheotomy.' can not diminish this must see performance by Miss Taylor.

In what one could call a perfect example of what an `Oscar scene' is all about she says it all. `I loved it! Every awful moment of it I loved. That's your Gloria, Steve. That's your precious Gloria!' She gave it to us with both barrels blazing, and Metro, and Berman be dammed.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 November 1960 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Butterfield 8 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,800,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Afton-Linebrook See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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