In 1953, an innocent man named Christopher Emanuel "Manny" Balestrero is arrested after being mistaken for an armed robber.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Maxwell Anderson (screenplay), Angus MacPhail (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Henry Fonda ... Christopher Emanuel 'Manny' Balestrero
Vera Miles ... Rose Balestrero
Anthony Quayle ... Frank D. O'Connor
Harold J. Stone ... Det. Lt. Bowers
Charles Cooper ... Det. Matthews
John Heldabrand John Heldabrand ... Tomasini - Prosecutor
Esther Minciotti ... Mama Balestrero
Doreen Lang Doreen Lang ... Ann James
Laurinda Barrett Laurinda Barrett ... Constance Willis
Norma Connolly Norma Connolly ... Betty Todd
Nehemiah Persoff ... Gene Conforti
Lola D'Annunzio Lola D'Annunzio ... Olga Conforti - Manny's Sister
Kippy Campbell Kippy Campbell ... Robert Balestrero
Robert Essen Robert Essen ... Gregory Balestrero
Richard Robbins ... Daniel - the Guilty Man
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Storyline

Christopher Emanuel Balestrero, "Manny" to his friends, is a string bassist, a devoted husband and father, and a practicing Catholic. His eighty-five dollar a week gig playing in the jazz combo at the Stork Club is barely enough to make ends meet. The Balestreros' lives will become a little more difficult with the major dental bills his wife Rose will be incurring. As such, Manny decides to see if he can borrow off of Rose's life insurance policy. But when he enters the insurance office, he is identified by some of the clerks as the man that held up the office twice a few months earlier. Manny cooperates with the police, as he has nothing to hide. Manny learns that he is a suspect in not only those hold-ups, but a series of other hold-ups in the same Jackson Heights neighborhood in New York City where they live. The more that Manny cooperates, the more guilty he appears to the police. With the help of Frank O'Connor, the attorney that they hire, they try to prove Manny's innocence. ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

25 steps down into a subway and for the first time he doesn't come home that night. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Film-Noir

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to the book "It's Only a Movie", Sir Alfred Hitchcock asked John Michael Hayes to work on the treatment and screenplay of this movie for no salary, but for a percentage of the profits. Hayes declined, and their four-picture relationship ended. See more »

Goofs

When Manny is put in the jail cell for the night, a man asks for and takes his tie. In the morning he is wearing the tie again. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Prologue narrator: This is Alfred Hitchcock speaking. In the past, I have given you many kinds of suspense pictures. But this time, I would like you to see a different one. The difference lies in the fact that this is a true story, every word of it. And yet it contains elements that are stranger than all the fiction that has gone into many of the thrillers that I've made before.
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Connections

Featured in Hitchcock/Truffaut (2015) See more »

User Reviews

 
Disquieting, a steely Fonda, and amazing Hitchcock. But it might make you edgy.
11 March 2010 | by secondtakeSee all my reviews

The Wrong Man (1956)

There's no question Alfred Hitchcock has pulled off something amazing here, a kind of experiment. Entirely based on true events, and without any sense of chase, romance, or high intrigue, and without special effects or even witty dialog, he makes you feel for the main character, Henry Fonda, a man accused of a crime he did not commit.

It's often pointed out that Hitchcock had an enormous fear of the police, and of being accused when innocent. This shows up in many of his films, but never more clearly or more painfully than here. To watch is an adventure in frustration, almost to the point you have to turn it off. But of course, you can't just get up and leave. You have to know what happens.

And the turns of events are so reasonable and yet so unbearable, you just want to get up there and say, do this, do that! It's weird to say, this is not an enjoyable movie. But it's a very good one, maybe flawless in its attempt to trap you as much as the main character was trapped. The surrounding cast is terribly believable, the cops, the wife, the kids. And it unfolds with such dramatic relentlessness. The camera angles (thanks to Robert Burks) are psychologically intense (and edited for discomfort). And the music (Bernard Herrmann, soon to score Psycho) only adds more tension.

Beautifully. As an exercise in precision, and in sticking to the facts, this is as good as a dramatic (non-documentary) film can get. Wikipedia has a small amount of helpful information, and tcm.com has a lot (click on articles or reviews on the left for a range of texts). But of course, watch it straight. See some period New York City scenes (from streets to jails to what looks like the amazing 57th St. bridge at dusk). A wonderful, if not uplifting, movie.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | Spanish

Release Date:

26 January 1957 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wrong Man See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,200,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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