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Harriet Craig (1950)

Approved | | Drama | 5 March 1951 (Sweden)
Trailer
2:16 | Trailer
Harriet Craig enjoys the married life but constantly tries to control those around her. She does not trust her husband, Walter, without checking up on him.

Director:

Vincent Sherman

Writers:

James Gunn (screenplay), Anne Froelich (screenplay) (as Anne Froelick) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
Joan Crawford ... Harriet Craig
Wendell Corey ... Walter Craig
Lucile Watson ... Celia Fenwick
Allyn Joslyn ... Billy Birkmire
William Bishop ... Wes Miller
K.T. Stevens ... Clare Raymond
Viola Roache ... Mrs. Harold
Raymond Greenleaf ... Henry Fenwick
Ellen Corby ... Lottie
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Storyline

Domineering Harriet Craig holds more regard for her home and its possessions than she does for any person in her life. Among those she treats like household objects are her kind husband Walter, whom she has lied to about her inability to have children; her cousin Claire, whom she treats like a secretary; and her servants whom she treats like slaves. Written by Daniel Bubbeo <dbubbeo@cmp.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

What Was Harriet Craig's Lie?

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is a remake of the 1930s film, Craig's Wife (1936), directed by Dorothy Arzner and starring Rosalind Russell, itself a remake of Craig's Wife (1928), directed by William C. de Mille and starring Irene Rich. See more »

Goofs

Throughout the movie, there are no locks on the door of the Craig house. During the final scene, when Harriet gives her final speech, a lock can be seen above the doorknob. See more »

Quotes

Walter Craig: I'm going next door. Where the scheming widow lives.
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Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Mouth (2008) See more »

User Reviews

Joan Crawford at her best!
9 April 2004 | by Starnostar80See all my reviews

Casting Joan Crawford as Harriet Craig was the perfect decision. She stars in this gloomy melodrama as a woman whose compulsion for cleanliness and complete control ultimately destroys her. I have heard before that this movie was written as a comedy (which is quite evident in the original version "Craig's Wife" starring Rosalind Russell) but due to Crawford's coldness in playing Harriet, the tone of the movie completely changed. Don't get me wrong, it does have its amusing moments, as unintentional as they might be. We see Crawford act completely condescending towards everyone she comes in contact with. It is made quite obvious that Harriet manipulates her husband, Walter, who believes Harriet is the perfect wife, by keeping him "happy" in the bedroom. Some rather suggestive dialogue even for 1950. The absolute best is when Harriet holds a dinner party for Walter's boss. She seems completely rude to her guests who all coincidentally happen to be over 50, making Harriet look like a glamour girl. Much of what makes this movie so amusing is the way in which the dialogue is presented, as well as Crawford's ridiculous gestures. "My that's a lovely vase.,' exclaims one of the guests, pointing towards Harriet's most prized possession. "It's Ming-Dynasty" replies Harriet proudly displaying her vase like some prize-girl on a gameshow. Harriet seems not to feel compassion for anyone and tolerates no mistakes. "I was wondering if you ever intended on serving the coffee, my guests have been waiting for quite some time!" Harriet shouts at her maids, causing one of them to drop a teacup. Harriet's looks as if she is about to explode as the cup shatters on the floor. "I'm so sorry Mrs. Craig!" "Yes, of course your sorry, but sorry won't mend my broken tea set!" sneers Harriet as she fires the maid. The movies seems to keep building just to show us how wicked Harriet is, including a visit to her husband's boss which is completely unforgettable. She interferes with her cousin's love life, almost causes her husband to lose his job, fires all of her staff, and to top it off is mean to the little boy next door. "What was Harriet Craig's Lie? proclaimed the posters and advertisements for this movie. The answer: Her entire existence. The lies just continue to pour out one after the other until everyone is so far driven by it, they leave. But does Harriet learn her lesson? Of course not, even the final line in the movie is a lie. So in the end all we see is Harriet with the only companion to whom she's stayed true...her house. This movie is by far one of my favorite Joan Crawford movies, and what's really coincidental about it, Harriet Craig, the character, almost foreshadows Joan's persona in Christina Crawford's trash novel "Mommie Dearest". Perhaps Christina saw this movie too many times, and confused the facts. :) ****If you liked this movie you'll LOVE Joan Crawford in "Queen Bee". It's like Harriet Craig, but set in the south! -Mark Thomas


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 March 1951 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

The Lady of the House See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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