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Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948)

Bud Abbott Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein (original title)
Not Rated | | Comedy, Fantasy, Horror | 15 June 1948 (USA)
The Wolf Man tries to warn a dimwitted porter that Dracula wants his brain for Frankenstein monster's body.

Directors:

Charles Barton (as Charles T. Barton), Walter Lantz (uncredited)

Writers:

Robert Lees (original screenplay), Frederic I. Rinaldo (original screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bud Abbott ... Chick
Lou Costello ... Wilbur
Lon Chaney Jr. ... Lawrence Talbot / The Wolfman (as Lon Chaney)
Bela Lugosi ... Dracula
Glenn Strange ... Monster
Lenore Aubert ... Sandra Mornay
Jane Randolph ... Joan Raymond
Frank Ferguson ... Mr. McDougal
Charles Bradstreet ... Dr. Stevens
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Storyline

The world of freight handlers Wilbur Grey and Chick Young is turned upside down when the remains of Frankenstein's monster and Dracula arrive from Europe to be used in a house of horrors. Dracula awakens and escapes with the weakened monster, who he plans to re-energize with a new brain. Larry Talbot (the Wolfman) arrives from London in an attempt to thwart Dracula. Dracula's reluctant aide is the beautiful Dr. Sandra Mornay. Her reluctance is dispatched by Dracula's bite. Dracula and Sandra abduct Wilbur for his brain and recharge the monster in preparation for the operation. Chick and Talbot attempt to find and free Wilbur, but when the full moon rises all hell breaks loose with the Wolfman, Dracula, and Frankenstein all running rampant. Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The LAUGHS are MONSTERous! Bud and Lou are in a stew when they tangle with the TITANS of TERROR! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the characters had previously appeared in House of Frankenstein (1944) and House of Dracula (1945), this is the only Universal film where Larry Talbot and Dracula share both a scene and dialogue. See more »

Goofs

Chick tells Wilbur to untie the boat that they're in at a dock, while the Monster throws barrels at them from a pier. However, Chick's lips don't move as he talks to Wilbur. See more »

Quotes

Wilbur Grey: Dracula is Dracula. And Sandra's gonna use my brain to make a bigger dummy out of the other dummy.
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Crazy Credits

Charles Bradstreet is credited as Dr. Stevens, but his character is never once called "Doctor." He is always referred to as Professor Stevens. See more »

Alternate Versions

For its original release, the Australian film board required that almost every scene involving a monster be removed before release. See more »

Connections

Featured in Universal Horror (1998) See more »

User Reviews

 
Still the finest scare comedy
18 February 2001 | by SlokeSee all my reviews

When Abbott and Costello were good, there was no one to touch them. Here they were at maybe their best, working with a great script and their best-by-a-mile concept. I prefer "Time Of Their Lives" as a film, but this is their finest hour or so as comedians.

As someone who grew up watching A&C Sundays at 11:30 AM in the NY area back when Cheech and Chong were the comedy team of the moment, it's great to revisit this one and see how well it all stands up. It's also nice to think, with all the personal sadness and cinematic dreck he was forced to go through, that Bela Lugosi managed to bat 1.000 in playing his greatest role, as he only played the Count in two film classics, this and "Dracula."

Playing the monsters straight probably was the best idea the filmmakers had, but there's other good stuff here. These guys were not resting on their laurels. The scenes with Chaney, the final chase, the dames (two for Lou, none for Bud), the music, all of it well-thought-out and very effective. Would the film have been better with Karloff than Strange as the Monster? Probably not, as the Monster is the least interesting character of the monster trio by necessity of plot (he's weak and needs to be continuously charged up by Drac, necessitating the immediate operation on Lou.) Karloff would have detracted from Lugosi's role more than adding anything of his own. Besides, Strange is very good.

Too bad Vincent Price couldn't make it when Bud and Lou went up against the Invisible Man for real two years later.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 June 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Brain of Frankenstein See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$800,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$4,796,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,812,444
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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