7.3/10
9,870
249 user 35 critic

Song of the South (1946)

Approved | | Animation, Comedy, Family | 20 November 1946 (USA)
The kindly story-teller Uncle Remus tells a young boy stories about trickster Br'er Rabbit, who outwits Br'er Fox and slow-witted Br'er Bear.

Writers:

Joel Chandler Harris (book), Dalton S. Reymond (story) (as Dalton Reymond) | 6 more credits »
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ruth Warrick ... Sally
Bobby Driscoll ... Johnny
James Baskett ... Uncle Remus / Br'er Fox (Voice)
Luana Patten ... Ginny
Lucile Watson ... Grandmother
Hattie McDaniel ... Aunt Tempy
Erik Rolf Erik Rolf ... John (as Eric Rolf)
Glenn Leedy Glenn Leedy ... Toby
Mary Field ... Mrs. Favers
Anita Brown Anita Brown ... Maid
Georgie Nokes Georgie Nokes ... Jake Favers (as George Nokes)
Gene Holland Gene Holland ... Joe Favers
Nick Stewart Nick Stewart ... Br'er Bear (voice) (as Nicodemus Stewart)
Johnny Lee Johnny Lee ... Br'er Rabbit (voice)
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Storyline

Uncle Remus draws upon his tales of Brer Rabbit to help little Johnny deal his confusion over his parents' separation as well as his new life on the plantation. The tales: The Briar Patch, The Tar Baby and Brer Rabbit's Laughing place. Written by Paul Penna <tterrace@wco.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Here Comes The Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah Show! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 November 1946 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Uncle Remus See more »

Filming Locations:

Phoenix, Arizona, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,203,111, 21 November 1986, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$63,717,040
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Walt Disney Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screenwriter Dalton S. Reymond wrote a story treatment for the film. Because Reymond was not a professional screenwriter, Maurice Rapf, who had been writing live-action features at the time, was asked by Walt Disney Productions to work with Reymond to turn the treatment into a shootable screenplay. According to Neal Gabler, one of the reasons Walt Disney had hired Rapf to work with Reymond was to temper what Disney feared would be Reymond's "white Southern slant". Rapf was a minority, a Jew, and an outspoken left-winger, and he himself feared that the film would inevitably be Uncle Tomish. "That's exactly why I want you to work on it," Walt told him, "because I know that you don't think I should make the movie. You're against Uncle Tomism, and you're a radical." Rapf initially hesitated, but when he found out that most of the film would be live-action and that he could make extensive changes, he accepted the offer. Rapf worked on "Uncle Remus" for about seven weeks. When he got into a personal dispute with Reymond, Rapf was taken off the project. According to Rapf, Walt Disney "ended every conference by saying 'Well, I think we've really licked it now.' Then he'd call you the next morning and say, 'I've got a new idea.' And he'd have one. Sometimes the ideas were good, sometimes they were terrible, but you could never really satisfy him." Morton Grant was assigned to the project. Disney sent out the script for comment both within the studio and outside the studio. See more »

Goofs

Shadows of the mike and boom are visible in the early scene in Johnny's room. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Uncle Remus: There's other ways of learning about the behind feet of a mule than getting kicked by them, sure as I'm named Remus. And just because these here tales is about critters like Br'er Rabbit an' Br'er Fox, that don't mean they ain't the same like can happen to folks! So them who can't learn from a tale about critters, just ain't got the ears tuned for listening.
See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Coonskin (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

Sooner Or Later (You're Gonna Be Comin' Around)
(uncredited)
Written by Charles Wolcott and Ray Gilbert
Performed by Hattie McDaniel
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Think it over before you react
3 May 2003 | by zetesSee all my reviews

This film will never receive a clean bill of political correctness, but neither will any film made before the 1960s. In fact, Song of the South presents some of the least offensive portraits of African Americans you can find from the time. If you really need to compare, go find any other film starring Hattie McDaniel – start with Gone With the Wind – and note how much more dignity she has in the Disney movie. Uncle Remus (James Baskett, who is utterly, utterly exceptional) is perhaps the most charming character you'll find. He's much more stereotypical of an elderly man than a black man. A smart man with strong morals and a clever way of delivering them, he seems to see things more clearly than anyone else in the film. No, Uncle Remus is a kind man who loves humanity, and this love is infectious. The movie made me very happy to be alive. A more politically correct version of the film would have him rebelling against white society with violence. It's kind of sad that we can't abide blacks and whites actually getting along, preaching brotherhood. The live action bits are very good (although I think Bobby Driscoll is a bit weak in the lead), but it is the animated pieces (and the live action/animation sequences) that make Song of the South great. Br'er Rabbit, Fox, and Bear are wonderful characters, and these three segments represent some of the best animation Disney ever did. The mixed scenes are amazing (was this the first time it was done?). I especially liked when Uncle Remus went fishing with Br'er Frog. Uncle Remus lights his pipe with an animated flame, and blows an animated smoke ring that turns into a square (which is, of course, also politically incorrect). I suspect that the biggest reason this film stirs so many negative emotions is the black dialect used in the film. I think that bugs people a lot. Really, though, blacks from the rural South have and have had their own accents and ways of speaking just as they have and have had in any other region. While the accents in this film are somewhat fabricated, I'm sure, I think that it would be a far cry to think of them as harmful to anybody. The hurt that people feel over this movie is the real fabrication, induced by PC thugs who seem to want to cause rifts between peoples. I think that a re-release of Song of the South could possibly have a beneficial effect on race relations in the United States, as it does depict dear friendships and respect between the races, something that I think we quite need at the moment.


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