5.7/10
229
15 user 5 critic

Where Do We Go from Here? (1945)

Approved | | Fantasy, Musical | 23 May 1945 (USA)
Bill wants to join the Army, but he's 4F so he asks a wizard to help him, but the wizard has slight problems with his history knowlege, so he sends Bill everywhere in history, but not to ... See full summary »

Directors:

Gregory Ratoff, George Seaton (uncredited)

Writers:

Morrie Ryskind (screenplay), Morrie Ryskind (story) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Fred MacMurray ... Bill Morgan
Joan Leslie ... Sally Smith / Prudence / Katrina
June Haver ... Lucilla Powell / Gretchen / Indian
Gene Sheldon ... Ali the Genie
Anthony Quinn ... Chief Badger
Carlos Ramírez ... Benito
Alan Mowbray ... General George Washington
Fortunio Bonanova ... Christopher Columbus (as Fortunio Bononova)
Herman Bing ... Hessian Col. / Von Heisel
Howard Freeman ... Kreiger
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mary Stewart
Edit

Storyline

Bill wants to join the Army, but he's 4F so he asks a wizard to help him, but the wizard has slight problems with his history knowlege, so he sends Bill everywhere in history, but not to WWII. Written by Stephan Eichenberg <eichenbe@fak-cbg.tu-muenchen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Lyrical Miracle of the Centuries! See more »

Genres:

Fantasy | Musical

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Only big screen pairing of Fred McMurray and wife June Haver. See more »

Goofs

Cast list misspells Fortunio Bonanova's surname as "Bononova." See more »

Connections

Featured in Fred MacMurray: The Guy Next Door (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

All at Once
(uncredited)
Music by Kurt Weill
Lyrics by Ira Gershwin
See more »

User Reviews

Two great talents miss
4 February 2019 | by ilprofessore-1See all my reviews

This heavy-handed big-budget 1945 Fox Technicolor comedy-romance musical features a great deal of rarely heard mediocre music, most of it by two of the greatest songwriters in the history of musical theater: the German composer Kurt Weill [ThreePenny Opera) and the American lyricist Ira Gershwin, George's brother, (Porgy and Bess). The only number among many that somehow rises above the ordinary is a well-staged ten-minute operetta parody, The Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, with clever W.S. Gilbert-type lyrics by Gershwin, well sung by Columbian tenor, Carlos Ramirez as the mutinous Benito, Fortunio Bonanova (the music teacher in Citizen Kane) as Columbus, and the ever reliable Fred MacMurray, as always doing his very best to bring some life to feeble songs, dialogue, and silly situations. Throughout the film, Fred sings, reasonably, and on one brief occasion even tries to dance, badly, as he pursues two beautiful young woman through time--the charming June Haver and the lovely Joan Leslie. Gregory Ratoff, who could do better and did sometimes, is credited as director, although George Seaton did a number of uncredited scenes. Otto Preminger, before he stopped acting to direct, can be seen briefly in one of his nasty German general roles, and Tony Quinn in one of his many Indian parts, this time played for comedy.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 15 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 May 1945 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Lâmpada Maravilhosa See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed