The Battle of Trafalgar (1911)

We show Lord Nelson leaving the admiralty room where he makes his famous speech and then introduce him with his captains giving the details of that wonderful plan of attack which was ... See full summary »

Director:

J. Searle Dawley
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Cast

Cast overview:
Sydney Booth ... Lord Nelson
Herbert Prior ... Lieutenant Prescott
James Gordon ... Captain Hardy
Charles Ogle ... The Ship's Surgeon
Laura Sawyer ... Lt. Prescott's Fiancée
Willis Secord Willis Secord ... Undetermined Role (unconfirmed)
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Storyline

We show Lord Nelson leaving the admiralty room where he makes his famous speech and then introduce him with his captains giving the details of that wonderful plan of attack which was carried out to the letter at Trafalgar, the inspirations of the captains and their enthusiastic toast. We are then carried along to the day before the battle when the men are writing their last letters home. Here a beautiful scenic and photographic effect is introduced as the vision of the sweetheart of one of the lieutenants fades into view. This gives an opportunity to introduce that famous episode of the letter in which Lord Nelson called back the mail ship for a single message and which is endeared to the hearts of all those who sail the sea. We are then carried along to the morning of October twenty-first, Eighteen Hundred and Five, when the fleet of the enemy is sighted. The decks are cleared for action and the hoisting of the colors is portrayed with all the solemnity of the occasion before ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

War

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 September 1911 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Slaget ved Trafalgar See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Edison Company See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The picture has bits of historic realism that are quite clever
5 April 2016 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

The Battle of Trafalgar, arresting as it did the power of Napoleon, just when that power seemed to develop into omnipotence, is justly counted among the fifteen decisive battles of history. A film maker, who undertakes to reproduce an event of such importance in moving pictures, deserves encouragement for the effort alone. It may be added at the outset that the effort of the Edison Company was altogether creditable. The picture has bits of historic realism that are quite clever. The "fighting top" of the enemy's ship "The Redoubtable" was an extremely well-conceived and well executed scene and has the merit of being in the story of it well sustained by historical tradition. The scene on board the "Victory" when, after so many hours of bloody fighting the fortunes of war went with the British, is stirring in the picture, as it must have been in reality. The death of Nelson was an affecting scene and to an Englishman must bring to mind one of the proudest moments in the history of his country. The appearance of Nelson before the Board of Admiralty is likewise worthy of special mention. The psychological moment has been seized by the director, and the spectator at the end of the scene feels that Nelson is going forth to conquer or to die. Special credit is due to the film maker for abstaining from the "love-fiction" too often interwoven with so- called historical pictures. The historical novel has been the pet aversion of literature and it would be too bad to have a revival of it on the screen. The educational value of the picture is great. - The Moving Picture World, September 9, 1911


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