Aaron Swartz (II) (1986–2013)


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Aaron Swartz was born on November 8, 1986 in Chicago, Illinois, USA. He is known for Aardvark'd: 12 Weeks with Geeks (2005), War for the Web (2015) and Steal This Film (2006). He died on January 11, 2013 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA. See full bio »

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Known For

Filmography

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 2015 War for the Web (Documentary)
Self
 2007 Steal This Film II (Documentary short)
Self
 2006 Steal This Film (Documentary short)
Self
 2005 Aardvark'd: 12 Weeks with Geeks (Documentary)
Self
Hide Hide Show Show Archive footage (4 credits)
  Steal This Sports Broadcast (TV Series documentary) (filming)
Self
 2019 DirtyBiology (TV Mini Series documentary)
Self

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Did You Know?

Personal Quote:

Be curious. Read widely. Try new things. I think a lot of what people call intelligence just boils down to curiosity.

Trivia:

In January 2011, he was arrested by MIT police on breaking-and-entering charges for downloading academic articles. Federal prosecutors then charged him with two counts of wire fraud and eleven violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The charges brought a total maximum penalty of $1 million in fines and thirty-five years in prison. See more »

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