Reviews written by registered user
osloj

Send an IMDb private message to this author or view their message board profile.

Page 1 of 27:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]
269 reviews in total 
Index | Alphabetical | Chronological | Useful

Lady Snow Bore 2, 21 July 2016
5/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers *** *Plot and ending analyzed* I guess if you have the brain of a gerbil and chew sugar candy all day, this film should fit your bill just fine. Others might want a little more in the way of a coherent story. There are parts of Lady Snowblood that are atmospheric and colorful, but the idea is not handled with enough competency, or even concern.

Lady Snowblood is some dull, waif of a woman, who has a feeble umbrella sword, whom she uses to chop in half corpulent bodies, hands, limbs and heads. Okay. The enemies are as imbecilic as the premise, even unable to fight such a woman. They just sit by and wait to be "chopped up". I must admit that the high reviews made me think these films would rate as high as Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman or Lone Wolf and Cub, but they are nowhere near as great.

Lady Snowblood - Love Song of Vengeance has her doing the same great sweeps of her little, feeble umbrella sword and they added some political rubbish to the play as well.

Still, they are worth a look for the time.

Lady Snow Bore, 20 July 2016
6/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers *** *Plot and ending analyzed* I guess if you have the brain of a gerbil and chew sugar candy all day, this film should fit your bill just fine. Others might want a little more in the way of a coherent story. There are parts of Lady Snowblood that are atmospheric and colorful, but the idea is not handled with enough competency, or even concern.

Lady Snowblood is some dull, waif of a woman, who has a feeble umbrella sword, whom she uses to chop in half corpulent bodies, hands, limbs and heads. Okay. The enemies are as imbecilic as the premise, even unable to fight such a woman. They just sit by and wait to be "chopped up". I must admit that the high reviews made me think these films would rate as high as Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman or Lone Wolf and Cub, but they are nowhere near as great.

Still, they are worth a look for the time.

Defence of the Realm, 19 July 2016
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Defense of the Realm isn't too bad, I think it is an interesting film with a premise that is very obscure. If you can understand some of the low-audible dialogue and the heavy-handed British lingo, then it's a worthwhile film.

Defense of the Realm has newspaper reporter Gabriel Byrne digging up muck in England, where a Member of Parliament gets thrashed and eventually dismissed for supposedly associating with a KGB agent.

It's hard to follow at times and the ending is a big let-down because during the entirety of the film there was an enigmatic suspense that was really showing itself. Still, it does manage to bring enough closure to allow for the full critique of the American nuclear program abroad, which is staffed by lunatics. As a political thriller is should satisfy the basic audience.

Also recommended: The Parallax View (1974) Three Days of the Condor (1975) The Conversation (1974) All the President's Men (1976) Telefon (1977)

The Unforgiven, 19 July 2016
6/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

When I first saw The Unforgiven in 1960 at the premiere film opening, with John Huston in attendance, I was wholly disgusted with the film. I could not believe the audience was applauding it. Somewhere inside, I was inherently sickened by the ending. The ending lacked any basis for humanity or compassion, or understanding. If you are not familiar with it, it seems totally uncharacteristic and vile. Audrey Hepburn, who we find out is actually an adopted Kiowa, shoots her own Kiowa brother, who wanted to find her. Then it ends on a peaceful note. I spoke to John Huston about it, but he was so busy with big-wigs to have a prolonged conversation.

Burt Lancaster also had a Kiowa who came on peace terms shot dead. Audie Murphy is his usual reprehensible anti-Indian self. I never liked him as an actor at all.

Kiowas would have had an easy time to get rid of the people in the homestead, they would have not killed off their warriors in such a ridiculous scene. It was bad enough that the Kiowa attack on the homestead was preposterous, piling up enough dead Kiowas in a long, haphazard scene, but the driving point is that Audrey Hepburn doesn't care about her past at all. She hates being an "indian". I suppose I side with Kiowas more since I lived with Kiowas, Comanches and Apaches. They have a vibrant history and a tradition of great culture. It seems like the whites don't think that way, thus they were demeaned as vile enemies in films and utter savages.

Even without the demeaning ending, the film is merely average.

Indio (1972)
Indio, 19 July 2016
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Indio is from 1972 and stars Jorge Rivero, which featured in some American films, to name a few, Soldier Blue (1970) (starring Candice Bergen, Peter Strauss and Donald Pleasence), Rio Lobo (1970) (starring John Wayne), The Last Hard Men (1976) (starring Charlton Heston and James Coburn). Here he's back home in a Mexican production. He's playing the role of an Indian for director Rodolfo de Anda (also a prolific Mexican actor), who also did another Mexican production of an "Indian film", called Cuchillo in 1978 and starring Andrés Garcia (another Mexican actor).

Indio, along with Cuchillo, both put the plight of the Indian on center stage and it seems like a very sympathetic view. Indio has some notable Mexican names like Emilio Fernandez (The Wild Bunch (1969), The War Wagon (1967), Guns for San Sebastian (1968)), Pedro Armendáriz Jr. (Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972), The Deadly Trackers (1973)) and Jorge Russek (Eagle's Wing (1979), The Return of a Man Called Horse (1976)) in it.

Indio is a decent film and will satisfy fans of the Western genre. I found it quite good.

Backflash (2002) (V)
Backtrash, 12 July 2016
4/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Backflash (2002) could have been a decent little movie, but it tries too hard to be unique and original. By the time the loop-sided ending comes around, it's such a mess that it isn't even clever or worthy. Jennifer Esposito is ridiculous as an ex-con "tough broad". She doesn't even look like she could harm a flea.

Robert Patrick is pretty much boring as a video store owner who gets stuck into trouble when picking up hitchhiker Jennifer Esposito. The film has a nice desert setting where it is desolate. The acting is made up of TV character actors who aren't that good or strong. Colm Meaney (Star Trek: The Next Generation) does his best to imitate a hard as nails gangster, with weak results.

Cohen & Tate, 11 July 2016
4/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

Cohen and Tate (1988) is about two totally inept hit men, but it's not a comedy, no, it's played with dark zeal, or at least, the actors attempt that. In fact, they aren't very good, even reliable Roy Scheider is overshadowed by the dismal overacting of Adam Baldwin. It all wears thin and the overabundance of driving will further put you in a claustrophobic mood. The driving scene has the same studio "lights" used repetitiously, also, look for the same car behind the hit men's car, with its lights on.

The ineptness of the hit men is so outstanding that I don't think anyone with a brain will believe the scenario. Some kid routinely badgers and harasses them until they all drive each other nuts, and then we get a ridiculous ending that made it all pointless.

End of the Party, 5 July 2016
6/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*Plot and ending analyzed*

End of the Party

Fin de fiesta (1972) is a bit of an odd duck, it hovers between being an art-house flick like Luis Buñuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (a group of Bourgeoisie attempt to eat together but are constantly interrupted) and something purely exploitative like a 1960's motorcycle film. It concerns a bunch of selfish snobs who are partying and destroying cars and drinking.

Later, they find a dead man at the bottom of the pool, with his head cracked open. They don't know him and want to get rid of his body because of a possible "scandal". They dump him at the roadside, but a motorcycle gang shows up at their gate and they start interrogating everyone. It's hard to tell if the film is being symbolic (the motorcycle gang is the disenfranchised conscience) or if it is just being enigmatic. That's what makes it work a bit. The motorcycle gang hovers between violence and kindness, most of the bourgeoisie women start sleeping with them, which is like Pier Paolo Pasolini's Teorema (1968). The ending reveals a mystery in who killed the dead man at the bottom of the pool. It isn't hard to figure out, but there's really no point to it all.

In all, it's not that good, and lags at times, but it has some interesting moments that some may enjoy or find bizarre.

In Spanish with no subtitles.

The Last of the Fast Guns, 5 July 2016
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The Last of the Fast Guns (1958) isn't a bad Western and the location is gorgeous, I think that's what pulls it through. At the start, two gunfighters shoot it out in town and the winner is invited to speak with an old man. He offers the winning gunfighter a job, to go look for his lost brother, who disappeared in Mexico. Jock Mahoney plays the gunfighter, he isn't very magnetic or interesting, but nonetheless he possesses the gunfighter creed.

Mexican actor Gilbert Roland is here as well, the same as usual, being suave and smoking a lot. He works for Lorne Greene, who is gone for most of the picture. the gunfighter looks for the supposed-dead brother and finds a bit of a mystery. The ending was rather contrived, but it isn't a horrible picture.

Bridge In The Jungle, 3 May 2016
5/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

A strange film, it has a weary crocodile hunter (a bland Charles Robinson) who goes to a mysterious village to hunt giant crocodiles, but only finds a few locals and a white man (John Huston) who saves his life after getting fever. He stays on and observes the life of the quaint village and inhabitants.

It is based on a story by B. Traven (which was the pseudonym of the enigmatic German novelist, whose identity was always hidden, some say he was a German anarchist or thief who left Germany to go to Mexico around 1920. He wrote The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1927), whom John Huston directed in 1948, and B. Traven was even on the set.)

The film itself remains curious, but quite basic and elemental, relying on the jungle to sustain its mood. The acting is natural, primitive and elementary. Katy Jurado (Mexican and American film actress) is in it, but not used much. John Huston as Sleigh serves more as an interpreter to the film audience than anything else. Chano Urueta (Mexican film director and actor, see Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch (1969) or Zapata (1970)). I even noticed one other familiar face, Jorge Martínez de Hoyos, the actor from The Magnificent Seven (1960).

The film delves primarily into the death of a village boy in the latter half for some reason. It ends on a odd note as well.


Page 1 of 27:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]