IMDb > Persepolis (2007)
Persepolis
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Persepolis (2007) More at IMDbPro »

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Persepolis -- This is the U.S. trailer for Persepolis, directed by Vincent Paronnaud and Marjane Satrapi.

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   60,162 votes »
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Writers:
Marjane Satrapi (comic)
Vincent Paronnaud (scenario)
Contact:
View company contact information for Persepolis on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 June 2007 (France) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Poignant coming-of-age story of a precocious and outspoken young Iranian girl that begins during the Islamic Revolution. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 28 wins & 42 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A whole new kind of animation See more (153 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Chiara Mastroianni ... Marjane (voice: French version) (voice: English version)

Danielle Darrieux ... Grandma (voice)

Catherine Deneuve ... Mom (voice: French version) (voice: English version)

Simon Abkarian ... Dad (voice)
Gabrielle Lopes Benites ... Marji (voice)
François Jerosme ... Anoush (voice)
Tilly Mandelbrot ... Lali (voice)
Sophie Arthuys ... Walla (voice)

Arié Elmaleh ... Walla (voice)
Mathias Mlekuz ... Walla (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Sean Penn ... Mr. Satrapi - Marjane's father (voice: English version)

Gena Rowlands ... Marjane's grandmother (voice: English version)
Adriana Anderson ... Enforcer / Nun / Teacher (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Paul Bandey ... Brit / Customs (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Robert Barr ... Anchor / God (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Robert William Bradford ... Guardian / Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Stephen Croce ... Cabbie / Director / Great Uncle / Marx / Motorist / PA / Taher / Vendor (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Bill Dunn ... Beans / Guardian / Speaker / Teacher / Welcome (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Christine Flowers ... Great Aunt / Shopper / Teacher (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
David Gasman ... Doctor / Guardian / Interrogator / Sentry / Siamak (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Matthew Géczy ... Markus / Momo / Sentry (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Lexie Kendrick ... Friend / Gossip / Teacher (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Mirabelle Kirkland ... Gossip / Welcome / Wife (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Chris Mack ... Revolutionary / Reza / Sentry (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Iggy Pop ... Anoush (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Nathan Rippy ... Flirt / Shopper / Thierry (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Marjane Satrapi ... Actress / Gossip / Schloss (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Barbara Scaff ... Enforcer / Laly / Megaphone / Nassrine / Welcome (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)
Allan Wenger ... Fereydoun / Fernando / Khosrow / Reza Shah / Shrink / Welcome (2008) (voice: English version) (uncredited)

Directed by
Vincent Paronnaud 
Marjane Satrapi 
 
Writing credits
Marjane Satrapi (comic)

Vincent Paronnaud (scenario)

Produced by
Rémi Burah .... consulting producer
Tara Grace .... co-producer (USA)
Kathleen Kennedy .... associate producer
Xavier Rigault .... producer
Marc-Antoine Robert .... producer
 
Original Music by
Olivier Bernet 
 
Film Editing by
Stéphane Roche 
 
Production Design by
Marisa Musy 
 
Art Direction by
Hicham Kadiri 
 
Production Management
Olivier Bizet .... production manager
Christina Crassaris .... post-production supervisor
Olivier Gravenhorst .... post-production supervisor
 
Art Department
Marc Jousset .... artistic director
Thierry Million .... lead background artist
 
Sound Department
Samy Bardet .... sound editor
Samy Bardet .... sound re-recording mixer
Samy Bardet .... supervising sound editor
Eric Chevallier .... dialogue editor
Jacques Defrance .... foley artist
Sylvie Gourgner .... sound
Thierry Lebon .... sound re-recording mixer
Michel Monier .... sound consultant: dolby
Johann Nallet .... sound recordist
Philippe Penot .... foley artist
Greg Steele .... adr mixer
Julie Tribout .... sound
Jean-Alexandre Villemer .... sound recordist
Greg Zimmerman .... adr recordist
 
Visual Effects by
Jimmy Capron .... scanning operator
Cyril Cosenza .... research & development supervisor
Frank Miyet .... supervision tracé
Stéphane Roche .... animatics
 
Animation Department
Damien Barrau .... animator: 2D
Pascal Chevet .... animator
Christian Desmares .... animation coordinator
Cecile Dubois-Herry .... assistant animator
Florian Fiebig .... key animator
Mael Gourmelen .... assistant animator
Virginie Hanrigou .... animator
Gregory Lecocq .... animator
Habib Louati .... animator
Ahmidou Lyazidi .... 3D supervisor
Nathalie Mathé .... CG animator
Benoit Meurzec .... animator
Thierry Peres .... assistant animator
Jung Wang .... layout supervisor
 
Casting Department
Sylvie Peyrucq .... voice casting
 
Editorial Department
Christian Dutac .... color timer
Le Guen Jean-Baptiste .... digital film supervisor
 
Music Department
Olivier Bernet .... music arranger
Olivier Bernet .... musical director
Olivier Bernet .... musician: synthesizer, bass, piano, ukulele, drums
Sophie Bousquet .... musician: flute
Stéphane Garin .... musician: percussion
Xavier Hayet .... musician: string bass
Marianne Eva Lecler .... musician: harp
Victor Marco .... musician: acoustic guitar
Vincent Paronnaud .... musician: bass, voice
Maitane Sebastian .... musician: cello, voice
 
Other crew
Sylvain Audi .... background voices
Sylvain Audi .... research and development
John Charles .... software manager: Sony DAC
Elyse Klaits .... associate: Ms. Kennedy
Hengameh Panahi .... world sales head: celluloid dreams
Charles-Edouard Renault .... legal counsel
Vincent Paronnaud .... dialogue director: english version (uncredited)
Marjane Satrapi .... dialogue director: english version (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material including violent images, sexual references, language and brief drug content
Runtime:
96 min | Turkey:89 min (TV version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Catherine Deneuve and Chiara Mastroianni lent their voices to the movie's English- and French-language versions, playing the same roles.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: The departures board at Paris Orly at the beginning has Cincinnati misspelled as "Cincinatti".See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Airport receptionist:Ticket and passport, please.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Eye of the TigerSee more »

FAQ

Is "Persepolis" based on a novel?
How closely does the movie follow the novels?
Why is the movie animated?
See more »
128 out of 162 people found the following review useful.
A whole new kind of animation, 31 December 2007
Author: Max_cinefilo89 from Italy

Persepolis is one of the most thoughtful, poignant and original films I have ever seen. Hang on, "poignant" and "thoughful", an animated movie (and based on a comic-book, on top of that)? Exactly, because coincidentally Persepolis also happens to be the first really adult "cartoon" I've had the pleasure to watch (Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly don't count, as they were filmed with real actors first, and subsequently modified in post-production). For all their good intentions, the likes of Dreamworks and Pixar always have an eye for what the little ones want to see, while The Simpsons, despite the occasional "mature" storyline (basically Homer and Marge's sex life), contains nothing a 12-year old isn't supposed to see. As for Family Guy and South Park, they might be aimed at grown-ups with their merciless satire and, in the case of the latter series, explicit language, but are made with an almost puerile sense of joy which prompts younger kids to watch them in secret. Persepolis, on the other hand, deals with adult themes in a serious, unpretentious way. So yes, it is an animated film. Yes, it is based on a comic-book. And yes, there is the occasional neat movie reference (Rocky III being the most memorable one). That doesn't mean it's a kids' movie, though; it just means the picture was made with a particular style because it was the most effective way to tell this specific story.

And what is so special about the story? Well, it is an account of what is going on in contemporary Iran, a topic that is more relevant today than it's ever been before. And the extra layer of poignancy derives from the fact that co-director Marjane Satrapi experienced every single event in the film. After moving to France to avoid the increasingly oppressive political situation that had developed in Teheran (which the ancient Greeks called Persepolis, hence the movie's title), she published her autobiography in the form of a graphic novel, which immediately became a cult phenomenon. With the help of artist Vincent Paronnaud, the stylized drawings have become a motion picture which has already conquered critics and won several awards (the Jury Prize in Cannes being one of them).

The film's strict adherence to the book's style makes for simple but powerful viewing: the simple pictures ensure the story doesn't need to be filtered, but can be understood right away, while the use of black and white provide the images with a strength that would otherwise be missing. A good example is a scene depicting a demonstration against the despotic regime in Iran and the subsequent shooting of one of the protesters, whose body is left lying on the ground: as his blood starts to flow, the corpse almost merges with the environment, giving the shot (pun not intended) an emotional relevance it wouldn't have, had the whole thing been in color. The choice of animation proves to be particularly effective in a most unusual choice for this kind of film, namely fantasy sequences: there is a hilarious moment, for instance, when Marjane, during a stay in Vienna, looks back on her disappointment in love and sees her ex-boyfriend as a depraved freak; live-action would have ruined that scene, undoubtedly. As it is, however, it comes off not as a bizarre formal experiment, but a fundamental tool for understanding the heroine's psychology.

That said, it should also be noted that Persepolis isn't just a bold take on the difficulties in the Middle East. As seen in Clint Eastwoood's Iwo Jima double bill, the line between "heroes" and "villains" is very thin, and the film never misses the opportunity to show how bad our own society can be: Marjane ends up hating Europe more than her home-country, and at the beginning a flashback shows the British government's role in manipulating Iranian politics for money's sake. Incidentally, the latter scene is depicted as a puppet show, providing a new, fresh angle: what sets truth apart from fiction?

Persepolis works because it handles an uncomfortable subject with grace, using a simple but constantly effective storytelling technique and never once pandering to audience expectations with the usual 'toon gimmicks (even the casting proves that: except for Catherine Deneuve, who plays the low-key role of Marjane's mother, there are no famous voices in the feature). It sticks to traditions and stretches the medium at the same time, showing that animation is no longer a "children's genre" and therefore delivering a new way to look at film-making and its possibilities. For this reason, and several more, it is one of the best pictures of 2007.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (153 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Persepolis (2007)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
is there really so much hostilty towards foreigners in Europe? thoughtlessthinker
I'm VERY fearful of the future of my country (Turkey) aykutsgn
Pawn of the N.W.O. juan6966
Isn't Marjane Satrapi afraid that they will harass her family? rumpelteazer666
Autobiographic? hgmichna
No Khomeini jeroenvanmarle
See more »

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