IMDb > New Year's Day (1989)
New Year's Day
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New Year's Day (1989) More at IMDbPro »

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New Year's Day -- A man returns to his sublet apartment to find the previous tenants, three offbeat young women, still in residence, under the mistaken belief that they have the apartment until the end of New Year's Day.

Overview

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5.5/10   185 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Henry Jaglom (writer)
Contact:
View company contact information for New Year's Day on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 December 1990 (Netherlands) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Time to move on...
Plot:
A man returns to his sublet apartment to find the previous tenants, three offbeat young women, still in residence... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Jaglom's inner-Woody Allen, as stated, is channeled but not fully realized See more (6 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Maggie Wheeler ... Lucy (as Maggie Jakobson)
Gwen Welles ... Annie
Melanie Winter ... Winona

Henry Jaglom ... Drew

David Duchovny ... Billy

Milos Forman ... Lazlo
Michael Emil ... Dr. Stadthagen
Donna Germain ... Dr. Stadthagen's Friend
Harvey Miller ... Lucy's Father
Irene Moore ... Lucy's Mother
James E. dePriest ... Lucy's Shrink

Tracy Reiner ... Marjorie

Robert Hallak ... Delivery Man
Katherine Wallach ... Delivery Man's Friend
Paul Dark ... Redheaded Man

Adam Guettel ... Young Man
James Hurt ... Winona's Brother
Kristina Loggia ... Stella
Robert Morton ... Stella's Friend
Rodger Parsons ... Annie's Boss

Directed by
Henry Jaglom 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Henry Jaglom  writer

Produced by
Phyllis Curott .... associate producer
Judith Wolinsky .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Joey Forsyte 
 
Makeup Department
Angela Nogaro .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Helen Kantor .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Barbara Flood .... set dresser
 
Sound Department
John Boyd .... sound re-recording mixer
Patricia Brolsma .... boom operator
Catherine Calderon .... additional sound
Judy Karp .... sound
Sunny Meyer .... additional sound
Laurie Seligman .... boom operator
Paul A. Sharpe .... sound re-recording mixer
Edward F. Suski .... sound re-recording mixer
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Hanania Baer .... additional photographer
Bonnie Blake .... second assistant camera
Nesya Blue .... additional cinematographer
Richard Boyle .... gaffer
Dan Elsasser .... assistant camera
Chris Fenney .... key grip
Jeff Levy .... gaffer
Charlie Marroquin .... grip
Glenn R. Miller .... electrician
James Rosenthal .... gaffer
Randy Shanofsky .... camera operator
Jim Sofranko .... gaffer
Susan Starr .... first assistant camera
 
Editorial Department
Michelle Hart .... assistant editor
Ruth Zucker Wald .... associate editor
 
Other crew
Helen Kantor .... assistant to director
Elicia Laport .... production assistant
Tommy Winston .... production assistant
Patrick Woods .... production assistant
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
88 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
To Jaglom's surprise, this film was the official American selection at the Venice Film Festival in 1990, and this was the basis of Jaglom's film Venice/Venice. Jaglom went to film that movie in Venice while there to promote this film.See more »
Quotes:
Lazlo:What does a man usually say when he can't perform?See more »
Soundtrack:
It's a Most Unusual DaySee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Jaglom's inner-Woody Allen, as stated, is channeled but not fully realized, 1 January 2014
Author: Steve Pulaski from United States

New Year's Day is what happens when a filmmaker channels their inner-Woody Allen. What you get, as a result, is sort of a mish-mash of visions and a predictably talky affair about a man moving into an apartment in New York after leaving the hustle of Los Angeles in order to continue his life as a writer. Upon arriving at his apartment, he discovers the former tenants - three young, yuppie girls - have yet to move out, misinterpreting the lease that says they must move out by January 1st, not stay in the apartment on January 1st.

In the normal world, the tenants would likely pack up and leave. But since they exist in a drama, they must stay and strike up a conversation with the frazzled, neurotic (!) writer that has graced their presence. The girls get a look at a different side of a male - the less confident, quirky side, while the man gets a look at life and young, impulsive love in the Big Apple. The man is Drew (Henry Jaglom, who serves as the writer and the director as well) and the girls are oddball Annie (Gwen Welles), simplistic Winona (Melanie Winter) and love-struck Lucy (Maggie Wheeler), who is crying to be independent and released from the shackles of her overprotective parents.

Drew connects with Lucy the most, admiring her young impulsiveness, as well as her braveness in terms of facing the world head-on. Her father warns her that packing up and moving away from her girlfriends and looking for a job as a model may result in her being hurt or manipulated, however, it doesn't bother her and believes she can handle being hurt. Meanwhile, Annie deals with the idea of leaving her girlfriends, when there may be something more to that. The last act of the film consists of a party at the apartment, thrown by the girls as a combination between a going-away party and a party welcoming the new year.

The first forty-five minutes of New Year's Day have a kind of fly-on-the-wall perspective I rarely tire of. The film makes us the invisible character at this gathering, at four different characters at a variety of stages in their life and tries to force us to make a connection in some way, shape, or form. Jaglom does this by dialog and a lot of it. The conversational beauty of New Year's Day stems from its improvisation, probably the only way this film could've been successfully done. The film has the natural fluidity of day-to-day conversations, while not forgoing the film's plan, which is showing Drew at his most cynical and neurotic point in life while showing the three girls at their most vulnerable and indecisive.

Furthermore, the film vaguely illustrates the concept of a generation gap I would've liked to see more of. The film sets itself up to play like a picture that showcases character debates based on different stages in their lives and the age difference of the characters (the man is in his late forties, while the girls are in their mid-twenties). However, despite a lot of talking, rarely does it boil down to that. Drew doesn't offer his own moral take on what the girls are doing. For a film with a lot to say, it unfortunately neglects a key-element of the storytelling.

The film's dialog is often potent, in terms of realism and fluidity, however, occasionally uninspired and clearly trying to convey some form of directorial/screenwriter artistry. Consider the scene when Drew talks with Billy (David Duchovny in a very young role), Lucy's boyfriend. The scene should address the generational differences between the two characters but instead focuses on self-absorbed conversation that tries too hard to be artful and more than it is. This is when Jalom's channeling of Woody Allen becomes more evident than ever. Unlike Allen, who can take any character and throw them in any setting with practically anything interesting to say that will always come to a certain point, Jaglom circles around his characters, almost never coming to a distinct point other than to showcase lengthy bouts of dialog.

New Year's Day is an enjoyable indie session, but after fifty-five minutes, it begins to become exhausting, all the more when we're introduced to numerous characters at a party that seem to be nothing more than empty vessels that want to start drama despite all the dialog they spew like sewers. Jaglom illustrates an interesting setup - resolutions, life-altering decisions, and personal struggles on one of the year's most loved days. His inner-Woody Allen, as stated, is channeled but not fully realized.

Starring: Henry Jagolm, Gwen Welles, Melanie Winter, Maggie Wheeler, and David Duchovny. Directed by: Henry Jaglom.

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