IMDb > Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975)
Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma
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Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975) More at IMDbPro »Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
6.0/10   33,913 votes »
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Up 12% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Pier Paolo Pasolini (written by) and
Sergio Citti (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 January 1976 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Banned in Australia for 17 years - Now for the first time Australian audiences have the opportunity to judge one of the most controversial films in the history of cinema. A work of rigorous moral intelligence or a descent into a nightmare of cruelty and lust? (1993) See more »
Plot:
Four fascist libertines round up nine adolescent boys and girls and subject them to a hundred and twenty days of physical, mental and sexual torture. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(34 articles)
User Reviews:
Salo is now, Gladio is real See more (360 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Paolo Bonacelli ... The Duke
Giorgio Cataldi ... The Bishop
Umberto Paolo Quintavalle ... The Magistrate (as Umberto P. Quintavalle)
Aldo Valletti ... The President
Caterina Boratto ... Signora Castelli
Elsa De Giorgi ... Signora Maggi
Hélène Surgère ... Signora Vaccari (as Helene Surgere)
Sonia Saviange ... The Pianist
Sergio Fascetti ... Male Victim
Bruno Musso ... Male Victim
Antonio Orlando ... Male Victim
Claudio Cicchetti ... Male Victim
Franco Merli ... Male Victim
Umberto Chessari ... Male Victim
Lamberto Book ... Male Victim
Gaspare Di Jenno ... Male Victim
Giuliana Melis ... Female Victim
Faridah Malik ... Female Victim
Graziella Aniceto ... Female Victim
Renata Moar ... Female Victim
Dorit Henke ... Female Victim
Antiniska Nemour ... Female Victim (as Antinisca Nemour)
Benedetta Gaetani ... Female Victim
Olga Andreis ... Female Victim
Tatiana Mogilansky ... Daughter
Susanna Radaelli ... Daughter
Giuliana Orlandi ... Daughter
Liana Acquaviva ... Daughter
Rinaldo Missaglia ... Guard
Giuseppe Patruno ... Guard
Guido Galletti ... Guard
Efisio Etzi ... Guard
Claudio Troccoli ... Collaborator
Fabrizio Menichini ... Collaborator
Maurizio Valaguzza ... Collaborator
Ezio Manni ... Collaborator
Paola Pieracci ... Wife
Carla Terlizzi ... Wife
Anna Maria Dossena ... Wife
Anna Recchimuzzi ... Wife
Ines Pellegrini ... The Slave Girl
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Marco Lucantoni ... First Male Victim (uncredited)

Directed by
Pier Paolo Pasolini 
 
Writing credits
Pier Paolo Pasolini  written by and
Sergio Citti  screenplay collaborator

Pupi Avati  uncredited
Marquis de Sade  novel "Les 120 Journées de Sodome" (uncredited)

Produced by
Alberto Grimaldi .... producer
Alberto De Stefanis .... producer (uncredited)
Antonio Girasante .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Ennio Morricone 
 
Cinematography by
Tonino Delli Colli 
 
Film Editing by
Nino Baragli 
Tatiana Casini Morigi 
Enzo Ocone 
 
Production Design by
Dante Ferretti 
 
Set Decoration by
Osvaldo Desideri 
 
Costume Design by
Danilo Donati 
 
Makeup Department
Giusy Bovino .... hair stylist (as Giusi Bovino)
Osvaldo Desideri .... makeup artist
Alfredo Tiberi .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Renzo David .... production supervisor
Alberto De Stefanis .... unit manager
Antonio Girasante .... production manager
Alessandro Mattei .... production supervisor
Angelo Zemella .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Umberto Angelucci .... first assistant director
Fiorella Infascelli .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Maria-Teresa Barbasso .... draughtswoman
Italo Tomassi .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Fausto Ancillai .... sound mixer
Massimo Anzellotti .... sound effects editor
Giorgio Loviscek .... sound
Domenico Pasquadibisceglie .... sound
Giuseppina Sagliano .... boom operator
 
Special Effects by
Alfredo Tiberi .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Sandro Battaglia .... first assistant camera
Deborah Imogen Beer .... still photographer (as Deborah Beer)
Emilio Bestetti .... camera operator
Giancarlo Granatelli .... second assistant camera
Carlo Tafani .... camera operator
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Vanni Castellani .... costume assistant
 
Editorial Department
Stephen Bearman .... colorist (digitally restored version)
Ugo De Rossi .... assistant editor
Alfredo Menchini .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Arnaldo Graziosi .... musician: piano
 
Other crew
Beatrice Banfi .... script supervisor
Vittorio Cudia .... assistant secretary
Maurizio Forti .... administrator
Alberto Grimaldi .... presenter
Pietro Innocenti .... administrator
Nico Naldini .... publicist
Marco Bellocchio .... voice dubbing: Aldo Valletti (uncredited)
Laura Betti .... voice dubbing: Hélène Surgère (uncredited)
Giorgio Caproni .... voice dubbing: Giorgio Cataldi (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
116 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:R (2010) | Australia:(Banned) (1976-1993) (1998-2010) | Brazil:18 | Canada:R (Ontario) | Canada:18+ (Quebec) | Chile:18 | Finland:K-18 (2001) | Finland:(Banned) (1976) | France:16 | France:X (original rating) | Germany:BPjM Restricted | Germany:Not Rated (SPIO/JK) (uncut) (2005) | Hungary:18 | Italy:(Banned) (original rating) | Italy:VM18 (re-rating after appeal) | Japan:R-18 | Malaysia:(Banned) | Mexico:D (cut) | Netherlands:16 | New Zealand:(Banned) (original rating) | New Zealand:R18 (re-rating) (2001) (uncut) | Norway:18 (re-rating) (2005) (video premiere) | Norway:(Banned) (1976-2003) (cinema release) | Portugal:M/18 | Singapore:Unrated | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | Sweden:15 (uncut) | UK:X (original rating) (cut) (alternate footage) | UK:18 (re-rating) (2000) (uncut) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:(Banned) (cinema release) | West Germany:18 (nf) (cut) (original rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In at least three scenes, when the four "villains" enter a room, they walk over a beam of light that's coming from outside.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: In the beginning of the film a 1948 Fiat 500 B can be seen.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
[four men, sitting at a table, each sign a booklet]
The Duke:Your Excellency.
The Magistrate:Mr. President.
The President:My lord.
The Bishop:All's good if it's excessive.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Due Bounty Killer Per Un Massacro (2007) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Carmina Burana - III. Veris Laeta FaciesSee more »

FAQ

Did anything in this movie happen in real life?
See more »
143 out of 217 people found the following review useful.
Salo is now, Gladio is real, 25 December 2005
Author: Matthew Janovic (myboigie@earthlink.net) from United States

So you say you've seen nearly-every major Italian-giallo? You've seen Argento, Mario Bava, Lucio Fulci, Michele Soavi, and even all the "classics" of Italian-film? Leone, Fellini, DeSicca, Bertolucci, Martino, and even most of the "world-classics"? By this point, you've probably seen-it-all, and you think there is no film that will shock you? If you haven't seen Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Salo", you are wrong. Pasolini didn't even live to see the film widely-released--he was murdered by a male-hustler (or so the official-story plays). Pier Pasolini was the most-important post-war intellectual in Italy, period. Like a Renaissance polymath, he was adept at journalism, the novel, poetry, screen writing, directing motion-pictures, and more. His revolutionary-philosophy was against fascism and communism, and he had many enemies in the political-arena, as well as the religious. All-said, however, it's likely that Pier Pasolini was murdered by a right-wing assassination-team under the aegis of "gladio", a NATO program of secret-armies through Western Europe. Gladio began, ostensibly, as a defense-against a hypothetical Soviet-invasion of Europe, but was used to attack legitimate Leftist political-parties and groups. The Red Brigade bombings in the 1970s were even instigated-by gladio-operatives to justify a law-and-order crackdown of the Italian Communist Party--it is a mystery as to how-much CIA-influence this all had. The P-2 conspiracy (oddly, involving the Vatican, the CIA, KGB, and renegade Freemasons!) had yet-to-break. There were dozens of politically-motivated killings in 1970s-Italy, and Pasolini's was one-of-many. One has to wonder how-much involvement the Vatican had in his murder, as well.

And so, "Salo" enters this bloody-fray. It could not be any more controversial on all-fronts, and is a shout-of-rage against how little we all care about human-life itself. Pasolini was outraged and disappointed with the human-condition, and Italian politics had become chaos--leading Sergio Leone to remark at the time that, "Italian politics have become ridiculous." The scenario of Salo is fairly-simple: a group of Italian-fascists retreat to a palace in Northern Italy (where there was a great-deal of support for Italian fascism and the Monarch) with a group of sixteen boys and girls. It is the short-lived Republic of Salo, hence the title that any Italian of the 1970s would recognize. For 120-days, they degrade them in almost every-imaginable-way. Gay-rape, buggery, forcing people to eat-excrement, and finally, death. Of course, it's all based-loosely on DeSade's tale and stays pretty-closely to the text's themes and scenarios. He "chapters" each section with some of the structure of Dante's "Inferno", which is genius. To say this film is merely a statement on fascism would be wrong, it is a manifesto on what cruelty rests within all human-hearts. Pasolini understood that, under the right-circumstances, we are all capable of these depredations. Some reviewers have stated they didn't find the film shocking--they should check-themselves into a clinic somewhere. I've noticed that even friends who are into such directors as Takashi Miike, respect the power of this film. Miike has some similarities-in-style with Pasolini, but goes for a more genre, stylized-look. Even John Waters lists this film as sicker than his worst-offenders! To say I was shocked would be an understatement.

Besides being pretty sick, this film looks pretty-good. The late Tonnino Colli's (who also worked-for Fellini and Leone) photography lends the film a look that could be hung in the Louvre, and it gives the film a greater subversive-edge. It should be noted that the film is not "legitimately-available" in the United State for copyright reasons. However, there are very-good copies out-there since it is not in-print. I found one that is an exact-duplicate of the original US-edition for a decent-price, so it is out there, with some searching. The Criterion edition is reportedly the most-expensive DVD in the world, going for as-much as $600.00 USD. Criterion's is the best-transfer we have to-date. I've got a few Ken Russell DVDs ("Salome's Last Dance")that are worth as-much as $300.00 USD, so this is a shocker! It's funny to see used DVDs of the big Hollywood-fare at $3.99 USD, while these are in-the-hundreds! It says-a-lot about what is lasting and meaningful to people, and it ain't blockbuster movies. A company called "Water Bearer" has sets of Pasolini's other works, but I have it on good-word that they are inferior-quality. It would be nice if Criterion did a Pasolini Box that included a newer-transfer of "Salo" with restoration. It is one of the most-important films ever made. We all stand-accused, even the filmmaker, and that's the point. Be warned: not for children or adults who fear soul-searing, raw-existentialism.

NOTE: The "ass-judging-scene" is similar to photos of the "flesh-pyramid" at Abu-Ghraib. http://chickasawpicklesmell.blogspot.com/

Was the above review useful to you?
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Where can I legally watch this? Ser_Pounce_Is_My_Homeboy
Has anyone read De Sade's 120 Days of Sodom? Ser_Pounce_Is_My_Homeboy
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What would you do if you were taken? HorrorFanatic24
Did I watch a censored version? isaacmata14
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