IMDb > The Trouble with Girls (1969)
The Trouble with Girls
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The Trouble with Girls (1969) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
5.3/10   806 votes »
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Down 10% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Arnold Peyser (screenplay) &
Lois Peyser (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Trouble with Girls on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 September 1969 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Elvis crosses the country...into trouble! trouble! trouble! See more »
Plot:
Chautauqua manager Walter Hale and his loyal business manager struggle to keep their traveling troupe together in small town America. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
The Trouble with Movie Contracts... See more (15 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Elvis Presley ... Walter Hale

Marlyn Mason ... Charlene
Nicole Jaffe ... Betty

Sheree North ... Nita Bix

Edward Andrews ... Johnny

John Carradine ... Mr. Drewcolt

Anissa Jones ... Carol

Vincent Price ... Mr. Morality

Joyce Van Patten ... Maude
Pepe Brown ... Willy

Dabney Coleman ... Harrison Wilby
Bill Zuckert ... Mayor Gilchrist
Pitt Herbert ... Mr. Perper
Anthony 'Scooter' Teague ... Clarence (as Anthony Teague)
Med Flory ... Constable
Robert Nichols ... Smith
Helene Winston ... Olga Prchlik
Kevin O'Neal ... Yale
Frank Welker ... Rutgers

John Rubinstein ... Princeton
Charles Briles ... Amherst (as Chuck Briles)
Patsy Garrett ... Mrs. Gilchrist
Linda Sue Risk ... Lily-Jeanne
Charles P. Thompson ... Cabbie
Leonard Rumery ... First Farmhand
William M. Paris ... Second Farmhand
Kathleen Rainey ... Third Farmhand
Hal Pederson ... Soda Jerk (as Hal James Pederson)
Mike Wagner ... Chowderhead
Brett Parker ... Iceman
Duke Snider ... The Cranker
Pacific Palisades High School Madrigals ... Choral Group
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Joe Esposito ... Gambler (uncredited)
William H. O'Brien ... Hotel Lobby Extra (uncredited)

Susan Olsen ... Auditioning Singer (uncredited)
Jerry Schilling ... Deputy Sheriff (uncredited)
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Directed by
Peter Tewksbury 
 
Writing credits
Arnold Peyser (screenplay) &
Lois Peyser (screenplay)

Day Keene (novel "Chautauqua") and
Dwight V. Babcock (novel "Chautauqua") (as Dwight Babcock)

Mauri Grashin (story)

Produced by
Wilson McCarthy .... associate producer
Lester Welch .... producer
 
Original Music by
Billy Strange 
 
Cinematography by
Jacques R. Marquette (director of photography) (as Jacques Marquette)
 
Film Editing by
George W. Brooks 
 
Art Direction by
Edward C. Carfagno  (as Edward Carfagno)
George W. Davis 
 
Set Decoration by
Henry Grace 
Jack Mills 
Robert R. Benton (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Bill Thomas 
 
Makeup Department
Mary Keats .... hair stylist
William Tuttle .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Robert Vreeland .... unit production manager
Lindsley Parsons Jr. .... assistant production manager: MGM (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
John Clarke Bowman .... assistant director (as John Clark Bowman)
 
Sound Department
Franklin Milton .... recording supervisor
 
Other crew
Jonathan Lucas .... choreographer
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
97 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White | Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Elvis used to sing some of his hit songs on the set, and would often suck helium from balloons to make his voice sound high and strange.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the musical number, "Look In Your Own Back Yard", the girl appears to change sides behind Elvis. Although there is a slight change of camera angle when far away from Elvis then close up, her move from behind Elvis's left shoulder to behind his right shoulder looks wrong.See more »
Quotes:
Walter Hale:Sit down!
Charlene:Why?
Walter Hale:'Y' is a crooked letter.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Brady Bunch Home Movies (1995) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
Doodle Doo DooSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
15 out of 17 people found the following review useful.
The Trouble with Movie Contracts..., 1 September 2002
Author: Shane Paterson from Las Vegas, NV

I'd never really particularly liked this film mainly because it was nominally an Elvis movie but had Elvis pretty much co-starring in his own film. It's true that he doesn't get much screen time in this, his second-to-last scripted screen performance, but upon this screening I found that I enjoyed it more just as a film. The story is a little draggy, and fairly quirky, and this is a property that'd been shopped around for years before ending up as an Elvis Presley project.

Chautauquas were popular traveling shows that, peaking around the turn of the century, brought to small towns lecturers and performers of all kinds. In "The Trouble With Girls" (weird title, more descriptive of some of his earlier '60s movies than this piece), Elvis plays the manager of a traveling Chautauqua troupe. They arrive by train in a small Iowa town and -- well -- trouble ensues. In reality, though, the trouble's mainly with the men. The film was originally titled "Chautauqua" but its name was changed because studio executives felt that nobody'd know what the heck a Chautauqua was. Didn't really matter much, anyway, because by 1969 Elvis' movies were finally not exactly packing them in and the unwieldy title "The Trouble With Girls (And How To Get Into It)" is hardly descriptive or indicative of the film's contents. Those who were still going to see Elvis' movies at the theater probably would've gone to see it if they'd titled it "Elvis Presley Movie #29," anyway.

Elvis looks great in this film, with sideburns not only restored to full pre-Army glory (as they had been since late '67) but bigger and fuller than ever before. He does a fine job acting, even though his role is not as demanding as some he'd taken on if only because he was just one of an ensemble cast. It was quite a cast, too, including the likes of Vincent Price (great in a brief couple of bits as "Mister Morality") and John Carradine (only briefly seen, unfortunately -- conventional wisdom has it that this is the last film in which he and Vincent Price appeared together, though IMDB tells me that they co-starred in two more in the '80s). Dabney Coleman, ever-smarmy as a cheating druggist, is excellent as always and it's his character who ends up polarizing and driving the action forward on this rather lethargic property.

But it's an Elvis movie, right? (well, sort of) So what about the songs? Well, because of the setting, all of the songs are realistic in presentation -- none of the typical musical's invisible orchestra -- and most of the Elvis tunes are further realistic in terms of their instrumentation. Elvis doesn't sing much in this film (1968's "Speedway," shot in the summer of 1967, was the last song-heavy Elvis film) but most of what he does is excellent stuff. The rousing traditional black gospel song, "Swing Down, Sweet Chariot" (a totally different song to the "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" that most are familiar with) is done to perfection under the Chautauqua's big tent. Elvis had recorded this song back in 1960 and remade it for this film -- it was only the second of three 'religious' songs that Elvis did for the movies (the first was 1967's "Sing, You Children" from "Easy Come, Easy Go," and the third was "Let Us Pray" from 1969's "Change Of Habit"). Elvis also does a few lines of "Violet" during a medley of college fight songs (he also recorded "The Whiffenpoof Song" but, if it was included in the movie, it's missing from my copy) and he unveils a pretty and simple ballad, "Almost" near the movie's end. Along the way he and Marlyn Mason (no, not Marilyn Manson) duet on the Dixielandish "Signs Of The Zodiac," basically a novelty song. Elvis also does a song called "Clean Up Your Own Backyard," a song that pithily targets hypocrisy (small-town or big-city varieties) and that was as relevant to the situation in 1969, or today, as it was to the movie's central plot. The song is excellent and is heard here without the overdubbing that accompanied the single release. "Clean Up Your Own Back Yard" is easily among the very best of Elvis' movie songs and would have fit seamlessly within the body of work that he was laying down in the studio around this time, all of it of excellent quality (his legendary Memphis sessions of 1969 were just three or so months in the future when he made this film).

This is not one of the classic Elvis films, even within the subgenre of Elvis' classic ‘60s musical films -- it's a drama-focused period piece in which Elvis is an underutilized part of an ensemble cast. It does, however, have some good scenes and some solid acting, though it wasn't about to give Butch and Sundance a run for their money at the box office. Elvis began production of this film a couple of months after taping the legendary 1968 TV Special and within a year would make headlines around the world as a result of his triumphant return to the concert stage. "The Trouble With Girls" was symptomatic of a Hollywood world that had palled in Elvis' mind and that would soon be totally irrelevant to who he was and who he was perceived to be. It's interesting, and has its moments, but it pales beside the real-life drama of Elvis in his element...performing live on stage. Still, for me, seeing Elvis do "Clean Up Your Own Back Yard" is, alone, reason enough to catch this rather odd film. And if you want to see Elvis in anything but ‘a typical Elvis Presley film,' this might be the movie for you. That is, if you can't find a copy or broadcast of "Flaming Star" or "Follow That Dream."

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