7.0/10
7,184
90 user 23 critic

Bedazzled (1967)

Approved | | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance | 10 December 1967 (USA)
A hapless loser sells his soul to the Devil in exchange for seven wishes, but has trouble winning over the girl of his dreams.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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...
...
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Alba ...
Vanity
...
Anger
...
Envy
Parnell McGarry ...
Gluttony
Danièle Noël ...
Avarice (as Daniele Noel)
Howard Goorney ...
Sloth
...
Bernard Spear ...
Irving Moses
...
Michael Trubshawe ...
Lord Dowdy
Evelyn Moore ...
Mrs. Wisby
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Storyline

Stanley is a short order cook, infatuated with Margaret, the statuesque waitress who works at Wimpy Bar with him. Despondent, he prepares to end it all when he meets George Spiggott AKA the Devil. Selling his soul for 7 wishes, Stanley tries to make Margaret his own first as an intellectual, then as a rock star, then as a wealthy industrialist. As each fails, he becomes more aware of how empty his life had been and how much more he has to live for. He also meets the seven deadly sins who try and advise him. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

soul | devil | loser | dream | waitress | See All (149) »

Taglines:

Wait till you see Dudley Moore as 'The Nun' [USA] See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 December 1967 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Stanley Donen's Bedazzled  »

Box Office

Budget:

$600,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

(at around 17 mins) After Stanley signs away his soul, Spigot files the form away under "M"; the other names he reads out from the files while finding Moon's place are Niccolò Machiavelli, Senator Joseph McCarthy, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Miller (presumably a reference to their Beyond the Fringe (1964) colleague Jonathan Miller) and Moses ("Irving Moses, the fruiterer"). See more »

Goofs

A lot of the outside scenes have clearly been dubbed afterwards to cut down on background noise. See more »

Quotes

George Spiggott: You realize that suicide's a criminal offense. In less enlightened times they'd have hung you for it.
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Crazy Credits

The film ends with God laughing at the devil; God's laughter continues intermittently throughout the closing credits. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Andy Hamilton's Search for Satan (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Italy
Composed by Dudley Moore
Performed by Dudley Moore Trio
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User Reviews

Why are people so very, very stupid?
19 January 2003 | by (nyc) – See all my reviews

Not even going to discuss the movie at length - it's brilliantly funny; see it. I'll admit I DID have an additional comment or two to make, but then I read these IMDb reviews and sank into depression.

Do the people who "critique" 30, 40, 50-year-old movies by pointing out that "duhh, it's DATED!" imagine they're applying some kind of rigorous critical standard? Why not simply save valuable time, and pixels, by submitting a "review" stating, "This film cannot overcome the handicap of not taking place in 2003. Where are the SUVs? Where are the cell phones? And why wasn't it shot on the street where I live?"

And I'm fairly sure the guy who complained of the "snotty English accents" that ruined his BEDAZZLED viewing experience is the same fellow who lives in the White House and coined "strategery".


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