IMDb > Umberto D. (1952)
Umberto D.
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Umberto D. (1952) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
8.2/10   13,609 votes »
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MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Contact:
View company contact information for Umberto D. on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 November 1955 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A elderly man and his dog struggle to survive on his government pension in Rome. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 3 wins & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(29 articles)
‘Guys and Dolls’ Joins Venice Classics Line-up
 (From Variety - Film News. 15 July 2014, 7:20 AM, PDT)

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 (From Slackerwood. 9 August 2013, 12:00 PM, PDT)

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 (From Obsessed with Film. 8 May 2013, 4:33 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
"Wherever you go, I'll be here." See more (73 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Carlo Battisti ... Umberto Domenico Ferrari
Maria Pia Casilio ... Maria, la servetta
Lina Gennari ... Antonia Belloni - la padrona di case
Ileana Simova ... La donna nella camera di Umberto
Elena Rea ... La suora all' ospedale
Memmo Carotenuto ... Il degente all' ospedale
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alberto Albani Barbieri ... L'amico di Antonia (uncredited)
Pasquale Campagnola ... (uncredited)
Riccardo Ferri ... (uncredited)

Lamberto Maggiorani ... (uncredited)
De Silva ... Battistini (uncredited)
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Directed by
Vittorio De Sica 
 
Writing credits
Cesare Zavattini (story and screenplay)

Produced by
Giuseppe Amato .... producer (as Amato)
Vittorio De Sica .... producer (as De Sica)
Angelo Rizzoli .... producer (as Rizzoli)
 
Original Music by
Alessandro Cicognini 
 
Cinematography by
G.R. Aldo  (as G. R. Aldo)
 
Film Editing by
Eraldo Da Roma 
 
Production Design by
Virgilio Marchi 
 
Set Decoration by
Ferdinando Ruffo 
 
Production Management
Nino Misiano .... production manager
Roberto Moretti .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Luisa Alessandri .... first assistant director
Franco Montemurro .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Italo Tomassi .... construction department head (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Ennio Sensi .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Angelo Pennoni .... still photographer
Giuseppe Rotunno .... camera operator
Nino Cristiani .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Giuseppe Tinelli .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Marcella Benvenuti .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Organizzaione Rizzi .... orchestra
 
Other crew
Pasquale Misiano .... production secretary
 
Thanks
Umberto De Sica .... dedicatee
 

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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
There are two dogs used in the film. The trained one has a black head and its right side is white. Another dog, with a white muzzle and a black spot on its right flank, is used in two scenes - firstly, when Umberto is hiding from the police after the demonstration and, secondly, when he reclaims Flike from the pound.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the kitchen of the landlady, when Umberto is chatting with the maid, she makes fire with a newspaper to get rid of the ants. After a few moments, we see that the newspaper is almost completely on fire, but in the next shot, less than half of the newspaper is on fire.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Pennies from Heaven (1981)See more »

FAQ

Is this movie based on a novel?
When does this story take place?
Who played Flike?
See more »
33 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
"Wherever you go, I'll be here.", 10 August 2003
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

As I watched Umberto D., by Oscar nominated actor and legendary Oscar winning director Vittorio De Sica, I knew clearly one thing for certain- Carlo Battisti, playing the role of retired civil servant Umberto Domenico Ferrari, is the most convincing non-professional actor in any given decade of European movie-making. He knows the purpose De Sica is after within every ounce of his soul (one can see it repeatedly in his eyes, the small mannerisms)- this is a story of loss, sad yet in an outlook and outcome that is cruel up to a point and never fiddles with the viewer's emotions dishonestly. Therefore, one can see him, in a sense, for what he is- he's us, merely you and I at the end of our lines of life with one wrong step sent to us after another.

Battisti's Umberto is retired, known fairly among his past employees, and living in a dank, infested one room who seems to be on the standard downward spiral for such a neo-realist effort (indeed, like The Bicycle Thief, many of the elements against him are from society's natural pitfalls). His health starts to go, as he gets a fever, and is sent unsympathetically to the hospital and returns to find the place being torn at each wall. The landlady wants him out, since she will only accept full rent instead of partial rent, and the maid of the house (Maria Pia-Casillo), while kind and friendly, lives in a similar prism of fear and emptiness. However, even she can't help him in the financial difficulties. This leads him out into the streets outside of Rome, where the film plays out like a Chaplin movie, without the humor and female companion- only with his best friend in the world, a little dog named Flag.

By the 3rd act of this epitome of heartbreaker movie-making, a quote passed through my head that Michelangelo Antonionni once stated: The actor is a moving object. That sentence, I can guess, is true of Battisti, as well as for his little dog. Aldo Graziati's camera follows him and his companion like another piece of the frame, which makes our focus on them all the more compelling. They're just their, acting the ways an old man and his pet act with one another, which is care and devotion. Battisti, in turn, delivers for De Sica an over-whelming performance of emotion. The very last scene is one of the definitive milestones of the movement at the time in Italy - despite it all; a relationship between a man and his "best friend" can be stronger in desperate times than a man can have with a fellow human being. Truly, this ending is quite suitable for one of the best films of it's time, and for De Sica a memorial tribute to his father. A++

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I change my mind egibest_egi
400+ people are idiots freejunkmail2004
Post WWII neo-realism... BlueLeaves
Umberto D. or Bicycle Thieves? szcibula
Why is this not in the top 250? kurtangle83
3 Things about this movie that will stay with me Mastiff-Fan
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