IMDb > Umberto D. (1952)
Umberto D.
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Umberto D. (1952) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 17 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
8.2/10   13,639 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Contact:
View company contact information for Umberto D. on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 November 1955 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A elderly man and his dog struggle to survive on his government pension in Rome. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 3 wins & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(29 articles)
‘Guys and Dolls’ Joins Venice Classics Line-up
 (From Variety - Film News. 15 July 2014, 7:20 AM, PDT)

Movies This Week: August 9-15, 2013
 (From Slackerwood. 9 August 2013, 12:00 PM, PDT)

10 Most Iconic Foreign Language Filmmakers
 (From Obsessed with Film. 8 May 2013, 4:33 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
The best of the Italian neo-realist films See more (73 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Carlo Battisti ... Umberto Domenico Ferrari
Maria Pia Casilio ... Maria, la servetta
Lina Gennari ... Antonia Belloni - la padrona di case
Ileana Simova ... La donna nella camera di Umberto
Elena Rea ... La suora all' ospedale
Memmo Carotenuto ... Il degente all' ospedale
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alberto Albani Barbieri ... L'amico di Antonia (uncredited)
Pasquale Campagnola ... (uncredited)
Riccardo Ferri ... (uncredited)

Lamberto Maggiorani ... (uncredited)
De Silva ... Battistini (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Vittorio De Sica 
 
Writing credits
Cesare Zavattini (story and screenplay)

Produced by
Giuseppe Amato .... producer (as Amato)
Vittorio De Sica .... producer (as De Sica)
Angelo Rizzoli .... producer (as Rizzoli)
 
Original Music by
Alessandro Cicognini 
 
Cinematography by
G.R. Aldo  (as G. R. Aldo)
 
Film Editing by
Eraldo Da Roma 
 
Production Design by
Virgilio Marchi 
 
Set Decoration by
Ferdinando Ruffo 
 
Production Management
Nino Misiano .... production manager
Roberto Moretti .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Luisa Alessandri .... first assistant director
Franco Montemurro .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Italo Tomassi .... construction department head (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Ennio Sensi .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Angelo Pennoni .... still photographer
Giuseppe Rotunno .... camera operator
Nino Cristiani .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Giuseppe Tinelli .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Marcella Benvenuti .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Organizzaione Rizzi .... orchestra
 
Other crew
Pasquale Misiano .... production secretary
 
Thanks
Umberto De Sica .... dedicatee
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Many in the film's cast were new to acting, including Carlo Battisti and Maria Pia Casilio, the two principal actors. Others, including Umberto's cruel landlady, Antonia (Lina Gennari), were established professional actors.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: The position of Umberto's bag on the seat changes between the scenes whilst he is trying to give Flike way and when he returns from the railway line.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Pennies from Heaven (1981)See more »

FAQ

Is this movie based on a novel?
When does this story take place?
Who played Flike?
See more »
61 out of 65 people found the following review useful.
The best of the Italian neo-realist films, 16 June 2005
Author: kwongers from USA

Vittorio DeSica's wonderful "Umberto D" was one of the last films of the Italian neo-realism movement and by far its best one. It is also one of my favorite movies ever. The movie's premise is simple: it is a slice of the life of a poor lonely pensioner, Umberto. Throughout the movie, we see Umberto struggle to find money to pay rent to his horrible landlady, love his dog Flike, and deal with the loneliness and disillusionment of the postwar era.

"Umberto D" is a character-driven film. It works very well because of its sharp observations on loneliness and poignant gestures. The gestures evoke powerful feelings without necessitating dialogue. Many of the scenes, even the ones that do not necessarily advance the plot, are hypnotically beautiful in their simplicity. Take, for example, a beautiful scene where Umberto finally needs to beg for money but cannot physically bring himself to do it. He extends his palm up, but when a passer-by stops to give him money, Umberto quickly flips his hand over, as if testing for rain. The film is full of these small gestures that quietly emphasize the desperate loneliness and poignancy of Umberto's situation.

The acting in this film is absolutely superb. Carlo Battisti, despite having never acted before, is wonderful as the titular character; his face is a fascinating blend of stubborn dignity and weariness of life. Maria Pia-Casilio, who plays the maid, is just as good as evoking life's loneliness and quiet desperation. The supporting cast is also very strong.

One of the very few criticisms I have heard of this film is that it is too sentimental and borderline sappy. While some scenes with Umberto and his dog Flike are sentimental, never is it "too" sentimental. DeSica knows how far he can push his film without making it sappy, and he wisely shows it as it is. Nothing feels forced. The subject material itself and the simplicity in which it is presented will bring tears. (If you don't cry in this movie, you need to have your heart professionally de-thawed.) But "Umberto D" is never dumbed down into sappiness and clichéd corniness. It is a very powerful film.

"Umberto D" is the masterpiece of the Italian neo-realist era. It's a rather bleak and very realistic movie, but it makes some fascinating commentary on the human condition, specifically the loneliness we face. Highly, highly recommended. 10/10.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (73 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Umberto D. (1952)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
I change my mind egibest_egi
400+ people are idiots freejunkmail2004
Post WWII neo-realism... BlueLeaves
Umberto D. or Bicycle Thieves? szcibula
Why is this not in the top 250? kurtangle83
3 Things about this movie that will stay with me Mastiff-Fan
See more »

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb Italy section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.