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Werewolf of London
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Werewolf of London (1935) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.4/10   2,803 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
John Colton (screenplay)
Robert Harris (story)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Werewolf of London on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
13 May 1935 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Beware! Terror strikes in the night! See more »
Plot:
The juice of a rare Tibetan flower is the only thing that keeps Dr. Glendon from turning into a werewolf during a full moon. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
The Curse of the Werewolf See more (69 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Henry Hull ... Dr. Glendon

Warner Oland ... Dr. Yogami

Valerie Hobson ... Lisa Glendon
Lester Matthews ... Paul Ames
Lawrence Grant ... Sir Thomas Forsythe

Spring Byington ... Miss Ettie Coombes
Clark Williams ... Hugh Renwick
J.M. Kerrigan ... Hawkins
Charlotte Granville ... Lady Forsythe

Ethel Griffies ... Mrs. Whack
Zeffie Tilbury ... Mrs. Moncaster
Jeanne Bartlett ... Daisy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Reginald Barlow ... Timothy, Falden Caretaker (uncredited)
Egon Brecher ... Priest (uncredited)
Wong Chung ... Coolie (uncredited)
J. Gunnis Davis ... Detective (uncredited)
Herbert Evans ... Detective Evans (uncredited)
Eole Galli ... The Prima Donna (uncredited)
Helena Grant ... Mother (uncredited)
Jeffrey Hassel ... Alf, Zoo Guard (uncredited)
Boyd Irwin ... Hotel Manager (uncredited)
Noel Kennedy ... Boy (uncredited)
George Kirby ... Detective (uncredited)
Connie Leon ... Millie, Yogami's Housekeeper (uncredited)
Maude Leslie ... Mrs. Charteris (uncredited)
James May ... Barman (uncredited)
William Millman ... John Bull (uncredited)
Roseollo Navello ... Maid (uncredited)
Amber Norman ... Streetwalker (uncredited)
Joseph North ... Plimpton, Glendon Butler (uncredited)
Tempe Pigott ... Drunk Woman (uncredited)
Harry Stubbs ... Officer Jenkins (uncredited)
David Thursby ... Photographer (uncredited)
Louis Vincenot ... Head Coolie (uncredited)
Beal Wong ... Coolie (uncredited)
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Directed by
Stuart Walker 
 
Writing credits
John Colton (screenplay)

Robert Harris (story)

Harvey Gates  uncredited (adaptation)
Robert Harris  adaptation (uncredited)
Edmund Pearson  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
Stanley Bergerman .... executive producer
Robert Harris .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Karl Hajos 
 
Cinematography by
Charles J. Stumar  (photographed by) (as Charles Stumar)
 
Film Editing by
Russell F. Schoengarth  (as Russell Schoengarth)
Milton Carruth (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Makeup Department
Mary Dolor .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Jack P. Pierce .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Armand Triller .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles S. Gould .... assistant director (uncredited)
Phil Karlson .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Robert Laszlo .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Frank Artman .... boom operator (uncredited)
Donald Cunliffe .... sound recordist (uncredited)
Gilbert Kurland .... sound supervisor (uncredited)
Bob Richards .... sound mixer (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
John P. Fulton .... special effects
David S. Horsley .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
 
Stunts
George DeNormand .... stunt double: Henry Hull (uncredited)
Harvey Parry .... stunt double: Henry Hull (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
E. Brown .... grip (uncredited)
A. Buckley .... grip (uncredited)
Maury Gertsman .... camera operator (uncredited)
Lester Kahn .... grip (uncredited)
John J. Martin .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Irving Smith .... set lighting foreman (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Maurice Pivar .... supervising editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Gilbert Kurland .... music supervisor
Karl Hajos .... conductor (uncredited)
Abe Meyer .... music coordinator (uncredited)
Heinz Roemheld .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Carl Laemmle .... presenter
Carl Laemmle .... president: Universal Pictures
Archie Hall .... technical director (uncredited)
Aben Kandel .... screenplay construction contributor (uncredited)
Billy Moritz .... production secretary (uncredited)
James Mulhauser .... screenplay construction contributor (uncredited)
Selma Platt .... production secretary (uncredited)
Jean Raymond .... script clerk (uncredited)
Mary West .... child welfare worker (uncredited)
Muriel Yoemans .... secretary to director (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
75 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-11 (2004) | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1936) (passed with cuts) | Spain:13 | Sweden:7 | USA:Approved (PCA #714)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The "original theatrical trailer" provided as a bonus feature on the DVD is actually the re-edited 1935 trailer, with only Henry Hull and Valerie Hobson identified by name, and a Realart re-release title card prepared for the 1951 re-issue. Scenes with Warner Oland are prominently featured but his name never appears, a typical attempt to disguise the age of the film, since Oland had been dead for many years by the time it was re-released.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: It is stated that people change into werewolves during the full moon, yet they mention that the characters will turn into werewolves for the next four nights. A full moon does not last four nights in a row, it happens only once every 29 or 30 days.See more »
Quotes:
Dr. Yogami:Good day. But remember this Dr. Glendon, the werewolf instinctively seeks to kill the thing it loves best.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Top 10 Lost Horror Films (2010) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
MusicSee more »

FAQ

Is the Mariphasa lupina lumina a real flower?
What is 'Werewolf of London' about?
What language is being spoken by the villagers in the opening scenes in Tibet?
See more »
12 out of 13 people found the following review useful.
The Curse of the Werewolf, 3 July 2001
Author: lugonian from Kissimmee, Florida

"The Werewolf of London" (Universal, 1935), directed by Stuart Walker, adds to another roaster of Universal's collection of movie monsters of the 1930s, this time a werewolf. Six years before Lon Chaney Jr. made a lasting impression as "The Wolf Man" (1941), followed by sequels, this early rendition about a man cursed with werewolfism comes off pretty well, in spite of the absence of the usual horror names of Boris Karloff or Bela Lugosi in the leads. In fact, without the usual actors of previous horror movies of that era, this one stands on its own merits.

Henry Hull (1890-1977), a character actor with decades of movie roles to his credit, seems to be quite unlikely to be chosen to perform not only in a lead performance (there were so few to his long film credit), but in the title role. Unlike Karloff or Lugosi, Hull never remained associated or type-cast with horror roles during the duration of his career, and like Claude Rains, the star of "The Invisible Man" (1933), Hull was able to perform in diversified roles, in spite that he never got any recognition worthy of receiving an Academy Award nomination. But if Hull is to be remembered at all, it should be for his performance as what is reportedly said to be as Hollywood's first werewolf.

The story opens in Tibet with middle-aged Wilfred Glendon (Henry Hull), a Botanist, who discovers an extraordinary flower, but after he retrieves it, he is suddenly attacked by some strange creature, but Glendon manages to get it away, coming off with some scratches on his arm. Back in his London laboratory, Glendon works on his experiments and close study of the plant, much to the dismay of his lovely but younger wife, Lisa (Valerie Hobson). She feels somewhat neglected but later finds something to occupy her time after she reacquaints herself with one of the visiting guests, Paul Ames (Lester Matthews), an older gentleman who was once her former sweetheart of years past. While conducting his study, Glendon agrees to let Lisa spend some of her free time with Ames, which eventually causes Glendon to become a little jealous. Also seen attending Glendon's open house exhibits is a mysterious man named Doctor Yogami (Warner Oland) who takes a special interest in Glendon's rare flower find. Yogami tells Glendon the background of this flower which is known for combating werewolves. Of course Glendon thinks Yogami is crazy and refuses to believe such a tale, but then begins to have second thoughts when, during a full moon evening, Glendon, sitting in his reading room, starts to notice hairs growing on his arms, body and face (which causes his pet cat to hump its back and start hissing), finding Glendon unable to control his inner emotions as he prowls the streets of London to commit some ghastly murders. But before the story comes to a somewhat rushed climax, Glendon learns the true dark secret about Doctor Yogami.

Aside from some tense moments, the movie features "comedy relief" headed by Spring Byington as Aunt Ettie, who, in one scene, becomes nauseous after witnessing a live frog being fed to a man-eating-flower; Ethel Griffies and Zeffie Tilbury as two old drunken and very nosy English floosies who have their usual "friendly" disagreements while managing both bar and upstairs apartments; Lawrence Grant and Charlotte Granville as Mr. and Mrs. Forsythe; among others. This review shouldn't go without commenting on its fine transformation scene(s) of Hull as he changes into a werewolf little by little while walking behind some pillars, with the buildup of the underscoring to the final outlook of Hull's appearance as the werewolf, compliments of make-up expert, Jack Pierce.

"The Werewolf of London" can be found as a video movie rental, and was formerly shown on both the Sci-Fi Channel and American Movie Classics prior to 2001. No classic horror movie fan should go without seeing this almost forgotten horror gem, especially on Halloween or on a cold rainy Saturday night. Unlike other horror films from that period, this one produced no sequels. Maybe I could be thankful for that. (**1/2)

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