6.2/10
70,783
725 user 203 critic

Solaris (2002)

A troubled psychologist is sent to investigate the crew of an isolated research station orbiting a bizarre planet.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
2,286 ( 49)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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...
...
...
...
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DBA Emissary #1
...
DBA Emissary #2
Shane Skelton ...
Gibarian's Son
Donna Kimball ...
Mrs. Gibarian
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Friend #1
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Friend #2
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Patient #1 (as Kent D. Faulcon)
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Patient #2 (as Lauren M. Cohn)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Tony Clemons ...
Dinner Guest
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Storyline

Dr. Gibarian, part of a team at a space station studying Solaris, makes an urgent and self-described bizarre video request to his friend, civilian psychiatrist Dr. Chris Kelvin, to come to the station to deal with an unspecified phenomenon aboard, that phenomenon with which Chris' experience and background may be able to explain and solve. Chris learns that his trip is sanctioned by the space program as a security force had been sent to the station to investigate, that security team which is now missing. When Chris arrives at the station, he finds only two surviving team members, Drs. Gordon and Snow (Dr. Gibarian committed suicide), who are both acting nervously. Chris also finds two unexpected people there, the first, who Chris only sees fleetingly, being Dr. Gibarian's adolescent son Michael, and the second being Chris' deceased wife, Rheya. Chris and Rheya had a passionate relationship in all its good and bad before she committed suicide. Apparently, these appearances of loved ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

How far will you go for a second chance? See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 on appeal for sexuality/nudity, brief language and thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 November 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Соларис  »

Box Office

Budget:

$47,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$6,752,722 (USA) (1 December 2002)

Gross:

$14,970,038 (USA) (9 February 2003)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| | (8 channels)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Rhea is also the name of Saturn's ninth moon. (From Greek mythology; she's the daughter of Gaia and Uranus, the wife of Cronos and the mother of Zeus) See more »

Goofs

George Clooney is shown traveling in a sleek slightly futuristic rapid transit train but the rear projection/blue screen out the window clearly shows the current day "Merchandise Mart" station of the Chicago CTA Subway. Also during his journey the train he passes going the opposite direction is a present day subway train. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Chris's memories, in voiceover]
Rheya Kelvin: Chris, what is it? I love you so much. Don't you love me anymore?
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Crazy Credits

There are no credits at the beginning. All the credits are at the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cargo (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Eronel
Written by Thelonious Monk, Idrees Sulieman and Sadik Hakim
Performed by Thelonious Monk
Courtesy of Columbia Records
By arrangementy with Sony Music Licensing
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Powerful, thought-provoking metaphysical journey - A great remake.
4 May 2005 | by (Vulcan) – See all my reviews

My two favorite examples of Hollywood utterly destroying GREAT foreign films are Vanilla Sky and City of Angels, which were abominations of two of my favorite films - Open Your Eyes and Wings of Desire. If you've seen Tarkovsky's brilliant "Solyaris" this film will seem more like an Americanized tribute than a Hollywoodization of a great piece of Soviet cinema. Some will likely ask why Soderbergh bothered to make this film if he couldn't improve on the original. Personally, I could not care less. This is a great film, and shows that it is possible for Americans to remake classic non-American films sensitively, intelligently and well.

To cut to the chase - if you like sci-fi with a soul,which stretches the boundaries of imagination, explores the uncharted realms of the human condition as much as the unknown realities of the universe, and swims upstream against the currents of ethics, physics, and even metaphysics, you will probably enjoy this moody, slow, multi-leveled and heavily textured film. If you're looking for light entertainment, stay away from this. This is a slow, intense film - dominated by dialog

  • and there is no action to speak of. Also, you need to let this movie
pour into you slowly, so if you're not in the right frame of mind to pay attention and be receptive, you should save it for another occasion.

The cast is exceptionally good. This is unequivocally the best performance I have seen out of George Clooney, but the supporting cast and the female lead all blew me away. Soderbergh does have a talent for making actor's look good, even mediocre actors, but there is nothing mediocre about any of the performances in this film.

Though I recognize his talent, Soderberg's dialogical technique has worn particularly thin with me. The once fresh fast-paced, rapid-fire cuts and close-ups with the low-toned exchange of sentence fragments, and the myriad Soderberg imitators, particularly in television crime drama, have really gotten on my nerves. Solaris, however, is a bit different. There are only a few "Soderbergh moments" in this rich remake of the classic bit of 1970s soviet SciFi "Solyaris". Both films are based on a novella by the brilliant Stanislaw Lem. This film, perhaps even more than Tarkovsky's 1972 edgy, dark, and intense original, will appeal to exactly the sort of movie-goer that Lem's writing appeals to. Neither film captures Lem's quirky sense of humor. I am quite glad that Soderbergh chose to make Solaris with very much the same atmospheric eeriness, plot, and intellectual and emotional depth as the original. It is a tribute to his artistic integrity that he recognizes the brilliance of the original work, and imitates it wherever he can do no better, adding subtle and appropriate nuances and embellishments to make it his own. Some examples are the wonderfully minimalistic soundtrack, and the very Soderbergh symbolic use of lighting and color saturation to shift from the retrospective to the live-action shot. Perhaps the best tribute I can give this film is the fact that I am going to watch the original again in a few days for comparative purposes.

In other words, this isn't going to be for everybody, nor, even, for most. I am hardly surprised by the very low (in my opinion) ratings received by this film here on IMDb. Solaris is a love story, a story of exploring the fringes of sanity, and of questioning the very nature of reality, and much more. Enjoy it!


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