IMDb > Jubilee (1978)
Jubilee
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Jubilee (1978) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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Director:
Writer:
Derek Jarman (writer)
Contact:
View company contact information for Jubilee on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
September 1979 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Sex, drugs and punk rock. Add violence and time travel and you have Jubilee.
Plot:
Queen Elizabeth I travels to late twentieth-century Britain to discover a tawdry and depressing landscape... See more » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
History, theology and science fiction backed by screaming polemic and ferocious intent See more (38 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Jenny Runacre ... Queen Elizabeth I / Bod

Nell Campbell ... Crabs (as Little Nell)

Toyah Willcox ... Mad
Jordan ... Amyl Nitrite
Hermine Demoriane ... Chaos

Ian Charleson ... Angel

Karl Johnson ... Sphinx
Linda Spurrier ... Viv
Neil Kennedy ... Max
Jack Birkett ... Borgia Ginz (as Orlando)
Jayne County ... Lounge Lizard (as Wayne County)

Richard O'Brien ... John Dee
David Brandon ... Ariel (as David Haughton)
Helen Wellington-Lloyd ... Lady in Waiting

Adam Ant ... Kid
Claire Davenport ... First Customs Lady
Donald Dunham ... Policeman
Iris Fry ... Bingo lady
Quinn Hawkins ... Boy
Barney James ... Policeman
Lindsay Kemp ... Cabaret performer
Ulla Larson-Styles ... Waitress
Howard Malin ... Schmeitzer
Luciana Martínez ... Escort to Borgia
William Merrow ... Maurice
Gene October ... Happy Days
Prudence Walters ... Escort to Borgia
Joyce Windsor ... Bingo Lady
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Steven Severin ... Himself (as Siouxsie and the Banshees)
Ari Up ... Herself
Duggie Fields ... Party-goer (uncredited)
Siouxsie Sioux ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Derek Jarman 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Derek Jarman  writer

Produced by
Howard Malin .... co-producer
James Whaley .... co-producer
 
Original Music by
Brian Eno 
 
Cinematography by
Peter Middleton 
 
Film Editing by
Nick Barnard 
 
Production Design by
Mordecai Schreiber 
 
Costume Design by
Dave Henderson 
Christopher Hobbs 
 
Makeup Department
Keith of 'Smile' .... hair stylist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Guy Ford .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Kenny Morriss .... assistant production designer
 
Sound Department
Mike Billing .... dubbing mixer
John Hayes .... sound recordist
Trevor Rutherford .... assistant sound recordist
 
Special Effects by
John Dee .... special effects
Martin Gutteridge .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Denis Balkin .... grip
Bob McShane .... assistant camera
Mike Munro .... electrician
Jean-Marc Prouveur .... still photographer
John Rogers .... gaffer
Johnny Rosza .... still photographer
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Richard Croft .... costume maker
Ralph Dyer .... costume maker
Luciana Martínez .... wardrobe mistress
 
Editorial Department
Annette D'Alton .... assistant editor
Tom Priestley .... supervising editor
 
Transportation Department
John Albery .... transportation
 
Other crew
Lee Drysdale .... production assistant
Judi Futrille .... continuity
Lindsay Kemp .... cabaret performance
Luciana Martínez .... production assistant
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
106 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In her opening speech, Amyl Nitrate tells us that her favourite song is "Don't Dream It, Be It". That song was written for The Rocky Horror Show (filmed as The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)) by co-star Richard O'Brien, who plays court magician John Dee.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: After the policemen shoot Angel and Sphinx dead, Sphinx's eyes blink before the camera cuts away.See more »
Quotes:
Angel:You clammy slag! You sat on the KY with your fat arse!See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Rule BritanniaSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
10 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
History, theology and science fiction backed by screaming polemic and ferocious intent, 8 April 2008
Author: Graham Greene from United Kingdom

Derek Jarman's Jubilee (1977) is a bleak work of ferocious vision and bold satirical intent, far removed from the director's more intellectual or painterly works, such as Caravaggio (1986), War Requiem (1989), Edward II (1991) and Wittgenstein (1993). It could also be seen as something of a precursor to the visceral aggression and cultural desolation presented in his later project, The Last of England (1987), which presented a similar sense of outrage and impressionist image-weaving, albeit, without the broader strokes of character. With this film, Jarman mixes his own social and political ideologies with the ideas at the forefront of punk; taking both the sense of liberation and the dangerous sense of apathy and aggression presented in both the style and the attitude of that particular era, and applying it to a story that involves elements of history, theology and science fiction.

With the juxtaposition of ideas, Jarman presents us with the alarming vision of England in decline; seeing the present by way of the past, and further depicting a dystopian future very much reminiscent of our own. The story is given a further ironic twist by presenting the image of Queen Elisabeth I as she journeys to the future of late 70's Britain on the eve of the Silver Jubilee, and finds a world in which punk terrorists have taken over the streets, rampaging through shopping centres, looting houses and generally giving a grubby two-fingered salute to anyone courageous enough to represents the mindless masses or the ultra chic bourgeoisie. Certainly, with these factors in mind, Jubilee is not an easy film to appreciate on any level, with the brutality of the imagery and the shocking vulgarity of the world as it is presented being incredibly bleak and incredibly prescient; whilst the visualisation of the film is brash, jarring, clearly exploitative and generally rough around the edges.

The film wallows in sordidness for the first half-hour, as we watch characters wandering through a sadistic wasteland engaging in sex, violence and murder. However, this limited description might lead certain audiences to expect a gritty action film that presents violence as entertainment and coolly ironic characters akin to Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971) and Walter Hill's The Warriors (1979), in which street violence and dystopia are presented as chin-scratching entertainment. Jubilee makes no attempt to entertain the audience on a conventional level, instead offering a serious statement of intent. If you want to enjoy Jubilee, or any of Jarman's work, you must do so on his terms, not on your own. To call it a punk film is misleading too. Here, the appropriation of the punk ethos seems satirical, rather than genuine. Obviously Jarman wasn't a punk and wasn't even of the generation, but he clearly saw something within the scene, again, be it in the liberating freedom that punk could offer, or in the apathy and aggression that came as a direct result of the political climate of the time.

In fact, the film seems purposely stylised to conform to the fashion of the punk rock-status quo in an almost ironic manner that stresses the director's cynical, satirical intent. The cast for example reads like the veritable who's who of seventies cult, with characters Lindsay Kemp, Jenny Runacre, Little Nell, Wayne Country, Richard O'Brien, Jordan, Toyah and Adam Ant all popping up to deliver disarming performances; part pantomime/part existential theatre. The second half of the film wanders slightly; there are examinations on sexuality, a prolonged attack on the music industry and brutal violence between the punks and police which causes both sides to question the immoral decadence being flaunted in the name of rebellion. There are also musical numbers, political manifestos, agitprop, and screaming polemic as well as an extraordinarily vivid sequences shot on fuzzy 8mm film, featuring Jordan dressed as a ballerina dancing in a junkyard.

It's one of the most grimly beautiful and evocative images that Jarman ever created; that sense of true tranquil beauty against a vicious, decaying urban wasteland. A moment of quiet reflection within a film of ferocious energy and aggression and yet tinged with a great sense of sadness and theatrical melancholia. It somehow puts the entire film into context, uniting all facets of the film beyond the past present and future and yet still retaining a great sense of nostalgia and reflection. This one seemingly abstract sequences manages to go beyond the merely aesthetic to offer the ultimate visual metaphor of the punk spirit, England in the 70's and Jubilee itself.

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MASTURBATORY PSUEDO ABSURDIST STUPIDITY tfox45-1
When was Jubilee first released on VHS? tookoo
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Amyl Nitrate's song canadian_cutie894
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