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Kiss Me Monster (1969)

Küss mich, Monster (original title)
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Blue Underground proudly presents these psychedelic spy spoofs featuring the bold and beautiful detective duo The Red Lips! KISS ME, MONSTER finds the girls moonlighting on a striptease ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Diana (as Janine Renaud)
Rosanna Yanni ...
Regina (as Rossana Yanni)
Chris Howland ...
Francis McClune
Michel Lemoine ...
Jacques Maurier
Manuel Velasco ...
Andy (as Manolo Velasco)
Manolo Otero ...
Dimitri (as Manuel Otero)
Ana Casares ...
Linda
Adrian Hoven ...
Eric Vicas
Marta Reves ...
Irina
Barta Barri ...
Inspektor Kramer
María Antonia Redondo ...
Bulumba
...
Abilene's Contact Man
Dorit Dom ...
Anita (as Maria Dom)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Fernando de Rojas
Carlos Mendy
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Storyline

Blue Underground proudly presents these psychedelic spy spoofs featuring the bold and beautiful detective duo The Red Lips! KISS ME, MONSTER finds the girls moonlighting on a striptease world tour - but no sooner do they hit the stage than the girls are up to their pasties in stiffs, Satanists and Sapphic sadists, all after a secret formula for human clones! But if The Red Lips can get to it first, will they still be able to survive the dangers lurking around every corner?

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Her last kiss...a horror worse than dying See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Mystery

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

March 1975 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Kiss Me Monster  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Connections

Featured in Call Him Jess (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
KISS ME MONSTER {U.S. And Spanish Versions} (Jesus Franco, 1967) **
13 February 2007 | by (Naxxar, Malta) – See all my reviews

The follow-up to TWO UNDERCOVER ANGELS (1967) is even less successful than its predecessor but, again, it's enjoyable enough along the way to be generally palatable. The plot of this one is even more nonsensical than that of the first film: as a matter of fact, in the featurette accompanying TWO UNDERCOVER ANGELS on the Blue Underground DVD, Franco himself calls it "surreal" and believes this to have been the reason why KISS ME MONSTER wasn't as popular as the original!

Anyway, here we have sci-fi rather than horror elements - the creation of superhuman beings, which actually makes the film's very title a misnomer, but is also not all that different from the central idea of Franco's earlier Al Pereira adventure ATTACK OF THE ROBOTS (1966)! Besides, the leads themselves - Janine Reynaud and Rosanna Yanni - didn't seem quite as charming here: for one thing, they never get to wear the fetishistic "Red Lips" costume, despite going through an equal array of kitschy dresses throughout; neither are their occasional asides to the audience in the first film retained for the follow-up. Also, their essential roles have been exchanged this time around - in TWO UNDERCOVER ANGELS, Reynaud assumed the damsel-in-distress persona (being, basically, the brains of the outfit) whom blonde bimbo Yanni managed to rescue in the nick of time; the latter is now the one who suffers the indignity of being drugged and abducted, while the former does the bailing-out! The remaining cast members are virtually the same as in TWO UNDERCOVER ANGELS (including another cameo by Franco himself), but mostly playing new roles: Adrian Hoven turns heroic for this one, whereas Michel Lemoine has graduated from monster assistant to mad scientist. Once again, the English-language soundtrack provides some truly cringe-worthy moments - such as the awful dubbing of the songs warbled on guitar by a couple of old Spaniards.

Let us now take a look at the alternate Spanish version: as can be deduced from the previous comments, the film is much better served by the Spanish dialogue. With respect to the editing, it's generally better than in EL CASO DE LAS DOS BELLEZAS: the re-arranging of scenes here is never quite as jarring as in the previous film; there is, however, one notable mistake - with the apparent utilization of a different take in the Spanish variant during the scene in which Reynaud saves Yanni from the villains' clutches, wherein one of these is shot dead by her in the U.S. version but not the Spanish...only to show his lifeless body slumped on the sofa seconds later! Likewise, the alternate music score (again by Fernando Garcia Morcillo) suits the sequel better than the first film, given the lesser emphasis on pop-art references this time around in order to make way for an exploration into ancient Spanish culture - what with a subplot involving a secret society of Klansmen types and the "McGuffin" in the film, the all-important red case, concealed inside a windmill whose key resides in the notes on a sheet of music.

The silly opening sequence to the U.S. version has been dropped (but, then, the use of a different credit sequence for the Spanish print means that an effective transition from black-and-white into color had to be sacrificed as well - since a character in the film is named Vittorio Freda, which I assume to be a nod to Italian cult film-makers Vittorio Cottafavi and Riccardo Freda, it's possible that this gimmick was borrowed from the former's THE HUNDRED HORSEMEN [1964]); gone, too, is an endless and irrelevant go-go number. The new footage includes some additional scenes in which the "Red Lips" duo are seen interacting with the police, as they recount to them the events of the film in flashback - but there's also one murder (with the body inexplicably dumped in the heroines' bedroom) missing from the U.S. version, while the developed relationship in the Spanish print between two secondary characters helps to better delineate their individual loyalties. Besides, in spite of my limited understanding of the Spanish language, I caught a number of witty lines which were changed for the U.S. variant (including an amusing reference to Franco's own recurring creation Dr. Orloff!). The English-language version, however, does feature a few seconds of unconvincing gore not found in the Spanish counterpart.

With regards to the Blue Underground DVD itself, here too the transfer does justice to the film's colorful visuals; the Spanish version, however, wasn't up to the level of EL CASO DE LAS DOS BELLEZAS - for one thing, it seemed to be culled from two different prints, as the Aspect Ratio kept alternating (sometimes in the same scene!) between 1.66:1 and Full-Frame. The Jess Franco interview on the Blue Underground disc wasn't focused on the film proper but rather a rambling piece (albeit fascinating as ever) about various topics - the relationship between psychedelia and drugs and that between censorship and pornography; he even talks at length about his decidedly singular association with Orson Welles.


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