IMDb > Battleship Potemkin (1925)
Bronenosets Potemkin
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Battleship Potemkin (1925) More at IMDbPro »Bronenosets Potemkin (original title)

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Battleship Potemkin -- Sergei Eisenstein's masterpiece is one of the most influential silent film of all time. In this edition, dozens of missing shots have been replaced and all 146 title cards restored to Eisenstein's specifications. Edmund Meisel's definitive 1926 orchestral score returns this masterwork to a form as close to its creator's bold vision as has been seen since the film's triumphant 1925 Moscow premiere.
Battleship Potemkin -- A dramatized account of a great Russian naval mutiny and a resulting street demonstration which brought on a police massacre.


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Nina Agadzhanova (script by)
View company contact information for Battleship Potemkin on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
24 December 1925 (Soviet Union) See more »
A dramatized account of a great Russian naval mutiny and a resulting street demonstration which brought on a police massacre. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
1 win See more »
User Reviews:
A gripping story told with style and passion as well as a 'must see' piece of cinema history See more (172 total) »


  (in credits order)
Aleksandr Antonov ... Grigory Vakulinchuk
Vladimir Barsky ... Commander Golikov

Grigori Aleksandrov ... Chief Officer Giliarovsky
Ivan Bobrov ... Young Sailor Flogged While Sleeping (as I. Bobrov)
Mikhail Gomorov ... Militant Sailor
Aleksandr Levshin ... Petty Officer
N. Poltavtseva ... Woman With Pince-nez
Konstantin Feldman ... Student Agitator
Prokopenko ... Mother Carrying Wounded Boy
A. Glauberman ... Wounded Boy
Beatrice Vitoldi ... Woman With Baby Carriage
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Daniil Antonovich ... Sailor
Brodsky ... Student
Julia Eisenstein ... Woman with Food for Sailors

Sergei M. Eisenstein ... Odessa Citizen
Andrey Fayt ... Recruit (as A. Fait)
Korobei ... Legless Veteran
Marusov ... Officer
Protopopov ... Old Man
Repnikova ... Woman on the Steps
Vladimir Uralsky
Zerenin ... Student
Aleksanteri Ahola-Valo ... Extra (uncredited)

Directed by
Sergei M. Eisenstein  (as S.M. Eisenstein)
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Nina Agadzhanova  script by (as N.F. Agadzhanova-Shutko)
Nikolai Aseyev  intertitles (uncredited)
Sergei M. Eisenstein  uncredited
Sergei Tretyakov  intertitles (uncredited)

Original Music by
Eric Allaman (1986)
Yati Durant 
Vladimir Heifetz 
Nikolai Kryukov (1950)
Chris Lowe 
Edmund Meisel  (as Meisel)
Neil Tennant 
Cinematography by
Eduard Tisse (lead cinematographer)
Vladimir Popov (uncredited)
Film Editing by
Grigori Aleksandrov (re-issue) (uncredited)
Sergei M. Eisenstein (uncredited)
Art Direction by
Vasili Rakhals (uncredited)
Production Management
Brian Shirey .... production manager (2007 alternate version)
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Grigori Aleksandrov .... assistant director (as T. Aleksandrov)
Sound Department
Yevgeni Kashkevich .... sound recordist (1950 re-issue)
Editorial Department
Sala Deinema .... work print editor: Bundesarchiv-Filmarchiv, Berlin (2007 alternate version)
Ron Heidt .... title editor (2007 alternate version)
Erika Schmidt .... negative cutter: Bundesarchiv-Filmarchiv, Berlin (2007 alternate version)
Gerhard Ullmann .... colorization (2007 alternate version)
Jay Leyda .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Music Department
Helmut Imig .... conductor: Deutsches Filmorchestra Babelsberg (2007 alternate version)
Helmut Imig .... instrumentation: Edmund Meisel's 1926 score (2007 alternate version)
Helmut Imig .... music adaptor: Edmund Meisel's 1926 score (2007 alternate version)
Other crew
Aleksandr Antonov .... assistant to director (as A. Antonov)
Anna Bohn .... reconstruction collaborator (2007 alternate version)
Mikhail Gomorov .... assistant to director (as M. Gomorov)
S. Kazakov .... supervisor (1950 reissue)
A. Kotoshev .... administrator
A.P. Kryukov .... administrator
Aleksandr Levshin .... assistant to director (as A. Levshin)
Enno Patalas .... reconstruction director (2007 alternate version)
Maksim Shtraukh .... assistant to director (as M. Shtraukh)
Bret Wood .... title designer (2007 alternate version)
Hertzel Effensachs .... director: marine sequences (uncredited)

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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Bronenosets Potemkin" - Soviet Union (original title)
"Potemkin" - USA (informal title)
"The Armored Cruiser Potemkin" - USA (alternative title)
"The Battleship Potemkin" - USA (video box title)
See more »
75 min | Spain:70 min | Spain:77 min | USA:66 min | Argentina:80 min | Spain:68 min (DVD edition) | 72 min (17 fps) (Blu-ray)
Aspect Ratio:
1.25 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Argentina:Atp | Canada:G (Ontario) | Finland:K-12 (1978) | Finland:K-16 (1952) | Finland:(Banned) (1930) | Germany:12 | Germany:(Banned) (1933-1945) | Italy:T (1960) | Italy:(Banned) (1925 - 1960) | Netherlands:AL (video rating) | Norway:16 (original rating) | Portugal:M/12 (DVD rating) | Portugal:(Banned) (original rating) | Portugal:M/16 (video rating) | Portugal:17 (1974) | South Korea:15 (1994) | Spain:T | Sweden:(Banned) (original rating) | Sweden:15 (re-rating) (uncut) (1952) | Sweden:15 (re-rating) (cut) (1946) | UK:X (original rating) | UK:PG (re-rating) (1987) | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-G (TV rating)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

The flag seen flying on the ship after the crew had mutinied was white, which is the color of the tsars, but this was done so that it could be hand-painted red on the celluloid, which is the color of communism. Since this is a black-and-white film, if the flag had been red it would have shown up black in the film.See more »
Continuity: In the firing squad scene, just before the mutiny, the ship's priest taps a crucifix upon his right hand, holding it in his left. As the shot cuts to a close-up of the cross, it instantly switches hands.See more »
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86 out of 98 people found the following review useful.
A gripping story told with style and passion as well as a 'must see' piece of cinema history, 19 September 2004
Author: bob the moo from United Kingdom

With workers striking in Russia, the crew of the battleship Potemkin feel a certain kinship for the plight of their brothers. When they are served rotting, maggot infested meat some of the crew object, only to find themselves singled out and placed in front of a firing squad. With the marines seconds away from firing the deadly shots, ordinary seaman Grigory Vakulinchuk steps into the breach and intervenes to save the men by appealing to the firing squad to ignore their orders. When the officers take their revenge and kill Vakulinchuk, all are bonded together in the struggle; a bond that reaches to the city of Odessa where the rebellion grows, leading to a bloody and historic series of events.

It is hard to imagine that anybody who has seen quite a few films in the past few decades would be unaware of this film, but it is perhaps understandable that fewer have had the opportunity to actually sit down and watch. I had never seen this film before but had seen countless references to it in other films and therefore considering it an important film to at least see once. The story is based on real events and this only serves to make it more interesting but even without this context it is still an engaging story. The story doesn't have much in the way of characters but it still brings out the brutality and injustice of events and it is in this that it hooked me – surprisingly violent (implied more than modern gore) it demonising the actions and shows innocents falling at all sides in key scenes. The version I saw apparently had the original score (I'm not being snobby – modern rescores could be better for all I know) and I felt it worked very well to match and improve the film's mood; dramatic, gentle or exciting, it all works very well.

The feel of the film was a surprise to me because it stood up very well viewed with my modern eyes. At one or two points the model work was very clearly model work but mostly the film is technically impressive. The masses of extras, use of ships and cities and just the way it captures such well organised chaos are all very impressive and would be even done today. What is more impressive with time though is how the film has a very strong and very clean style to it – it is not as gritty and flat as many silent films of the period that I have seen; instead it is very crisp and feels very, very professional. Of course watching it in 2004 gives me the benefit of hindsight where I can look back over many films that have referenced the images or directors who have mentioned the film in interviews; but even without this 20:20 vision it is still possible to see how well done the film is and to note how memorable much of it is – the steps and the firing squad scenes are two very impressive moments that are very memorable. The only real thing that might bug modern audiences is the acting; it isn't bad but silent acting is very different from acting with sound. Here the actors all over act and rely on their bodies to do much of their delivery – word cards just don't do the emotional job so they have to make extra effort to deliver this.

Overall this is a classic film that has influenced many modern directors. The story is engaging and well worth hearing; the directing is crisp and professional, producing many scenes that linger in the memory; the music works to deliver the emotional edge that modern audiences would normally rely on acting and dialogue to deliver and the whole film is over all too quickly! An essential piece of cinema for those that claim to love the media but also a cracking good film in its own right.

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"I don't get it, ergo it's overrated"... Filler_Killer
Your Top ten favorite silent films SakowskyBrothers
Foreign silent films vs. American sweetkness
noone ever says about entertaining this film is teejay6682
Could This Be Taken as a Comedy? Damon_3388
Three Lions svenrufus
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