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The 13 youngest ever actors to be nominated for an Oscar

The 13 youngest ever actors to be nominated for an Oscar
Awards season always turns up note-worthy moments: showstopping outfits, witty speeches or egregious faux-pas are instantly turned into memes and circulated endlessly on social media.

In 2021, one moment in particular captivated viewers worldwide, and that was watching eight-year-old actor Alan Kim – dressed in a tuxedo – tear up while accepting a Critics Choice Award for his scene-stealing part in the critically acclaimed film Minari.

After a successful season, however, which included a Bafta nod, the young star was eventually shut out of the Oscars. It was a shame – in a year of history-making nominations for the Academy Awards, seeing Kim recognised would have been the cherry on top.

But it was always a long shot. Child actors are a welcome but infrequent inclusion at the Oscars – their rarity though, does make every instance especially memorable.

In the run-up to next month’s ceremony, here is a list of the 13 youngest stars
See full article at The Independent - Film »

Kevin O’Neal Dies: ‘No Time for Sergeants’ Actor & Ryan O’Neal’s Brother Was 77

Kevin O’Neal Dies: ‘No Time for Sergeants’ Actor & Ryan O’Neal’s Brother Was 77
Kevin O’Neal, who appeared in The Fugitive, Gunsmoke, and The Twilight Zone and was the younger brother of actor Ryan O’Neal, has died. He was 77. The news of Kevin’s passing was revealed by his nephew Patrick O’Neal, Ryan O’Neal’s son, who said he died overnight on Saturday, January 28, in his sleep in Thousand Oaks, California. “My uncle passed in his sleep and didn’t suffer for which we are thankful,” Patrick wrote on Instagram alongside a slideshow of photos of Kevin and Ryan from their younger days. “Kevin had a wicked sense of humor, just like his older brother, and we have his stories to keep him in our hearts forever.” He continued, “When Kevin walked into a room you heard him before you saw him. That energy and personality is an old O’Neal trademark. Heaven better be ready for him!” View this post on Instagram
See full article at TV Insider »

Floyd Sneed Dies: Three Dog Night Drummer Was 80

Floyd Sneed Dies: Three Dog Night Drummer Was 80
Floyd Sneed, the Canadian drummer who powered a string of 1970s hits with Three Dog Night and provided backup vocals for one of the band’s biggest hits, died January 27. He was 80.

His death was announced on the band’s Facebook page. A cause of death was not specified.

Related Story Hollywood & Media Deaths In 2023: Photo Gallery & Obituaries Related Story Kevin O'Neal Dies: 'No Time For Sergeants' Actor, Brother Of Ryan O'Neal Was 77 Related Story Tom Verlaine Dies: Influential Guitarist For Punk Group Television Was 73

“Three Dog Night is saddened to learn of the passing of Floyd Sneed,” the band statement reads. “Floyd was an absolutely wonderful human being, a complete original and a sweetheart of a man. He was also an extraordinarily unique drummer who brought so much to Three Dog Night’s sound. Floyd broke many barriers both musically and culturally; he also influenced countless other drummers with his amazing technique.
See full article at Deadline »

Kevin O’Neal Dies: ‘No Time For Sergeants’ Actor, Brother Of Ryan O’Neal Was 77

Kevin O’Neal Dies: ‘No Time For Sergeants’ Actor, Brother Of Ryan O’Neal Was  77
Kevin O’Neal, the younger brother of actor Ryan O’Neal who for a time built a steady, if less widely known, performing career of his own died in his sleep of natural causes in Thousand Oaks, California, on Saturday, Jan. 28. He was 77.

His death was announced by his nephew Patrick O’Neal, Ryan O’Neal’s son.

“Kevin had a wicked sense of humor, just like his older brother, and we have his stories to keep him in our hearts forever,” Patrick O’Neal wrote on Instagram, adding, “When Kevin walked into a room you heard him before you saw him. That energy and personality is an old O’Neal trademark. Heaven better be ready for him!”

Kevin O’Neal began his television career in the early 1960s, making guest appearances on such series as The Danny Thomas Show, The Donna Reed Show, The Twilight Zone, My Tree Son and Wagon Train.
See full article at Deadline »

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever
In a missive sent around to 2022’s Oscar nominees, stars were told to “read the room” when delivering speeches at the Academy Awards this month. Translation: Get off the stage before the orchestra is forced to awkwardly play you out.

In 1943, Greer Garson set a Guinness World Record for Longest Oscars Acceptance Speech, with her address upon accepting her Best Actress award forMrs Miniver clocking in at five and a half minutes.

Garson isn’t the only winner guilty of indulgence though. Hilary Swank, Adrien Brody and Al Pacino have all ignored the 45-second limit and consequently found themselves at the receiving end of a passive aggressive “Will you wrap this up?” stare.

Some actors, however, know that not every story needs to be so long and that brevity is an undervalued quality. Franklin D Roosevelt’s adage – “Be sincere, be brief, be seated” – could very well be the tagline for this year’s ceremony.
See full article at The Independent - Film »

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered, from Joe Pesci to Rita Moreno

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered, from Joe Pesci to Rita Moreno
In a missive sent around to 2022’s Oscar nominees, stars were told to “read the room” when delivering speeches at the Academy Awards this month. Translation: Get off the stage before the orchestra is forced to awkwardly play you out.

In 1943, Greer Garson set a Guinness World Record for Longest Oscars Acceptance Speech, with her address upon accepting her Best Actress award forMrs Miniver clocking in at five and a half minutes.

Garson isn’t the only winner guilty of indulgence though. Hilary Swank, Adrien Brody and Al Pacino have all ignored the 45-second limit and consequently found themselves at the receiving end of a passive aggressive “Will you wrap this up?” stare.

Some actors, however, know that not every story needs to be so long and that brevity is an undervalued quality. Franklin D Roosevelt’s adage – “Be sincere, be brief, be seated” – could very well be the tagline for this year’s ceremony.
See full article at The Independent - Film »

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered
In a missive sent around to last year’s Oscar nominees, stars were told to “read the room” when delivering speeches at the Academy Awards this month. Translation: Get off the stage before the orchestra is forced to awkwardly play you out.

In 1943, Greer Garson set a Guinness World Record for Longest Oscars Acceptance Speech, with her address upon accepting her Best Actress award forMrs Miniver clocking in at five and a half minutes.

Garson isn’t the only winner guilty of indulgence though. Hilary Swank, Adrien Brody and Al Pacino have all ignored the 45-second limit and consequently found themselves at the receiving end of a passive aggressive “Will you wrap this up?” stare.

Some actors, however, know that not every story needs to be so long and that brevity is an undervalued quality. Franklin D Roosevelt’s adage – “Be sincere, be brief, be seated” – could very well be
See full article at The Independent - Film »

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered from Joe Pesci to Rita Moreno

‘Thank you’: 12 of the shortest Oscars speeches ever delivered from Joe Pesci to Rita Moreno
In a missive sent around to this last year’s Oscar nominees, stars were told to “read the room” when delivering speeches at the Academy Awards this month. Translation: Get off the stage before the orchestra is forced to awkwardly play you out.

In 1943, Greer Garson set a Guinness World Record for Longest Oscars Acceptance Speech, with her address upon accepting her Best Actress award forMrs Miniver clocking in at five and a half minutes.

Garson isn’t the only winner guilty of indulgence though. Hilary Swank, Adrien Brody and Al Pacino have all ignored the 45-second limit and consequently found themselves at the receiving end of a passive aggressive “Will you wrap this up?” stare.

Some actors, however, know that not every story needs to be so long and that brevity is an undervalued quality. Franklin D Roosevelt’s adage – “Be sincere, be brief, be seated” – could very well
See full article at The Independent - Film »

Barry Lyndon Ending Explained: They Are All Equal Now

Barry Lyndon Ending Explained: They Are All Equal Now
With 1975's "Barry Lyndon," Stanley Kubrick took the constraints of the novelistic period piece and tore them apart. This adaptation of William Makepace Thackeray's novel "The Luck of Barry Lyndon" follows the rules of the so-called costume drama, the repression and restrained manners, and turns them into something else. The movie is chaotic and bitterly ironic, establishing and exploring two of Kubrick's most compelling characters over the course of its three hours.

Just before its making, Kubrick had previously explored the far reaches of space with "2001: A Space Odyssey" and the chilling causes and effects of violence with "A Clockwork Orange." Watching his movies gives the impression of a vast openness, not just in the compositions but in the staging of the characters and the viewer's flexibility of interpretation. His movies were massive and unpredictable simultaneously, inventing whole new worlds and visual languages out of nowhere. In search of something new,
See full article at Slash Film »

Michael Madsen's Most 'Fun' Film Experience Involved Killing Philip Seymour Hoffman

Michael Madsen's Most 'Fun' Film Experience Involved Killing Philip Seymour Hoffman
Showtime's "The Offer" chronicled the true story of how "The Godfather" made the unlikely leap from Mario Puzo's bestseller to a sweeping family epic that reinvented the crime genre and went on to win three Oscars. Centered around the day-to-day dealings and improbable situations that producer Albert Ruddy (Miles Teller) had to navigate to get Francis Ford Coppola's classic made, "The Offer" also highlights the glamorous and tumultuous life of legendary producer Robert Evans (Matthew Goode), the man responsible for helping Paramount Pictures become a major Hollywood player after taking a big risk on the romantic drama "Love Story" starring Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw

MacGraw and Evans married each other in 1969, a year before "Love Story" became a smash hit, sending MacGraw's star soaring. She went on to accept an unlikely role opposite Steve McQueen in "The Getaway," the Sam Peckinpah-directed high-flying heist movie written by Walter Hill.
See full article at Slash Film »

Win The Driver on Blu-ray

Win The Driver on Blu-ray
To mark the release of the 4K restoration of The Driver in cinemas from 11 November and available on Steelbook, Uhd (with poster), Blu-ray, DVD and Digital from 5 December, we’ve been given a Blu-ray copy to give away to 2 winners.

The film stars Ryan O’Neal (Love Story), Bruce Dern (Nebraska) and Isabelle Adjani (Possession). O’Neal plays a getaway driver whose exceptional talent has prevented him being caught, Dern plays the relentless detective who sets out to trap him and Adjani plays the mysterious gambler who goes along for the thrill of the game.

The neo-noir action thriller takes place in the dark streets of a deserted downtown LA and features a number of breath-taking car chase sequences, celebrated as some of the greatest in movie history, including The Driver hot-wiring a Ford to make good an escape from a casino heist, before being pursued by a succession of police
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Sheryl Crow Performs at Farrah Fawcett Foundation Tex-Mex Fiesta 2022

Sheryl Crow Performs at Farrah Fawcett Foundation Tex-Mex Fiesta 2022
The Farrah Fawcett Foundation Tex-Mex Fiesta co-chairs Alana Stewart and Jaclyn Smith led the 2022 event at The Rustic in Dallas, Texas this year, as opposed to their usual Beverly Hills location.

Sheryl Crow Performs at The Farrah Fawcett Foundation Tex-Mex Fiesta

Attended by more than 350 guests from Hollywood and Dallas, this event raised funds for the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge and Stand Up To Cancer.

The Rustic was transformed with floating pinatas, colorful lanterns, and mariachis for the fiesta-themed event, designed and produced by The James Group. Guests sat under a starry Texas sky at festive tablescapes as they enjoyed endless margaritas and Tex-Mex food (Farrah’s favorite). Guests were greeted with an opening performance by Sydney Sherrill and stylish gift bags provided by Neiman Marcus. The burlap totes were filled with several full-sized luxury products: Retrouve’s face serum, Sobel Skin moisture cream, a Knesko Nanogold Repair face mask,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Robert Redford Originally Didn’t Want to Star with Barbra Streisand in ‘The Way We Were’ Due to Her ‘Reputation’

Robert Redford Originally Didn’t Want to Star with Barbra Streisand in ‘The Way We Were’ Due to Her ‘Reputation’
Hubbell’s girl may be lovely, but Robert Redford’s co-star on “The Way We Were” allegedly wasn’t, according to the actor.

In an oral history of the iconic 1973 romance “The Way We Were,” director Sydney Pollack recalled Redford voicing his concerns over working with Barbra Streisand due to her perceived “controlling” reputation on set.

“She has never been tested,” Redford told Pollack, according to Robert Hofler’s “The Way They Were: How Epic Battles and Bruised Egos Brought a Classic Hollywood Love Story to the Screen,” on sale January 24, 2023. “Her reputation is as a very controlling person. She will direct herself. It’ll never work.” While director Sydney Pollack died in 2008, author Hofler compiled years of past interviews for the book.

Redford was particularly concerned with the “Funny Girl” Oscar winner’s musical background, saying, “She’s not going to sing, is she? I [don’t] want her to sing
See full article at Indiewire »

New Trailer for 4K Restoration of Walter Hill's 70s Classic 'The Driver'

New Trailer for 4K Restoration of Walter Hill's 70s Classic 'The Driver'
"Did you ever get caught on one of your jobs?" Studiocanal UK has revealed a brand new trailer for the 4K restoration and re-release of the 1970s neo-noir action thriller cult classic called The Driver. Before Refn's Drive and Wright's Baby Driver, there was The Driver. It originally premiered in the summer of 1978, and is now getting an upgrade for its 44th anniversary. The film stars Ryan O'Neal (Love Story), Bruce Dern (Nebraska) and Isabelle Adjani (Possession). O'Neal plays a getaway driver whose exceptional talent has prevented him being caught, Dern plays the relentless detective who sets out to trap him and Adjani plays the mysterious gambler who goes along for the thrill of the game. The 35mm Original Color Negative of The Driver was scanned at 4K resolution at Colorworks, who completed the 4K restoration including theatrical grade under Walter Hill's supervision. Studiocanal worked on the Uhd mastering,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Ethan Hawke

Ethan Hawke
Actor/writer/director Ethan Hawke discusses a few of his favorite films with Josh Olson and Joe Dante.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

Explorers (1985) – Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review

The Verdict (1982)

The Color Of Money (1986) – Rod Lurie’s trailer commentary

Nobody’s Fool (1994)

Three Faces Of Eve (1957)

Mr. And Mrs. Bridge (1990)

North By Northwest (1959)

Torn Curtain (1966)

Psycho (1960) – John Landis’s trailer commentary

Frenzy (1972) – Joe Dante’s trailer commentary

Topaz (1969)

Boyhood (2014)

An Officer and a Gentleman (1982)

Blue Collar (1978) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary

First Reformed (2017) – Glenn Erickson’s trailer commentary

Taxi Driver (1976) – Rod Lurie’s trailer commentary

The Left Handed Gun (1958)

Hombre (1967)

Hud (1963)

Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969)

The Life And Times Of Judge Roy Bean (1972) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary, Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review

Buffalo Bill And The Indians, Or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson (1976) – Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review

The Outrage (1964)

Rashomon (1950) – Brian Trenchard-Smith’s trailer commentary,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Farrah Fawcett Foundation Announces Star-Studded Tex-Mex Fiesta Benefit

Farrah Fawcett Foundation Announces Star-Studded Tex-Mex Fiesta Benefit
The Farrah Fawcett Foundation (Fff) recently announced that this year’s 4th biennial Tex-Mex Fiesta benefit will be held in Dallas at The Rustic on October 20, 2022, benefitting the American Cancer Society and Stand Up To Cancer.

President and CEO of the Fff and Farrah Fawcett's long-time friend, Alana Stewart, will be co-hosting along with Farrah’s former Charlie’s Angels co-star, Jaclyn Smith. Honorees include Linda Gray (of TV’s Dallas) and a special acknowledgment to Ryan O’Neal for his continued support of the Fff. Alana’s former husband and dear friend, George Hamilton, will be emceeing. Most recently announced is that Sheryl Crow will be the headliner for this year’s Dallas benefit!

Sheryl Crow is a nine-time Grammy Award recipient (out of 32 nominations) and an American music icon. Her first nine studio albums have sold 35 million copies worldwide; seven charted in the Top 10, and five were certified for Multi-Platinum sales.
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Leon Vitali Dies: Stanley Kubrick Close Associate And Actor Was 74

Leon Vitali Dies: Stanley Kubrick Close Associate And Actor Was 74
Leon Vitali, an actor in Barry Lyndon who went on to become director Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man, died Friday in Los Angeles at age 74. His family confirmed his death to Associated Press, but no cause was given.

Leon was a special and lovely man driven by his curiosity, who spread love and warmth wherever he went,” his children said in a statement provided by his daughter, Masha Vitali. “He will be remembered with love and be hugely missed by the many people he touched.”

Vitali was profiled in the 2017 documentary Filmworker, which spotlighted his contributions to Kubrick’ work. Filmmaker Tony Zierra’s noted that Vitali did everything from casting and coaching actors to overseeing restorations.

His duties went so far as to once setting up a video monitor so that Kubrick could keep an eye on his dying cat.

Matthew Modine, who starred in Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket,
See full article at Deadline »

Leon Vitali, ‘Barry Lyndon’ Actor and Personal Assistant to Stanley Kubrick, Dies at 74

Leon Vitali, ‘Barry Lyndon’ Actor and Personal Assistant to Stanley Kubrick, Dies at 74
Leon Vitali, an English actor who most notably played Lord Bullingdon in “Barry Lyndon” before becoming director Stanley Kubrick’s personal assistant, died Saturday. He was 74 years old.

Vitali’s death was confirmed by the official social media presence for Kubrick. No further details regarding Vitali’s death are available at this time.

“It is with the greatest of sadness that we have to tell you that the mainstay of a vast number of Kubrick’s films, Leon Vitali, passed away peacefully last night,” the account wrote in a statement. “Our thoughts are with his family.”

It is with the greatest of sadness that we have to tell you that the mainstay of a vast number of Kubrick's films, Leon Vitali, passed away peacefully last night. Our thoughts are with his family and all that new and loved him.

26 July 1948 – 20 August 2022 pic.twitter.com/uE0Q1KvQi1

— Stanley Kubrick (@StanleyKubrick) August 21, 2022

As a screen actor,
See full article at Variety »

Mailbag

Mailbag
Josh Olson and Joe Dante answer fan questions and comments.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

Abbott And Costello Meet The Mummy (1955) – Joe Dante’s trailer commentary

Monster A-Go-Go (1965)

Infested (2002)

Straw Dogs (1971) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary, Rod Lurie’s trailer commentary, Charlie Largent’s Criterion Blu-ray review, Joe Dante’s review

Straw Dogs (2011)

Mississippi Burning (1988)

The Ghost And Mrs. Muir (1947) – Axelle Carolyn’s trailer commentary

Grosse Pointe Blank (1997)

Bad Boy Bubby (1993) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary

The Mummy (1932) – Joe Dante’s trailer commentary, Charlie Largent’s Blu-ray review

The Mummy (1999)

The Howling (1981) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary, Randy Fuller’s wine pairings

Slappy And The Stinkers (1998)

Casper (1995)

Invisible Man (2020)

The Invisible Man (1933) – Charlie Largent’s Blu-ray review

Robot Monster (1953) – Joe Dante’s trailer commentary

The Stewardesses (1969)

The Hole (2012) – Joe Dante’s US, Italian, British trailer commentaries, Dennis Cozzalio’s review

Love (2015)

Cave Of Forgotten Dreams (2010)

McCabe And Mrs.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Fourth of July Review: Louis C.K.’s Return Bears Little Humor or Passion

Fourth of July Review: Louis C.K.’s Return Bears Little Humor or Passion
Why don’t we address the elephant in the room? Fourth of July is of course the surprise new film from Louis C.K., which as pitted against the decadence of previous directorial effort I Love You, Daddy—recognizable stars, black-and-white cinematography, taboo subject matter—made at the height of his influence, becomes a very curious object. But still not fun to watch. Comprising no-name actors, virtually zero production value, and an extremely small-scale story that would bore most despite any relatable themes, this can be surmised as either the work of a man on the ropes or one who really doesn’t care much anymore.

Our sympathetic protagonist being Jeff (Joe List), a New York jazz pianist who’s also a recovering alcoholic. In presumably his late 30s or early 40s, he’s hitting the point where he should probably decide what form of adulthood will define the rest of his life.
See full article at The Film Stage »
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