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Night Gallery: Something in the Woodwork (1973)
Season 3, Episode 11
7/10
Be careful what you ask for
16 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Bitter alcoholic Molly Wheatland (robustly played with lip-smacking glee by Geraldine Page) conjures the spirit of ghost Jamie Dillman (a solid performance by John McMurty) who resides in the woodwork of her attic to take care of her ex-husband Charlie (a fine and likeable portrayal by Leif Erickson).

Director Edward M. Abroms relates the enjoyable story at a constant pace, ably crafts a pleasing spooky mood, and makes nice use of the cobwebby attic setting. Moreover, Page has a field day with her colorful and unpleasant character. Rod Serling's clever script offers a nifty twist by presenting a ghost that just wants to be left alone and doesn't want to be bothered by anyone, which naturally results in a fitting nasty comeuppance for Molly at the end.
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8/10
Nice nterview
15 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Star and co-producer Edward James Olmos talks at length about the making and distribution of the indie Western "The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez" in this engrossing and informative 28-minute interview. Olmos points about that the movie was the first to feature an American hero of Latin descent and proudly notes that it is widely considered the most authentic Western in cinema history. Olmos further discusses why he hand picked Robert M. Young to direct the picture and reveals that the courthouse used in the movie was the actual courthouse that the trial for Gregorio Cortez was held in as well as that a real judge appears as the judge in said trial sequence. Olmos also goes in detail about how the wide national theatrical release for the film was sabotaged by a man who didn't like the movie. Worth a watch for fans of the film.
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Coma (1978)
8/10
An excellent medical thriller
15 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Spunky and determined Dr. Susan Wheeler (a terrific performance by Genevieve Bujold) suspects that something is amiss at the hospital she works at after a large volume of healthy patients develop complications while undergoing routine operations that cause them to slip into comas.

Writer/director Michael Crichton relates the gripping story at a constant pace, expertly crafts a considerable amount of nerve-wracking suspense that develops in a gradual, yet steady manner, and wisely puts a pronounced enhance on the story and characters over any fancy gimmicks or loud fireworks. Moreover, Crichton grounds the premise in a thoroughly believable workaday reality which in turn gives this movie an extra chilling edge.

Bujold simply shines as a highly sympathetic and courageous protagonist who's super easy to root for and care about. Michael Douglas also does well as Susan's skeptical boyfriend Dr. Mark Bellows who initially seems like kind of a jerk. In addition, there are sound contributions from Richard Widmark as tough, but fair administrator Dr. Harris, Elizabeth Ashley as the sinister Mrs. Emerson, Rip Torn as the stern Dr. George, and Lance LeGault as creepy assassin Vince. Lois Chiles and Tom Selleck have small roles as ill-fated patients while Ed Harris makes his film debut as a pathologist. Kudos are also min order for Victor J. Kemper's slick cinematography and Jerry Goldsmith's chilling score. An on the money nail biter.
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8/10
Nifty vehicle for Erica Boyer
14 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Prim'n'proper college student Mary Ann Rogers (foxy brunette Shanna McCullough) and her more adventurous tomboy gal pal Erica Thompson (the equally fetching Erica Boyer) shed their inhibitions and embark on a series of wild carnal misadventures while researching a term paper.

Director Bob Vosse keeps the eventful narrative moving along at a brisk pace as well as maintains an amiably breezy tone throughout. The sex scenes are pretty hot and explicit. Moreover, Boyer really gets a chance to strut her sizzling stuff: She busts some sexy dance moves, does a scorching BDSM dominatrix number with the delectable Jacqueline Lorians set to Wall of Voodoo's great cover of "Ring of Fire," and even pretends to be a gay man (complete with mustache!). In addition, we also get welcome appearances by such familiar hardcore cinema faces as Jon Martin as a guy who deflowers Mary Ann in an airplane bathroom, Paul Thomas as bisexual tennis player Rick, and Herschel Savage as hunky surfer dude Fred. Charles Gray's sunny cinematography gives this picture an attractive bright look. The funky-throbbing score hits the get-down groovy spot. Recommended viewing for Boyer fans.
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9/10
A magical and marvelous fantasy adventure with heart and a point
14 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Shy and awkward young boy Bastian (a fine and likeable performance b Barret Oliver) finds himself deeply engrossed in a book about brave teenage warrior Atreyu (an excellent portrayal by Noah Hathaway), who must save the Childlike Empress (Tami Stronach, who's enchanting, but never cutesy) and the glorious land of Fantasia from being destroyed by the evil Nothing.

Director/co-writer Wolfgang Petersen brings a sense of awe, wonder, and tremendous sweeping creativity to the captivating plot along with a more dark and daring sensibility that prevents the premise from becoming too silly or sappy. The world of Fantasia is beautifully well realized: The special effects hold up extremely well, with the assorted animatronic creatures registering as remarkably lifelike and convincing. Said colorful creatures include friendly luck dragon Falkor, gentle giant Rock Biter, scary wolf G'mork, and apathetic turtle Morla.

Gerald McRaney contributes a solid turn as Bastian's preoccupied father while Sydney Bromley and Patricia Hayes provide amusing comic relief as a couple of bickering gnomes. Jost Vacano's sumptuous widescreen cinematography provides a wealth of striking visuals. The ethereal synth score by Klaus Doldinger and Giorgio Moroder does the tuneful trick. Best of all, this film even makes a sweet and touching point about the importance of never losing one's capacity for hope and ability to make dreams come true with the sheer power of pure imagination. A total treat.
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Night Gallery: She'll Be Company for You (1972)
Season 3, Episode 10
7/10
Pretty good, but kind of muddled
13 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Henry Auden (a fine and credible performance by Leonard Nimoy) looks forward to being single again in the wake of his invalid wife's death. His wife's friend Barbara Morgan (well played by Lorraine Gary) gives Henry an orange tabby to keep him company, but the cat proves to be more of a burden than a relief.

Director Gerald Perry Finnerman relates the absorbing story at a steady pace as well as adroitly crafts an eerie and unsettling mood. Kathyrn Hays lends sturdy support as Henry's bitter secretary and paramour June. Both Lloyd Ahern's fluid cinematography and Eddie Sauter's shivery score are up to par. However, although David Rayfiel's script makes a valid point on how guilt and loneliness can drive someone insane, the overall rather disjointed plot never really coheres into a pleasing whole and ends on a dissatisfying abrupt note. This episode serves as a sound example of something with a strong build-up that fails to pay off effectively at the conclusion.
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8/10
Very unusual and atmospheric 70's hardcore outing
12 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Troubled middle-aged spinster Aggie (a fine and affecting performance by Deborah Ashira) lives in isolation with her disabled wheelchair-bound companion Richard (a solid portrayal by Patrick L. Farrelly). While attempting to remember the exact circumstances pertaining to how she and Richard first met, Aggie slowly, but surely pieces together a true portrait of who and what she really is.

Director Gerard Damiano relates the absorbing sad story at a deliberate pace, ably crafts a haunting melancholy mood, and maintains a grim brooding tone throughout. Kim Pope, Mary Stuart, and Darby Lloyd Rains are all excellent as various wildly contrasting incarnations of Aggie. Eric Edwards and Harry Reems are likewise very good as younger versions of Richard. Ron Wertheim's dark and daring script gradually peels away the layers of Aggie's disturbed psyche before culminating in a startling surprise downbeat ending as well as says something poignant and significant about the basic human need for companionship. The handsome cinematography by Joao Fernandes and the moody score by Rupert Holmes both further enhance the overall sound quality of this odd, yet highly effective and admirable 70's Golden Age winner.
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Night Gallery: Finnegan's Flight (1972)
Season 3, Episode 9
6/10
Middling episode
9 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Prison inmate Peter Tuttle (an excellent portrayal by Cameron Mitchell) uses his talent for hypnosis to enable dejected lifer Charlie Finnegan (a fine and affecting performance by Burgess Meredith) to "escape" from the federal penitentiary that they are both incarcerated in.

Director Gene R. Kearney relates the engrossing story at a steady pace and astutely captures the stifling nature of being perpetually confined. Mitchell and Meredith both do praiseworthy work in their roles, with sound support from Barry Sullivan as concerned psychiatrist Dr. Simsich and Kenneth Tobey as the hard-nosed warden. While Rod Serling's uneven script makes an interesting point about the power of the mind, it alas gets bogged down in sappy sentiment and reaches a pretty ridiculous explosive climax.
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8/10
Inspired hardcore spoof
8 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Mr. Blackman (a lively and amusing performance by Harry Dream) is the president of the hugely successful erotic cable TV channel WHAC. Blackman assembles his zany creative team together to brainstorm fresh ideas for new shows to be broadcast on his network.

Writer/director Howard Ziehm keeps the enjoyably racy story zipping along at a brisk pace, maintains an amiable tongue-in-cheek tone throughout, and milks lots of laughs from the blithely bawdy sense of humor. The send-ups up such popular TV programs as "M.A.S.H.," "General Hospital," and "As the World Turns" are every bit as hysterically raunchy as they ought to be. The sex scenes are pretty hot and explicit as well. In addition, this film further benefits from the sultry presences of a nice assortment of foxy babes who include the adorable Baby Sue Young, the always delectable Loni Sanders, the lovely Delia Cosner, lithe brunette Nicole Black, and yummy blonde Tina Jordan. A real hoot.
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Shampoo (1975)
9/10
At some point you gotta pay for playing around
8 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Feckless, but charming and handsome womanizing hairdresser George Roundy (a brave and commendable performance by Warren Beatty) tries to raise money to start his own business while simultaneously attempting to kept his increasingly busy and chaotic love life in order on the eve of the 1968 election.

Director Hal Ashby and writers Beatty and Robert Towne offer a biting, often wickedly funny, and ultimately poignant satire on the painful degeneration of 1960's idealism which culminated in the corrupt Richard Nixon winning the presidency and the Vietnam war raging into the next even more cynical decade, the moral erosion and social malaise wrought by the sexual revolution, how extreme narcissism makes people oblivious to the turmoil in the world around , and the harsh consequences beget by a life dedicated to pleasure and self-gratification. Ashby, Beatty, and Towne deserve extra praise for refusing to let callow and carefree stud George off at the end by having him pay a bitter emotional price for his aimless hedonistic ways. Better still, Ashby astutely captures a potent feeling of sadness bubbling under the happy plastic surface of affluent upper-crust Los Angeles.

Beatty brings a touching vulnerability and amiably perplexed cluelessness to George that prevents him from being a despicable libidinous jerk. The actresses who play the women in George's life are uniformly terrific: Julie Christie as worldly old flame Jackie, Goldie Hawn as the sweet Jill, Lee Grant as the needy, neglected, and neurotic Felicia, and, in her memorably brash film debut, Carrie Fisher as Felicia's snarky daughter Lorna. Jack Warden also excels as huffy, but humane rich bigwig Lester. Moreover, there are sound supporting turns by Tony Bill as shifty advertising executive Johnny Pope, George Furth as uptight bank loan officer Mr. Pettis, and Jay Robinson as George's long-suffering boss Norman. The lush cinematography by Laszlo Kovacs gives this picture a nice warm glow. Excellent soundtrack of period appropriate oldies, too. A really on-target gem.
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Blood Harvest (1987)
8/10
Tiny Tim elevates this sleazy slasher
7 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Jill (a solid and appealing portrayal by the fetching Itonia Salchek) returns to her small country town only to receive a hostile reception from the unfriendly locals. Pretty soon anyone close to Jill winds up meeting a gruesome untimely end.

Director Bill Rebane relates the engrossingly twisted story at a steady pace, ably crafts a creepy and seedy rural atmosphere, and delivers a pleasing plenitude of grisly'n'grotty gore and some especially tasty gratuitous female nudity courtesy of the luscious Miss Salchek. Moreover, this film gets a huge boast of energy from the always welcome presence of legendary eccentric novelty singer Tiny Tim, who delivers a delightfully idiosyncratic performance as merry weirdo Marvelous Mervo: Sporting grotesque clown make-up and wearing baggy clothes, Tiny Tim keeps popping up at the most inopportune moments and even sings the ending credits song in his trademark warbly falsetto. Dean West has a ball as the smitten, but unhinged Gary while Frank Benson lends amusing support as the laid-back sheriff. Worth a watch for Tiny Tim alone.
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9/10
Superior Western based on an actual incident
7 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Simple Mexican farmer Gregorio Cortez (superbly played with touching gentleness by Edward James Olmos) becomes a wanted fugitive and goes on the lam after killing a lawman in self-defense over a tragic misunderstanding of language in 1901 Texas.

Director Robert M. Young, who also co-wrote the thoughtful script with Victor Villasenor, not only presents a flavorsome evocation of the early turn of the century period setting that has a wonderfully lived-in authenticity, but also offers a trenchant and provocative commentary on prejudice, miscommunication, how the media can turn an ordinary man into a larger-than-life folk hero, and the harsh ugly reality of "frontier justice" that acquires considerable resonance and poignancy from the stark and unsentimental manner in which it tells the compelling fact-based story.

Olmos brings a winning humanity and vulnerability to his resourceful and reluctant outlaw character. Moreover, there are spot-on supporting contributions from James Gammon as tough, but fair Sheriff Frank Fly, Bruce McGill as earnest reporter Blakely, Brion James as the no-nonsense Captain Rogers, Pepe Serna as Cortez's brother Romaldo, Barry Corbin as compassionate lawyer B.R. Abernathy, Jack Kehoe as slimy prosecutor Pierson, and William Sanderson as a lonesome cowboy who's desperate for companionship. Kudos are also in order for the lovely cinematography by Reynaldo Villalobos and the harmonic score by Olmos and W. Michael Lewis. An excellent and affecting film.
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Night Gallery: The Other Way Out (1972)
Season 3, Episode 8
8/10
Waiting for Sonny
6 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Executive Bradley Meredith (an excellent performance by Ross Martin) attempts to dodge responsibility for the murder of a go-go dancer. However, the gal's cunning and vindictive grandfather Old Man Doubleday (superbly played with quiet menace by Burl Ives) invites Meredith to his remote rundown farmhouse to exact his revenge.

Writer/director Gene R. Kearney relates the gripping story at a snappy pace, expertly crafts plenty of nerve-wracking tension, and makes the most out of the delapidated abode setting. This episode further benefits from sterling work from the two leads: Martin totally nails the nervous nature of his stressed out character while Ives brings a folksy charm to his colorful role that's genuinely unsettling. The grim ending packs a startling punch, with the ultimate reveal of Sonny's identity standing out as a particular dandy surprise.
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The Visitants (1986)
8/10
Nice little sci-fi spoof
5 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Teenager Eric (likeable Marcus Vaughter) steals a ray gun from his two oddball neighbors who turn out to be aliens in disguise.

Writer/director Rick Sloane keeps the enjoyably inane story zipping along at a snappy pace, maintains an amiable lighthearted tone throughout, and shows a genuine affection for cheesy sci-fi alien invasion flicks. Moreover, it's acted with aplomb by a game cast: Jordana Capra and Joel Hile are both perfectly deadpan as the strange extraterrestrial couple, Nicole Rio makes a charming impression as Eric's sweet girlfriend Ellen, William Dristas is a riot as the nerdy Sherwin, Jeffrey Culver does well as science teacher Levelland, and Cliff Corder and Joan Tinei are amusing as Eric's clueless parents. The chintzy (far from) special effects possess a certain loveably rinky-dink charm. A real hoot.
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7/10
Two enjoyable comic stories
2 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
"You Can Come Up Now, Mrs. Millikan" - Hopelessly inept inventor Henry Millikan (an amiable portrayal by Ozzie Nelson) creates a potion that can revive the dead that he decides to try out on his ditsy wife Helena (a disarmingly sweet Harriet Nelson). Director John Badham gives this segment a likeable lighthearted tone that turns dark for a while before ending on a funny upbeat note. The Nelsons display an engaging natural chemistry; they receive sound support from Roger Davis as concerned nephew George Beaumont and Michael Lerner as the irate Dr. Burgess.

"Smile, Please" - A photographer (lovely Lindsay Wagner) meets a vampire (smoothly played by Cesare Danova). Very slight and silly, but still fairly amusing.
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8/10
Londsay is a seriously troubled girl
1 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Sensitive and despondent college student Lindsay (a fine and affecting performance by Sandy Behre) finds herself consumed by grief and despair in the wake of losing both her parents in a brutal car accident. Lindsay eventually commits suicide only to return to life so she can exact a harsh revenge on everyone who wronged her.

Writer/director Henrique Cuoto grounds the absorbing premise in a plausibly drab workaday reality, astutely captures Lindsay's deep depression, maintains a somber tone throughout, and pulls out all the chilling stops in the violent last third. Moreover, Behre nails the gut-wrenching anguish and awkwardness of her painfully shy and withdrawn character, which in turn gives this picture considerable resonance and poignancy. In addition, there are sound supporting contributions from Ruby Larocca as spunky gal pal Katie, Josh Lively as the callous Danny, Jason Pollock as Lindsay's unsympathetic boss, George Hrab as a lecherous college professor, and Couto as Lindsay's long-suffering brother. Superior indie fright fare.
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8/10
A nest of vipers get their just nasty desserts
1 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Ailing miserly matriarch Delilah Charles (a deliciously wicked and formidable portrayal by Agnes Moorehead) lives on a large plantation estate. Her various greedy and back-stabbing siblings gather together to collect Delilah's sizeable inheritance only to get bumped off left and right by a mysterious axe-wielding killer.

Writer/director John Farris relates the absorbing and enjoyable story at a steady pace, adroitly crafts a brooding gloom-doom Southern gothic atmosphere, and presents a colorful array of seriously damaged and dysfunctional characters. Moreover, it's acted with aplomb by an able and enthusiastic cast: Will Geer as rascally lawyer Ray Jurroe, Michael Ansara as the slimy Morgan, Dennis Patrick as pathetic junkie Dr. Alonzo Charles, Anne Meacham as shrill alcoholic Grace, Robert Gentry as jerky hunk Richard, Patricia Carmichael as troubled housekeeper Luddy, Elizabeth Eis as fetching nurse Ellen, and Ruth Baker as the ditsy Buffy. The startling moments of graphic gore pack a vicious punch. A solid and satisfying little shocker.
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Demon's Brew (1973)
2/10
Cruddy hardcore horror comedy dud
31 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
A newlywed couple en route to their honeymoon are abducted by a creepy chauffeur (Thora Birch's dad Jack Birch) and whisked off to a castle owned by none other than legendary vampire Dracula (broadly overplayed by Marc Brock). Dracula uses the husband's sperm as a key ingredient in a special potion that keeps him young and virile forever and keeps the bride as a chained up sex slave.

Sound good? Well, it just ain't. In fact, this film qualifies as a total train wreck: We've got slapdash (mis)direction by Duncan Stewart, a meandering narrative, dopey attempts at humor, irritating characters (the cackling old hag witch is especially annoying), static cinematography, a plodding pace, bare bones sets, minimal make-up (Dracula only has greasepaint smeared on his face!), a wafer thin script, a plodding pace, and even a groan-inducing lame twist ending. The always welcome presence of toothsome buxom blonde bombshell Carol Connors rates as the sole bright spot in this otherwise seriously dim flick, but alas Connors is given precious little to do. A real clunker.
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The Incubus (1982)
8/10
Nasty little shocker
31 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
A vicious demonic monster rapes and murders various women in the heretofore sleepy small town of Galen. It's up to driven and determined doctor Sam Cordell (a sturdy and intense performance by John Cassavetes) and hard-nosed police chief Hank Walden (an excellent portrayal by John Ireland) to stop the ferocious beast.

Director John Hough relates the engrossingly twisted story at a constant pace, stages the savage attack set pieces with flair and skill, maintains a harsh take-no-prisoners tone throughout, and ably crafts a grim and unsettling gloom-doom atmosphere. George Franklin's compact script hints at some really foul and disturbing stuff -- the monster has a huge phallus and leaves massive quantities of sperm in its female victims -- and delivers a neat surprise twist at the conclusion.

The solid acting by the capable cast keeps this movie on track: Kerrie Keene as pesky and pushy reporter Laura Kincaid, Erin Noble as Cordell's sweet daughter Jenny, Duncan McIntosh as the tormented Tim Galen, Helen Hughes as Tim's protective grandmother Agatha, and Harvey Atkin as worried mayor Joe Prescott. Albert J. Dunk's fluid cinematography makes impressive use of a smoothly gliding camera. The spirited shivery score by Stanley Myers hits the stirring spot. Moreover, this movie has a perverse sexuality to it that's genuinely icky and upsetting. The startling downbeat ending packs a shattering punch. An on the money fright flick.
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8/10
Big match in hell
30 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Cocky newly crowned boxing champion Jim Figg (a fine and credible performance by Gary Lockwood) gets taken to a mysterious hotel where he's forced to fight longtime undefeated pugilist Roderick Blanco (well played with imposing resolve by Chuck Connors).

Director Jeannot Szwarc relates the absorbing story at a snappy pace and ably crafts an intriguing enigmatic atmosphere. The sound acting from the capable cast rates as another substantial asset: Joan Van Ark as Blanco's sultry spouse Sondra, Charles Davis as smooth servant Hayes, and Ji-Tu Cumbuka as the bitter Big Dan Anger. The high stakes match is quite long and grueling, with a bleak outcome for both participants and a grim central message on the brutal price one must pay to be number one. A worthy episode.
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Night Caller (1976)
8/10
Reach out and creep someone out
29 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Disturbed pervert loner Robert (a nicely slimy portrayal by David Book) gets his sick kicks making obscene phone calls and spies on his beautiful neighbor Carol (attractive slender brunette Monique Starr) while she's doing the deed with her husband (rugged hardcore movie stud Ken Scudder). Robert's obsession with Carol causes him to go dangerously around the bend.

Director Anthony Spinelli relates the engrossingly sordid story at a steady pace and presents a strong sleazy atmosphere. The raunchy sex scenes are pretty explicit and arousing. The seamy script by Dean Rogers hits all the pleasingly warped bases which include childhood sexual trauma (yep, both Robert's mother and sister caught him peeping on them), a transvestite phone sex worker, some paint-peeling profanity (Robert's dirty phone calls are simply hysterical in their lewd content), and Robert masturbating while watching others engage in copulation. Kenneth Johnson's plain cinematography and Richard Silsby's moody electronic score further enhance the overall scuzzy tone. Recommended viewing for fans of depraved 70's adult cinema.
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Night Gallery: Spectre in Tap-Shoes (1972)
Season 3, Episode 5
7/10
Pretty solid episode
26 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Millicent (a fine and appealing performance by Sandra Dee) sinks into a deep depression and finds herself being haunted by the ghost of her twin sister Marian in the wake of Marian's shocking suicide by hanging.

Director Jeannot Szwarc relates the engrossing story at a steady pace and ably crafts an appropriately spooky'n'gloomy mood. Dee's touching portrayal of a distraught woman adds a substantial amount of emotional weight; she receives sound support from Christopher Connelly as concerned boyfriend Sam Davis, Dane Clark as sympathetic land developer William Jason, and Russell Thorson as the pragmatic Dr. Coolidge. Gene R. Kearney's clever script pulls off one particularly inspired twist, but alas attempts one surprise too many at the very end.
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8/10
Nifty little doc
25 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
This 42-minute retrospective documentary covers a lot of interesting and informative ground on the making of the assorted monsters featured in "Nightbreed." Make-up artist Bob Keen admits that the film should have been called "Cabal" and honestly expresses his extreme disappointment with how Warner Brothers marketed the movie as a slasher flick instead of as a monster movie. Paul Jones shares some fun stories about creating the berserkers who Clive Barker saw as mindless pro football players. Moreover, we also learn that Barker did sketches of all the monsters and even wrote social histories for all of them, the make-up for Lylesburg took three hours to apply, and various make-up guys were deputized to portray background monsters in the movie. Worth a watch for fans of the film.
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Don't Breathe (2016)
8/10
Looks like these thieves picked the wrong blind guy to mess with
24 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
A trio of thieves decide to break to break into the home of a blind man (superbly played with fierce intensity by Stephen Lang) who turns out to be very resourceful and hence quite dangerous.

Director Fred Alvarez, who also co-wrote the tight script with Rodo Sayagues, relates the gripping story at a brisk pace, adroitly crafts plenty of nerve-wracking claustrophobic tension, and throws in a few dandy sick twists. Moreover, Alvarez brings an intriguing moral ambiguity to the picture by making the blind man someone who's anything but a harmless innocent cripple. Jane Levy as the desperate Rocky, Dylan Minnette as the antsy Alex, and Daniel Zovatto as the cocky Money all do commendable work in their roles, but this film clearly belongs to Lang's impressively ferocious and frightening portrayal of a sightless war veteran loner who's quite a nasty and scary piece of work. Pedro Luque's sharp and fluid cinematography provides a pleasing glossy sheen. The spirited shivery score by Roque Banos hits the rattling spot. An on the money nail biter.
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8/10
Excellent retrospective documentary
24 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
This 72-minute retrospective documentary covers a lot of interesting and illuminating ground on the making of Clive Barker's horror/fantasy monsterfest "Nightbreed."Doug Bradley and Hugh Ross both discuss how they first met Barker while in acting in stage plays for him. Anne Bobby shares a touching anecdote about how the scene in which she saves Babette's life inspired her to become involved in animal rescue. Simon Bamford relates a funny story in which he reveals that his cute little dog companion didn't really care for him and hence was difficult to work with. Craig Sheffer reveals that the Cabal make-up took six hours to apply. Christine McCorkindale talks about taking aerobics classes for her role as Shuna Sassi and that the full body make-up took six to seven hours to apply. Moreover, we also learn that the set for Midian was built at the legendary Pinewood studios, Warner Brothers misleadingly marketed the movie as a slasher flick, Bradley's voice was dubbed by another actor in the theatrical version, and Ross was brought back for reshoots so his character Narcisse would survive in the theatrical version (he gets killed in the director's cut). Recommended viewing for fans of the film.
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