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Stoker (2013)
Mia is so absorbing without uttering any words that the screamers were bound to mourn alone in the corner.
21 October 2019
Stoker

The director Chan-wook Park's family drama looks like Hamlet-esque but behaves oddly nothing like it. So all the thinking gets out of the window. And I mean thinking as in the morally questioning situation that the characters find themselves in. For instance, Hamlet stays true to the gruesome practicality by never giving you what you want. Which is, the character doesn't get what they want. And they want evidence. Desperately. Both the sides of the parties. Which then leads them into assumptions, theories, thought provoking plans and misery at the end of the unexpected result and the shocking citations. So you get emotional response at both the times, the celebration of the uncertainty and the insanity of the fact.

Stoker on the other hand doesn't give its character or us the room to ever express what's going on. That is not what it feeds on. It feeds on what is right in front of it. You have the crime, the murderer and not even a suspect, and the dead cold body. What it then does is take actions. Romanticizes the idea of the relationships driving this film, but not towards what's in front of it. The history is to be accounted to move forward.

And here we find these characters in loop. On that note it is depressing to see the hauntingly beautiful gothic display ruined to bits. Stoker asks a lot from the performance and the cast delivers. That is the only aspect of the film that delivers. Not even those remarkable scenarios like sharing a tune or cutting each other through a glance. The performance is responsible for this slow seduction. So I suppose it remains to be a personal touch. What you fall for and what not. No guilts. No regrets. No reaction. Just action.
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The Lighthouse (I) (2019)
The long non-blinking unflinching enactment of the monologues warps you back to the theatre and you are in one.
20 October 2019
The Lighthouse

Eggers offers a sense of vulnerability. That is his gift. Now let's look at the premise itself. No matter how beautifully and brilliantly will it be wrapped. It certainly would leave you depressed at the end of the day. Yet, I am happy with the final result. Of course, not talking about the themes and the plot and the genre it explores. But the filmmaking. The co-writer and director Robert Eggers's subjective method is enchanting. You are lured into the procedure. The writing. Often Shakespeare and often Dickens is seen or heard or subtexted. There is a morality clause threatening the wrong doers in the film that is impeccably heartbreaking. And I say heartbreaking, for it is not exactly denying any boundaries.

And if, forgetting all the conditional circumstances that these duo is surrounded with, it is and they could be pushed over the immoral section. The script is written in the opposite direction. In the sense that it motivates you to root for them to get on the wrong track. This is wrong and core of this art form. Now, you as an audience are struggling. The claustrophobic, the lunatic experience feels like a justice. You are told to ask for those moments.

And earns those moments are our characters. The master and the slave. The prolific and the dead. Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson shares, or more honestly snatches, this characteristic from real life, as mentioned, from their career as well as in the character. And for this almost perfect casting which should and does boost the plot, there is a sound and clear "thank you" echoed in your emotion as they dance extravagantly in the terrifying black and white shades. The Lighthouse is a collection of various artists collaborating for something purely evil. The "pure" part I like, I envy.
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The Laundromat (I) (2019)
A heist? More like robbing you in front of your eyes. And by you, I mean you. Reading this.
20 October 2019
The Laundromat

The director Steven Soderberg is famous for sugar coating a bitter script into a magical bean. That's sort of his resume. He directs. And just as some famous directors (only directors) he relies, obviously, a lot on the writer. Unfortunately, tonight's not the night for Soderberg. That is not an excuse or defend for the director. I am not lawyer-ing for him, since he chose to work on the script with a big star in his pockets. I am defending him for I am with him, completely on his work. Usually while reading a script, something clicks and you see those words in a certain way. Hopefully, no one has ever seen.

Now you want to put your personal spin on that storyline and characters that will hook the audience lickety split. And if I was in his seat, I would too struggle a lot to hone this based-on-real-events crisis. But then maybe that's why he is Soderberg and I am.. Anyhoo, this brings back to where we started. The film doesn't stay true to anything. It never reaches the "Oh! This is that kind of a film" moment. And when it does and it does, late, right before the last act. It is clearly too late.

Despite well edited so called "small talks" and hilarious scenarios, the film doesn't capture the humor as it needed to. It is referred to, as being a wannabe Adam McKay's The Big Short, but it actually isn't. McKay's bibliography might as well be thrown out since it's not going to be useful for anyone but him. His unique touch is not Midas but a McKay's touch. The gold that Soderberg digs here had a wrong map, motivation and might I dare, even the hosts. And I mean, every actor present in The Laundromat.
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Jojo Rabbit (2019)
It is a film about disastrous historical events pulling us to the future, it is not some sci-fi adventure but a prediction of the could-have-been future.
19 October 2019
Jojo Rabbit

The co-writer and director Taika Waititi's shock and awe theory is shocking and awe-inducing. Amidst all the controversies and debates that the film has been provoking, you know then and there that the film works. Filmmaking is one slippery sand in your hand. You are told to define the filmmaking in the most textbook format. The definition asks for you to follow certain rules along with elements, proper stages with enough room and objectives that are obligatory. And this is how it is measured. Now, one would always argue then, why doesn't everyone gets it right. Well, one's an idiot. Because there is no textbook out there. So what you are referring to, what your source is, is your instinct.

You must have a sophisticated skillful way of turning the heads of the viewers. Tilting with wonder? Why not. And you can deny and argue as much as you like but Taika in its absurdity and contradictory method, wins your heart with a charming and delightful "small talks". If it makes you cry, it made you feel something. If you're laughing, then you are. The "experience" factor of the film could not be more clear.

Taika's Jojo Rabbit is rabbit-alike. My family has just adopted a rabbit. So all I see is it. But the adorable looks or tone of the film overcomes its undermining and often questioning themes. The film repeatedly skips the "homework" aspect of the narration to zap you with an emotional dose. There are so many things wrong with it. But then, the premise itself asks for it. And no, I am not pointing towards the old Hitler routine, the elephant in the room. But what goes behind those frames. There are some unearthly images enacted in the film to exaggerate the underlined lunacy where all these acts were leading towards.
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Modern Times (1936)
You can go ahead and paste his name at the top of the list. The list of the best filmmaker never needed any update.
19 October 2019
Modern Times

Charlie Chaplin is in his prime stage now. Now as in then when the film came out. And prime stage as in both, his narrative skills and performance. Today we're not going to boast about the social and political satire and other changes that the film deals with. But the body language that takes place in this film. The importance of this universal language is something we all know and understand. And here it spews wonder like some winning rap in a rap battle does. And I don't mean the obvious visual galore that is captured by camera tricks to serve the humor and wow factor. But I am talking about just Charlie's control over his body.

He is insanely in command of his body. There is not a fumble, not a trip, not a wave that is accidental. Even when he is.. nay, especially when he is out of control, he is still dancing the dance of his life. And I say that for the images that he could not be in charge of. As in, he doesn't just do his stunts or whatever you may like to call it, only once but does it frequently, does it fast, does it smooth.

Except for that dive in the shallow water, he is giving meticulous set pieces that are emotionally motivated, continuously. Now, coming back to the theme of Modern Times. I don't want to use the term ahead of its time, but it is. And its maturity and philosophy is why it remains to be one of my favourite Charlie Chaplin adventures. The love story looks like an excuse, just as it should be. The sacrificial act isn't actually sacrificial. To me, it was a proposal. A proposal to be a friend. A good hard working friend.
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father and daughter..
19 October 2019
Young Sheldon

Young Sheldon; a spin-off of The Big Bang Theory, that was created for the fans of Sheldon Cooper is on the contrary, more disappointing for the viewers to watch, since their beloved character gets ripped off by dull writing. Its primary objective from the first episode wasn't set off to create a humorous environment which would have been suffice but as it started aging on screen the target started to blur out and is now shooting arrows in the dark confusing and disappointing the viewers from the offered thin material.

Ian Hermitage at the centre of it is adorable- that's as far as it gets- for this tone of the series. The relationship between MeeMaw and Sheldon is the most disappointing aspect considering the gravitas it consists at the back of our and the protagonist's head. The narrative often attempts to weave out a morale out of daily conflicts that usually goes around in one's house, but at the compromise of the integrity and the quality of the product, it surely isn't adequate enough to sit through.

Focusing on the socialization has always worked in a bit mature sense. Addition to that, just to spice it up, the younger characters meddling or more precisely, rebelling with the adults works like a charm and gives a flattering and familiar track especially from Sheldon's perspective. The sibling relationship is properly constructed if not executed. To be honest, it isn't even written sharply. The only thing it gets right is the cut throat humour that is used as a tool to level up on the scoreboard in a never ending show.

Hobbitses, Physicses And A Ball With Zip

Call it loud, cheesy, uncomfortable, familiar, manipulative or repetitive- don't call it this much, by the way. But you can't say that it doesn't work. You fall for it knowingly and happily. And if it balances both humor and drama, it is for it is stuffed in front of you as a sandwich. The germ of the idea emerges as a sappy attitude followed by a relatable and responsible scenario that ends on a normal or in this case a sappy attitude.
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City Lights (1931)
Day and night. Day and night. This is how the film travels making sure that both of them are present at once.
19 October 2019
City Lights

Charlie Chaplin's boxing match is not a serious match. I know that's obvious. But it is not. Not expected. At the back your thoughts, you are always waiting to get things serious. Gritty. Bloody. Brutal. Intense. And it is these films that makes us expect these things from a genre as such. Not even touching the Rocky milestone, I am just playing around Raging Bull by Martin Scorsese and Battling Butler by Michel Keaton- someone from Charlie's days itself. They've all tried to plaster the sincerity of that job on screen. You can joke around, fool around as much as you like but that sport is respected with a jarring punch when the time comes.

Not to say that Charlie doesn't respect it. His method of living up to that "dutiful" objective is somewhat different. Nay, not different. Mature. Ahead of time. He doesn't pay homage to those heavy lifters by putting them in the ring, but does it so elegantly in the dressing room. From hard work to the stakes that are played every night on the screen, everything is mocked or more accurately notified in Charlie's dictionary. There is a sense of pride in carrying that note.

And maybe that is why he has crafted such an empathetic and a low key character in the rest of the screen time. He is wreck but an adoptable one. Another thing that makes this film incredibly different than the others is the jokes. All the jokes are an elaborative comic sketches that takes energy along with time for it to work, from you. And then there is the end of the tunnel in the City Lights. A purely unconditional and innocent act that penetrates your emotion as that good old symbol of love arrow does. The birds fly and sing by merrily.
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The Visit (I) (2015)
Who'd have thought that the background score would be the actual hero. I love the entire look of it.
19 October 2019
The Visit

M. Night Shyamalan, the writer and director's film is a joy to behold. Filmed through a documentary lens, Shyamalan's to-the-point direction is actually beneficial this time. Some would and does argue to those plot points that grows loud and cheesy which weighs down the film to ever soar perpetually. And yes, there are those moments in the film that comes easily and repetitively. But what Shyamalan does so brilliantly is that he frames it as the part of a "cinematic experience". There is a film within the film that is every now and then mentioned to keep the viewers alive and confident.

And mind you there is no one as confident as Shyamalan on convincing you to be confident yourself. Just watch the last act of Glass enfolding before your eyes. Any other filmmaker would flinch on taking away the heat from their own script by basically showcasing the "awkwardness" of a film shoot in the film. Somehow he frames that as a narrative now whether it works or not that's a different day, but it definitely is a bold and confident choice.

Now coming back to those textbook set pieces. There isn't actual ever a note that gives away the fact that he isn't aware of his viewers' expectations. He knows you are in a Shyamalan world. He built it. The reputation and the films. Hence, he frames it as an expected destination. You know that they are going to wait for the arrival of that know station. The Visit is that visit for me. And you know what, you know a film is working when you are so immersed in whatever images shown in front of us, that you forget where you're headed. And on that note it is also a wrong knock on the door.
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The accepted incompetency and the limitations and (then) the darings of these men, is familiar and hilarious.
18 October 2019
Hannah And Her Sisters

Allen's speech is an impeccable weapon. He is the destroyer of a self-created genre. The writer and director Woody Allen, don't forget, is also the creator. This God like person that he carries off himself, in the entire runtime of his films; which is mostly short and crisply edited, is something everyone would envy. And it is the commanding signature vocab of his, that he spreads, injects in each and every character. Now this is sort of insanely risky. You are, as a rule, told to give each character a different voice. And here we are decades and one of the most successful careers of all time later. Allen's gift of witty humor is not a joke.

He balances the drama and humor like a champ. And this is something that previously and even now, so many have tried to achieve, but only few can get the reactions as anticipated. So how does he do that? And why can't anyone else cross that bridge as effortlessly and frequently as he does? Well, it is simple. At the back of his head, he is always aware of the theme that underlines the entire scenario, the entire film.

And now all the jokes or elaborated sketches that are about to come will serve that purpose bits by bits. And this gradual procedure goes unnoticed for you are busy having the time of your life. You can see the grin on his face, when he jam-packs this much content in that aforementioned runtime. The result is a fast paced narration that looks like a hack job and instead is a fully functioning craftsmanship that can only be achieved by someone who is nominated for 24 Oscars. Hannah And Her Sisters might be about them, but just as any other Woody character or film, all I see his hypochondriac face.
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Falling Down (1993)
These characters holding their end of the bargain is not to be taken lightly, at least by us and that's a request.
18 October 2019
Falling Down

The director Joel Schumaker's commercial take on any material is magnanimous on looks and incompetent mentally or emotionally. Let me rephrase that. The term "commercial" shouldn't be used while describing Joel's films. It is in his blood. And could also be argued that he, himself is more of an audience than a maker. And hence his picks, his choices is something an audience can relate to and even agree to. They encourage it. It is entertained, the idea is entertained by the audience rather than the other way around. And Joel makes sure his film checks everyone and every fantasy of theirs.

But his films have always left me unchecked. I always find myself compromising with the result. And the result isn't something that appears in a blink. It comes after a series of choices. And there is nothing wrong with what sort of choices Joel chooses. He is a sophisticated director. He knows where he should aim at. The only issue is that he is aiming at those things lazily. And arguably it could also be said that not much homework went in in this production.

And for a thrilling drama I am ready to let that part go. But something so standard, something like a map should come in handy in a film as physical as such. We never are fully aware of the space between the characters and the world it revolves around. You can see that in the last scene of the film. What should have been the ultimate showdown, is now just an embarrassing moment shared by Michael Douglas playing an eccentric exhausted worker and Robert DuVall playing an emotionally wrecked "sheriff". You can see why Falling Down swoon its audience, it has the generic action goods you'd love to be around.
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Modern Family: Pool Party (2019)
Season 11, Episode 4
this is anarchy..
17 October 2019
Modern Family

Modern Family being critically acclaimed, loved by the fans and even buzzed on award shows in its earlier stages was due to the hard and fast humor that swiftly resulted into genuine emotions on the screen and the projection of some of the most complicated and delicate relationships like a father (Burrell) going the distance and pushing the boundaries for his son (Gould) which was shown in some mesmerizing semi-comic sequences.

But, as it started aging on screen the content grew thinner but still some of the cast's acting made it worth a while which unfortunately started to fade off too resulting into an exhausting experience and petty humor where the viewers are just waiting for the makers to attain the aspired closure. Being a prime victim of this disease has failed on delivering any loose end of a thread for the audience to hold on to for the forthcoming experience; the mundane household and work day issues that it used to thrive on, seems like a myth, now.

The performance is convincing by the cast like Sofia Vergara and Ed O'Neill whilst the show stealers are Ty Burrell and Julie Bowen but after a certain point, it's just depressing to watch them work so hard on so little. The nature to attain a full circle in an episode has always been its strength but lately this has been resulted into shallow and manipulative emotional drama where the line drawn is from an amateur writing skills that itches throughout the course.

Pool Party

With Dunphy family members in charge, there is surely no regrets in the episode. Even the usual meal that Bowen has with her daughters is charismatic. And only because it doesn't tries so hard to be funny and is just happy to just have a conversation, no matter what it is about.
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No investigation and no coroner's report, the clue is to be found at the funeral.
17 October 2019
Warning: Spoilers
American Woman

The director Jay Scott and the writer Brad Ingelsby's grim look on the fawlty socialized lifestyle of the wannabe popularity, is sad. It shouldn't be sad. The sadness is to be addressed. And poignancy is the part of the game. What it shouldn't have is sadness in the air. You should be moved emotionally with the life that Sienna Miller's character goes through. But it doesn't happen. Or it didn't happen with me. And the man who should be on stand is Brad's textbook script. The structure not only seems lazy but often immensely dull. These transitions that the film makes is also handled with a lofty subjective tricks by Scott.

One of the most difficult things I find to write is time lapse, narratively. You can easily get loud or inadvertently obnoxious in your language. And the film, whenever it jumps from one antic to another, loses the battle to hold up to its energy. And there is enough energy to make your head spin. In fact, one of my favorite scenes of the film is when these characters, the family comes together and shares a meal or an occasion. The practical environment spread throughout these scenes is simply spectacular.

You can see everyone equally involved or more accurately not involved in each others' lives. The time when the film starts losing control is when Aaron Paul arrives or is about to arrive. And no, even his performance couldn't save the wreck ball the film is then. Surprisingly his character is everything that we and Sienna Miller is looking for. But it is that very reason. It is that cheap shot of taking away from the viewers and giving it back to us, is what we shouldn't entertain. American Woman could have gone anywhere, instead of where it does, to play the bold game.
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After all the theories my head was bobbing with, I should have instead squeaked the toy.
17 October 2019
Nothing But The Truth

So Rod Lurie, the writer and director's film would be highly recommended in my house. The hints of courtroom drama that it delivers is not the only reason. But the existence of such an unsettling climax sketched after a promising premise. So what made this ending of the film frowned upon by others. First of all, one shouldn't look at a story as a call to your own history. Or your expectations. An ending has never made me reevaluate what I have thought of that film. Yes, I could be disappointed. But not in the ending. For usually that is what is in one's mind. You choose a destination and then you start learning how to drive. What would make me question is the road that leads to that station.

Why would a storyteller choose a road that would be bumpy and unsettling and even tiring at the end of the trip. Now what Lurie did isn't particularly wrong. Off track? Misleading? Sure. But you can always see in the film that Lurie is repeatedly failing on attempting any sense of sensibility out of that situation. And I don't mean that deliberate plot points that are placed to provoke your thoughts. But the theme it wishes to get out from those scenes.

There is no equality. No rhythm. None whatsoever similarity. You find yourself shifting, changing positions, perspectives to find a way out. But what it does do well and what Lurie should have stuck with, is that strong grip that these characters have on the audience. So instead of looking for a way out through a mature ending, he should have craft it into a commercial thriller. With juicy twists and turns, Nothing But The Truth could have been nothing but a sharp and satisfying case.
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Books and writers and scholarships. A paper read should be the big finale and you are going to get exactly what you expect.
17 October 2019
Finding Forrester

Gus Van Sant, the director, is my go to guy. I can understand why it won't be for everyone. For he deals with the drama that comes with or from a privileged position. That is not to say, of course, that his emotions juggled across the film is less important. But he certainly is aware of the selective audience that he might be able to draw a nod out from. Now, that is not only not an excuse but also not a recommended way to move forward. So how do you make people care about something in a larger margin? Like some controversial issue that is taking over the nation? World?

Sports, is his way in. And it should be it. There is always a quality of earning your spot or moving forward or winning an element in his films. This is what makes you earn that act of the film. This is how he makes you care for these characters. And Finding Forrester fits right in on this strategy of his. And you can see that in the very first act itself. The common and often accused issues is eliminated by Sean Connery with a commanding voice. This gets thrown out of the window.

The obvious part of the deal. So now we can roll up our sleeves and get right to the heart of the matter. A mature productive debate to solve a higher themed issue. This once again would thin out the heard that would sing along to this rhythm. But with a character driven emotionally resonant approach, Gus Van Sant whips you hard with long lasting tears. Almost, as if you are told to tear down. Not something that is rubbed on your face but gets an attention through an underrated performance. Connery and Abraham shares only one moment in the film. And that is enough.
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Desperado (1995)
The one-liners, I can see, would make the whole screen scream for Antonio Banderas, I know I would.
15 October 2019
Desperado

The director Robert Rodriguiz cannot get my attention enough. And I love it. The entire filmography of his tickles my brain. What? Why? And how? First of all, his commercialized version of a film is pretty close to the art form he wishes to speak. Now, this is my window in. I love these aspects of his films. The Tarantino alike- it is not a surprise since they have collaborated with each other plenty of time over the years- stories or call it a monologue that these guys share is the way to hook you in. So why not go through it. Now take Tarantino's films for instance. These stories, fables, tid bits is what we call the crisp, the entertainment part of the film.

Just as the violence, the action in the film is. What then Tarantino does with the rest of the time, is ground these parties, the enjoyment, the weekend of the film with is proper heavy and profound themes with a new take and perspective. Now, this is where Robert falls short. His film, if not rummaging around the jokes and the action, will simply color the film and the characters with incredibly filmy or more expressively lofty substances.

Not even substances but scenarios. These scenes that he wishes to project doesn't only feel forced but also questionable. The choices that these stereotypical one dimensional characters make, is something wrongly unfathomable. And to add more trouble Robert too isn't balancing the laws that he establishes. Take the last act of Desperado. One where our protagonist after a battle that he fought with a half-grin plastered across his face, now is told to draw out empathy as a character that he is emotionally connected is hospitalized. I still don't understand the existence of that last piece and certainly not the way it is projected.
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So much to do, so much to work on. Art is a game of sacrifice and there goes the head of that very personality.
15 October 2019
The White Crow

With only three and sincere films out, Ralph Fiennes should be on your list just as it is mine, if you wish to sober up with a film. He has explored various subjects, heavy subjects in these films. Something that is not usually advised or even dared. Yet, post three successful films- successful as in they're good- Fiennes remains barely high on his skills. And unfortunately that is not a compliment in here. Usually this is a good thing. But as a director you are required to be confident in your material, your characters, your film. And what is at loss here is the attention of the audience. You have to be in command of those two hours as soon as the lights shut down and the magic begins.

What is happening now, is that the audience finds itself promising for a truce to meet the storyline, the characters halfway there. That is not a commute I'd like to do. I say commute because I have been through that road a lot. So why and how does Ralph's film still manages to dance at the tip of its toe, the entire show? It is the debates. The arguments, productive and sometimes just thrilling debates, is what seduces you to do the right thing.

Or wrong thing. It is personally motivated and emotionally challenged. That is all that matters. Ralph has a spectacular way to move the audience. And for a dance themed film you would assume that it is the razzle dazzle show or the textbook training montages that will swoon you in. But remember the seduction in the film is always wrong and challenged. And so it is in the film The White Crow, not the hardworking nor the pay off, but the leisurous time that it spends more than it earns, is the logic Ralph pursues.
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Shadow (2018)
The choreography is not a commercial trick, the slow motion is not to splash around, it expresses ruthlessly.
14 October 2019
Shadow

Yimou Zhang, if not a filmmaker, should be a fashion designer. I don't know why I said fashion designer. Just designer would suffice. But I suppose it his elegance in the eye popping fabric; i.e the crux of the game, war to be precise, that stylizes the storytelling to its pinnacle. There is not a single element- technical element- that goes waste by. And I have to mention the visual spectacle that this film is. Almost sung by two colors in unison the set pieces, the clothes, the weapons and the sacrifices are only and could only be poisoned by the abhorrence that the color red is.

And it is not just the act that spills the screen with the color red. It is also the evil side of the sacrifice, balancing this honorable world of Zhang. The reasoning, more honestly, the betrayal isn't seduced nor is challenged in Zhang's film. And instead it is very much inherited. There is arrogance in the blood that has to come out. The bad boy nature of the film that rattles yours and theirs morality, is something to ponder about. And it is not a film that stays with you for those two hours.

Not only does the film keeps you at the edge of your toes with its thought provoking themes, but also leaves you halfway through, not situationally but ethically, to start rediscovering the map. That bit, right there. Is breathtaking. Not a lot of film gives you that satisfaction. Or doesn't give you that satisfaction. Until you're done with the last act, you will find it difficult to know where will this tale land. It keeps you guessing, mostly because the characters itself are. Not just the Shadow is guessing and hoping for a safe way out, but even its master is bound to.
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Life (I) (2017)
Ry-Ry and Jakey-Jakes reporting for duty. They shouldn't have.
14 October 2019
Life

Daniel Espinosa, the director has a pretty simple pop culture vocab. It ought to suck the viewers in and leave none the wiser. The simple beings will whirl merrily around the cheap thrills and the smarter ones exhausted and also mildly depressed by the "entertainment" clause that the film misinterprets. And what I was disappointed the most was from the fact that the film is incredibly effortful. And I don't mean just the practical shooting of the zero gravity scenes- which actually is all of them- and the poorly painted visual effects. But I am pointing towards the script. A script that tries so hard to not be "this" or "that" film, ends up being like no film at all. And I don't mean that in a good way.

From the casting decisions to horrifying elements, each of them or those are staged in a way to impress by disproving your theory or expectations. By the way, there is nothing wrong with that. But considering this as a meaningful advancement in the storytelling and relying upon it that the audience will feed on it, easily. There's everything wrong with that. Life becomes difficult to define. Not to forget that there isn't any profound poetry behind that.

But it neither remains a survival job nor a chess game. Not nearly a suicidal mission and certainly not an act of sacrifice. We are given a brief period, a brief set piece, a brief number of characters and horribly brief encounters of death or tragedy. So maybe the genre "horror" fits in perfectly. Not for the audience, but the makers and the film and the Life itself. P.S. It is really difficult to not break the fourth wall, knowing that these two geniuses- Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal- were goofballing around the set. Maybe they should have just shown us those footages.
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This should be documented and even considered to be TRUE, no one can make up an epilogue as good as such, it has to be real.
11 October 2019
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

So was there ever a doubt before going in on a Vince Gilligan project? Especially when and where he guides us into his Breaking Bad Universe. Not particularly. But I could not say even for a second that I was completely confident. It is not that I don't believe in his hard work and sincerity. It is just that Breaking Bad, similar to others, is near and dear to my heart. I am a bit sensitive on that subject. I was afraid more than I was speculative about this project. And it took a second act for Gilligan, although it should have taken only one, to convince me that this is a safe round. And I emphasize on that second act because I have never seen Gilligan so confident of his material.

That.. call it evolution or a calculated risk.. is what blows out every single fear of this epilogue. See, now the difference between the first and the second act is of course, Gilligan's change of perception of these characters. If the first act seems effortful- I only say effortful, for you can see him using all signature tactics of his like humor, playing with props, universal (physical) language tricks and witty solution to a simple problem, in order to keep the audience on their toes- the second is set free to change the tone as per wish.

This handover. This steering wheel that Gilligan so enticingly gifts to Aaron Paul is not only profoundly bold but also acceptable. It would make sense. It makes sense. Paul should take over that responsibility and choose. Ergo, there is this beautiful scene in the second act where Paul has to choose whether to kill someone or not. That entire scene. That entire act is pure performance. He shivers, he squeaks, he melts down and he chooses. Just as everyone chose to invest on making and experiencing El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie.
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thank her in person..
11 October 2019
Young Sheldon

Young Sheldon; a spin-off of The Big Bang Theory, that was created for the fans of Sheldon Cooper is on the contrary, more disappointing for the viewers to watch, since their beloved character gets ripped off by dull writing. Its primary objective from the first episode wasn't set off to create a humorous environment which would have been suffice but as it started aging on screen the target started to blur out and is now shooting arrows in the dark confusing and disappointing the viewers from the offered thin material.

Ian Hermitage at the centre of it is adorable- that's as far as it gets- for this tone of the series. The relationship between MeeMaw and Sheldon is the most disappointing aspect considering the gravitas it consists at the back of our and the protagonist's head. The narrative often attempts to weave out a morale out of daily conflicts that usually goes around in one's house, but at the compromise of the integrity and the quality of the product, it surely isn't adequate enough to sit through.

Focusing on the socialization has always worked in a bit mature sense. Addition to that, just to spice it up, the younger characters meddling or more precisely, rebelling with the adults works like a charm and gives a flattering and familiar track especially from Sheldon's perspective. The sibling relationship is properly constructed if not executed. To be honest, it isn't even written sharply. The only thing it gets right is the cut throat humour that is used as a tool to level up on the scoreboard in a never ending show.

An Entrepreneurialist And A Swat On The Bottom

This is a one dimensional fairy tale told with uneasy sweetness and cheap humor. But this cheap humor sells us the expected product surprisingly and convincingly. Just take those cut throat sarcastic comments ping ponged around in their house especially by the siblings. Also, there is this enactment of an old joke where Sheldon calls his teacher in a library. You cannot not fall for that joke.
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Modern Family: Perfect Pairs (2019)
Season 11, Episode 3
i wouldn't mind getting the exact figure on that..
11 October 2019
Modern Family

Modern Family being critically acclaimed, loved by the fans and even buzzed on award shows in its earlier stages was due to the hard and fast humor that swiftly resulted into genuine emotions on the screen and the projection of some of the most complicated and delicate relationships like a father (Burrell) going the distance and pushing the boundaries for his son (Gould) which was shown in some mesmerizing semi-comic sequences.

But, as it started aging on screen the content grew thinner but still some of the cast's acting made it worth a while which unfortunately started to fade off too resulting into an exhausting experience and petty humor where the viewers are just waiting for the makers to attain the aspired closure. Being a prime victim of this disease has failed on delivering any loose end of a thread for the audience to hold on to for the forthcoming experience; the mundane household and work day issues that it used to thrive on, seems like a myth, now.

The performance is convincing by the cast like Sofia Vergara and Ed O'Neill whilst the show stealers are Ty Burrell and Julie Bowen but after a certain point, it's just depressing to watch them work so hard on so little. The nature to attain a full circle in an episode has always been its strength but lately this has been resulted into shallow and manipulative emotional drama where the line drawn is from an amateur writing skills that itches throughout the course.

Perfect Pairs

There is this essence of originality in this episode. It makes you remember those old days and old seasons. That is not to say that it is as good as it was back then. But they did something that somehow makes sense. And I think it was their instinct of returning back to the roots that helped them satisfy the viewers this time. And it is that root, that base of the series where everything, every conflict can be solved by one element. Which as usual happens to be something that the other character is struggling through. This is how Modern Family defines the term teamwork and you have to score them good for this answer.
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Cheers: I Do, Adieu (1987)
Season 5, Episode 26
i've never been more alive..
11 October 2019
Cheers

Glen and Les Charles along with James Burrows created a sitcom that never completely created havoc as it should have. It still baffles me considering the reception it received in cultural world. That is not to say that it doesn't hold a valuable position. It is just that I would request it to be put up a few places higher. For there is this impeccable emotion passed on throughout this 11 years of journey that seems surreal to even have existed in the first place. And that simple one word note is sweetness. Almost too much. I am sorry but it is impossible for a series or anything to run nothing but on sweetness for 11 years. 11 YEARS.

And yet, against all odds it does and works. I think it is only because the crass humor that they fill their day time- and it has to and does feel like a day time- with is actually motivated with a flirty language. And no matter what age you are or what culture you come from or what taste do you possess. The grammar of a flirting language is always received with a smile. And that is all this series tries to do. Not a laugh, not a tear, it aims for a light hearted experience and it gets the order done. And it is an order done right in correct order.

And by this you can see why there is not a complete acceptance of this world in ours. Too much of something can be intangible. Even hostile to someone. But I think I would persist on looking its crafting of this self-created genre. If it is assumed to be difficult to watch than it is also difficult to form. Cheers has an environment that may not particularly be your cup of coffee or a glass of beer, but what it remains is a weekday delight and not a weekend wild party. The makers knew it, the cast too and it's time the viewers too.

I Do, Adieu

So even though there is a lot of cons to swallow in this episode. What it is wrapped around is with the finest element of the series and that is of course Diane and Sam sitting and having a conversation. A productive, not even particularly funny and a mature conversation. At the end of it, I am not disappointed.
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Cheers: A House Is Not a Home (1987)
Season 5, Episode 25
my eyes closed..
11 October 2019
Cheers

Glen and Les Charles along with James Burrows created a sitcom that never completely created havoc as it should have. It still baffles me considering the reception it received in cultural world. That is not to say that it doesn't hold a valuable position. It is just that I would request it to be put up a few places higher. For there is this impeccable emotion passed on throughout this 11 years of journey that seems surreal to even have existed in the first place. And that simple one word note is sweetness. Almost too much. I am sorry but it is impossible for a series or anything to run nothing but on sweetness for 11 years. 11 YEARS.

And yet, against all odds it does and works. I think it is only because the crass humor that they fill their day time- and it has to and does feel like a day time- with is actually motivated with a flirty language. And no matter what age you are or what culture you come from or what taste do you possess. The grammar of a flirting language is always received with a smile. And that is all this series tries to do. Not a laugh, not a tear, it aims for a light hearted experience and it gets the order done. And it is an order done right in correct order.

And by this you can see why there is not a complete acceptance of this world in ours. Too much of something can be intangible. Even hostile to someone. But I think I would persist on looking its crafting of this self-created genre. If it is assumed to be difficult to watch than it is also difficult to form. Cheers has an environment that may not particularly be your cup of coffee or a glass of beer, but what it remains is a weekday delight and not a weekend wild party. The makers knew it, the cast too and it's time the viewers too.

A House Is Not A Home

It is difficult as a viewer to go through this episode for we know that the makers has to and does steer to the elephant in the room that they have been dodging unsuccessfully over the years. You cannot help yourself from not going there which has always been annoying.
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Cheers: Cheers: The Motion Picture (1987)
Season 5, Episode 24
a missing link..
11 October 2019
Cheers

Glen and Les Charles along with James Burrows created a sitcom that never completely created havoc as it should have. It still baffles me considering the reception it received in cultural world. That is not to say that it doesn't hold a valuable position. It is just that I would request it to be put up a few places higher. For there is this impeccable emotion passed on throughout this 11 years of journey that seems surreal to even have existed in the first place. And that simple one word note is sweetness. Almost too much. I am sorry but it is impossible for a series or anything to run nothing but on sweetness for 11 years. 11 YEARS.

And yet, against all odds it does and works. I think it is only because the crass humor that they fill their day time- and it has to and does feel like a day time- with is actually motivated with a flirty language. And no matter what age you are or what culture you come from or what taste do you possess. The grammar of a flirting language is always received with a smile. And that is all this series tries to do. Not a laugh, not a tear, it aims for a light hearted experience and it gets the order done. And it is an order done right in correct order.

And by this you can see why there is not a complete acceptance of this world in ours. Too much of something can be intangible. Even hostile to someone. But I think I would persist on looking its crafting of this self-created genre. If it is assumed to be difficult to watch than it is also difficult to form. Cheers has an environment that may not particularly be your cup of coffee or a glass of beer, but what it remains is a weekday delight and not a weekend wild party. The makers knew it, the cast too and it's time the viewers too.

Cheers: The Motion Picture

Maybe this was their way out. To break the fourth wall and turn the series a bit meta. Yet not going in an obvious or maybe reliable way, their attempt of genuinely creating a film does a last a longer if not formidable impact on its viewers and the characters.
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Cheers: Norm's First Hurrah (1987)
Season 5, Episode 23
the serial number..
11 October 2019
Cheers

Glen and Les Charles along with James Burrows created a sitcom that never completely created havoc as it should have. It still baffles me considering the reception it received in cultural world. That is not to say that it doesn't hold a valuable position. It is just that I would request it to be put up a few places higher. For there is this impeccable emotion passed on throughout this 11 years of journey that seems surreal to even have existed in the first place. And that simple one word note is sweetness. Almost too much. I am sorry but it is impossible for a series or anything to run nothing but on sweetness for 11 years. 11 YEARS.

And yet, against all odds it does and works. I think it is only because the crass humor that they fill their day time- and it has to and does feel like a day time- with is actually motivated with a flirty language. And no matter what age you are or what culture you come from or what taste do you possess. The grammar of a flirting language is always received with a smile. And that is all this series tries to do. Not a laugh, not a tear, it aims for a light hearted experience and it gets the order done. And it is an order done right in correct order.

And by this you can see why there is not a complete acceptance of this world in ours. Too much of something can be intangible. Even hostile to someone. But I think I would persist on looking its crafting of this self-created genre. If it is assumed to be difficult to watch than it is also difficult to form. Cheers has an environment that may not particularly be your cup of coffee or a glass of beer, but what it remains is a weekday delight and not a weekend wild party. The makers knew it, the cast too and it's time the viewers too.

Norm's First Hurrah

The formal storyline that follows informal tricks and debates is a saucy idea to work through. Unfortunately, the supporting characters have never been able to hone the charm up front, alone on the stage as the other hum back along; they need someone superior.
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