Reviews

3,730 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
The interviews are good, the host was and is not, this is not how you turn an interview around.
22 September 2019
Between Two Ferns: The Movie

I don't want to be that guy that thinks that one should stick to what they do. There is nothing wrong with trying something new. Whether it be physically, changing locations or genres or changing formats. On that note, the co-writer and director Scott Aukerman's film is a fresh peak behind the camera of a lovable show. This might be the pitch at the Netflix office. It should be it. What's best and the worst thing about the film, is the admiration they have for the lead character, the interviewer, Zach. They don't take him for granted. They don't want to lose him. And in order to do so, they are returning back to those old sitcom sugar coated schemes that gathered crowd like controversy does to media.

But it doesn't work. Not the fact that the interviewer Zach and the character Zach are completely different personalities. If anything that should have made it more grounding and fun to watch him play. Watch him juggle the on and off screen face twitch beautifully in the middle of this race against time chaos. And instead what has happened is that the crux, the thrill of those interviews have been snatched away from us.

Now, despite the insults are audaciously wrong and cuts deep to sensitive parts of the lives of these celebrities, the intention, the motif paints itself like a commercial strategy. A strategy that Will Ferrell explains and has based his empire on. The click bait theory is glorified by them inadvertently. And something that is actually menacingly taking over the authenticity over the data, the enormous amount of data flooded out in the world. Between Two Ferns: The Movie should have been a good weekend night out, instead we're stuck on Wednesday, a week day, working laboriously to finish what we have started. I don't need to be reminded that.
4 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Ad Astra (2019)
A cry for yearning to accept, you either let go then or rattle yourself to stand alone and fly alone.
21 September 2019
Ad Astra

Point. And another point. Hopefully another followed by one other. The storytelling of a film- let us stick to that, for now- has been of these various points, stringed strongly by profound characters with profound theories pulsating on that attention grabbing screen. We jump from one to another, float, skip merrily, exhale boringly and criticize ambitiously. These formats have been kept in front of us over the ages in cinematic history. But lately, I found myself with extravagant projects standing against those obligatory notes; that they, the writers, the makers, are told to deliver, and reject the hypothesis, the notion on succumbing to those elements. "That's the spirit!" is my reaction, and the cinema takes its turn towards new possibilities.

Almost like a new exploration. Something that is extra terrestrial to us. And I'd be disappointed and not angry, if years, decades later Ad Astra, co-written and directed by James Gray, won't get a nod for this analysis. The film is set in the future which has got only one thing to bring alive in that fabric and that is the fact that the quality of the filmmaking is higher, mature, than what we receive and might even deserve. We are not ready for this kind of a show. I was not.

There are themes so pure and alone out there in the space, stripped emotionally by Brad Pitt, that horror seems a by product. A by product that you fall under it, every now and then, amongst this post social media world. This hitchhiking version of the sci-fi adventure that we have never even thought of, has a man single handedly pull up a sun. A star. And it is that pull which Gray feels in Pitt's friendship over the years and that same pull that has kept Pitt young on the screen; artistically, his performance is still raw and decolorizing.
2 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Suits: Thunder Away (2019)
Season 9, Episode 9
and you're standing right in front of me..
20 September 2019
Suits

Suits; created by Aaron Korsh, is a series that has its selective audience for its eerie dramatic conflicts and a keen insight on the law firm as it goes from up and down. Infamous for its witty lines, complex writing and depicting the brutal ongoing drama behind law and order, it found its way walking on a tightrope from the first frame on nothing but sheer brilliant writing skills that defines and justifies its fame. But unfortunately as series started aging on screen the drama and emotions grew more shallow and textbook along with the relationship melodrama that usually feeds itself on petty and cheesy writing.

The complexity between Rick Hoffman and Gabriel Macht has been a game changer and a trump card of the series that works every time as a savior. Patrick's character fades off into its dull love track far before it even finds itself resulting it into the weakest link on it. The humor that used to fit in smoothly and balance the tone, seems forcibly installed in its latter season that barely draws in a chuckle.

It is rich in technical aspects like its stunning camera work with alluring visuals and up beating song which have always been a huge part of the series that makes it supremely watchable. The performance has always been a flight risk since the only cast that comes off convincing here is Macht and Hoffman whilst others struggles to deliver. Its beautiful cinematography, competitive arguments, slick courtroom drama and Macht at the heart of it, are the high points of the series which makes it, in its latter stages, more annoying than disappointing, as all of it is shredded into pieces.

Thunder Away

This episode has every right to be bad and every to be good. Even among the best, some might argue. Aforementioned, while the actual filling between the character arcs and dotted plot points, the episode might suffer miserably but as a whole track looked from afar, it feels dazzling. And maybe that's what the series has always been a victim of. The hour long runtime wasn't ever able to shuffle the cards as it was anticipated and then at the lost moment, just as it happens now, the winning cards in their pocket would have to save the day. There are tons of issues in this episode but with ferocious pace and hot heads firing around in a Western genre alike action, the tension creates the impact just as it used to in the early days. It had been a while since I saw an episode of Suits and didn't want it to end. This is it.
4 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Snowpiercer (2013)
The slow motions should not be taken for granted, only great, great filmmakers know how to shoot it.
20 September 2019
Snowpiercer

Joon-Ho Bong, the co-writer and the director of this dream project sectioned under sci-fi is constraining your imagination through meticulously crafted set pieces. In a way one can say that this is completely opposite to the Blade Runner world. While both are actually widening your eyes to behold the threat a film can possess on its society and history. The procedure is completely opposite. Now, one can argue that infinity is the final excelsior or that finiteness is the only excelsior. What cannot be ignored, is the fact Bong's film is a treat. A resource. That can be dug for years to come and still will bless the street with its light.

As you might know by the logline of the film that it resembles a lot with the Noah's ark, the film is actually set in the future with the subtext that the history is repeating itself. And it is that irritation, the annoyance of the inevitable partiality; that is not politically motivated, but historically manipulated that stabs you and the characters in their heart. Even at the brink of humanity or arguably a new age ready to give birth, the human nature is told to be slave of the historians and the lessons they came up with.

This is the commercial line. Incredibly rich. The struggling ones, the artists on the other hand are moving on by collecting what is present in front of their eyes possibly even capturing the moment like a photograph. And hence the reason why our sung hero, Chris Evans, the one, that embarks himself on a journey to move forward at a great price, that once again, his older generation had already paid. Snowpiercer is a many thing, 300 words cannot define it, just as two hours and a train couldn't; the finiteness lost because of the mole that spoiled the essence.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
World War Z (2013)
The visual effects isn't for gathering crowds but is a concern of their own, the storyline, nowadays, that is rare.
19 September 2019
World War Z

So, poor zombies have been through way too much. By now we have seen them basically every way and everywhere- that's not true. Back then when they started as a witty and witchy horror spectacle to when they were boiled to a mindless harrowing personality to just simply being mindless. Somehow as time travelled, the numerosity became their identity and the only strength they posses. While this is of course not the reality- in a comic con language obviously- there are few spins that has tested well among the audience. Comic being the major one. And then comes this Marc Foster project or more like Brad Pitt project that takes it seriously.

For they have a source, Marx Brooks whose book the film is novelizing has managed to come up with a solution that is not a headshot or a parody. And as far as that "novelization" genre is concerned the film aces on all levels. The character gets enough room to spread their legs and walk as slow and act as they wish to. And that is the only section where this summer blockbuster is different from any other punching bag game show.

And what's medicinal to the film is the concept itself. What they were endorsing about. Very few times do we get a product that gets the identifying quality of it on the spot. And for that scene- you'll know which one am I talking about- this war is worth it. Speaking of it, the title is almost too perfectly titled. The zombies were never previously shown so passionately. Their aggression is their hobby and not something that they are slave of. And hence emerges this description of brutal insensitive images that are painted horrifyingly by the CGI artists where they whispers World War Z instead of screaming.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A rare cinematic art that never romanticizes his protagonist and instead he does, Brad does, with his performance.
19 September 2019
The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button

David Fincher is a controversial director in my house. Sophisticatedly picant in his language, his direction matches Steven Soderberg's capability of three dimensional perspective. And if looked upon, their careers have been similar. They both are known for the direction and not the writing. But David is ahead in popularity. He has captured some catchy stories including mystery novels and even biographies about arguably the most famous face of 21st century. And this is where I trail off. I haven't always been so giddy up about the material he gets on his table. His direction exceeds the script he gets.

And among few times when he has been blessed with an awe inspiring content, this would be the Holy Grail. This old style filmmaking that Fincher turns towards is a delightful gift to his fans. There is an unprecedented calmness in this film that makes the audience present in that frame. For three hours you are told to sit beside a death bed in a hospital room and you have never been honored like such in a Fincher set. A major character is of course Eric Roth's signature element, innocence in the film.

A film that provides every possible database to be found in this long weekend that we call "life", it never puts any vice in these characters. Even the bad ones. The ones holding their promises to the other side of the door. And as far as the protagonist, Brad Pitt, Benjamin Button, is concerned, he is written like a wise old soul. The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button, to me, was exactly that, as in what made them decide to write him as a mature personality affecting these many lives around him, the writers explains it by claiming him the most experienced or oddly experienced.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The film flows in a reverse direction, the drug loses its effect and every bait comes out.
18 September 2019
Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind

Now saying that, for a debutant director George Clooney, this is an excellent achievement. It would be misleading, since this is an excellent achievement. But for any director. And I say that for the film juggles both humor and drama with such ease like even his, Clooney's crime partners weren't able to. And I am talking about Coen Brothers whose filmography in these genres never communicated to me. But I think he is deriving more from his old time buddy Steven Soderberg. The way he makes a hustle fun, it is simply inspiring. And Clooney has got that same sense of humor in his bones. From panning out cameras and using them as the gun to shoot jokes repeatedly is the best comic character of the film.

Just take Brad Pitt and Matt Damon's cameo for instance. I have never seen a better use of a special appearance or having famous celebrities as friends. And it might not seem in early stages, but it is vital to the plot line. The images, the punch lines, the expression, everything stays with you, just as it should, just as Clooney was hoping for. What film lacks is the commercial structure that builds up towards an antic and ends on the highest pitch it can achieve for a cathartic finale.

Luckily, Clooney isn't looking to satisfy the audience but himself. And that's his big win. Obsession to please everyone didn't take his film away from him, contrary to what happened to the lead character. Charlie Kauffman's sharp screenplay and Sam Rockwell's balanced performance are just another factors elevating the Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind. As an intense drama, the film only fully comes alive when it focuses on individuality, the loneliness strikes a jaggering thunder in those quiet moments.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The BFG (2016)
Rylance is an exceptional performer, not the meltdowns, but he makes the "good morning" count.
18 September 2019
The BFG

I know that there are tons of visual effects studios that throws their fliers every month on your face gloating how far and above has the technology reached. I am not even rummaging around the storytelling and the quality of it yet. Just visual effects. Pushing their own selves, what they had achieved previously. Previous month, actually. Yet there is not that joy. That wow factor. If anything their definition of it has turned into incoherence. Shuffled up only to belittle us both mentally- that's a pseudo effect though- and physically.

That scale is the apt term to be used to describe the director Steven Spielberg's dream project. Since the two main characters are of a completely different scale, the visual effects is honed in a way that this theme doesn't get deteriorated amidst all the razzle dazzle. And the cinematography is factoring in on this majorly. Just watch the way even the slightest moment flows along with you. Picking someone up from here to there, that sums up the entire film.

For that very germ of an idea sprouts the car chase game, the dream catching sequence, the recipe making metaphors to a delightful tea party. Not only we are reminded perpetually about the gravitas, the magnitude of the banality that the story moves towards, but also the fact that it is written by two childish characters. And if you won't be able to filter out the difference. The film will come off a bit presumptuous. While it actually is meant to be. The dots connected are odd and questionable. The plot skips are actually not a narrative decision but a character description. The BFG is an odd cookie, a coffee doesn't go with it neither does tea, the bubbles go up and a blessing rain is a curse.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
No one does it like Johnson, not even the past Johnson, what witheld him previously, is now boosting him calculatively.
18 September 2019
The Brothers Bloom

Johnson is my hero. Never has he disappointed me and neither will he- that's arrogont and stupid. The writer and director Rian Johnson has a meandering plan in his mind. And with an experience like his, he gets it right out of his vision just as it was anticipated. Light hearted summer spectacle that is not only entertaining but immensely witty. And these are big shoes to fill. Plenty have come and gone and tried to balance the good old drama and humor duo. Luckily, Johnson has an excellent duo, enacting as brothers for life, Adrain Brody as the sombre romantic and Mark Ruffalo as the dazzling mastermind are a perfect match to Johnson's dream. And this is to its most entertaining because he is a smart chap.

He understands the psychology that a genre of such puts an audience into. That state of mind is just as sharp as it would be when you are say cheating on an exam or actually conning someone- those are the only two things I could come up with. This self appointed police always, always tries to belittle any plot twists and turns. And maybe Johnson being one, being a fan, puts a spin around the whole game and manages to stay two steps ahead of you.

You can see him make moves, you can see him bluff, but you cannot catch him. The nuanced notions that you observe and speculate everything revolving around it is taken account in narration as well. And hence you get these little euphoric dose every now and then where Johnson discloses the curtains and the tail you think you were following was a practical joke. Back to zero. And it is that do over process that makes The Brothers Bloom a staggering display of proper character study.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Monos (2019)
It is a film that is not advised to see at night or day or alone, just stand on your toes.
18 September 2019
Monos

Alejandro Landes, the writer and the director of this adventure has a way too explosive nature to be coherent in his speech. And yet, everything is sound and clear by the end of the day. The images shown in the film might be the only balanced thing in his world. If it brags about the beauty, the spectacle that these humans are tested around, then there is also this pompous animosity on jolting down your eyes to the last meticulous dilemma one faces in nature. And it is harrowing frankly. The thriller isn't thrilling. It is scary. The sadistic approach barrs not just rationality and loyalty but morality and ethical reasons.

Reasons that helps not only us but the writer itself to structure its set pieces. For if there is no law or rules or any finite boundary, there will be no ecstasy at the end of the line. Yet, the group of characters that we are told about, does so. And not going against each other. It is not you standard slaughter house. But the lease that they keep breaking, from someone who is above them and above them and below them. And it is not just them doing this but someone robs them too.

And now you are thinking that it is fair in this situation. This phenomenon just broke its first law. And in order to whip you or more accurately corner you, the writer takes a detour just to checkmate you. And now you are back to your position. And this is something that happens in the latter stage of the film. After which you realize that Monos is a hostage film. Not captured by some mercenaries but an idea that has apparently taken hold of everyone like a disease, a parasite that is killing us.
0 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Is it a documentary? Is it a parody? No it is Coco cola.
17 September 2019
The Gods Must Be Crazy

Jamie Uys is not particularly a good filmmaker. And he is directing, editing (we'll get back to this later), producing and writing. But somewhere in between these lines, he makes an amusing storyteller. His film isn't pitch perfect. It has the capacity to. It is the Airplane of the spoof movies. If you're going to make a parody you have to go all in. And considering the fact that it can arguably said that it is derived from a documentary style. It would have easily gone far beyond Airplane. It could ground the audience, if necessary. And also it has an incredibly loving, generous, hardworking and more importantly innocent character on lead.

And his nemesis is an empty glass bottle of "coke". This unawareness. The innocence that it digs up while exploring that track of the storyline. I think it was misjudged a lot. If the makers had used this innocence, even if with manipulative nature, it would tear up any hard hearted being. But the film wishes to explore a silly love story. Which too works. Its goofiness is the real treat and not the elaborate setting of the jokes that breathes misunderstood chaos.

And I would draw back to that alienated character- from the world the story is in contrast to- whose equation with every single character is flattering to you. Even his learning ability, he drives good both ways. Good enough to have a successful chase scene. Speaking of chase scene or cars or any wider shot for that matter, the editing is really unearthly. To shorten the runtime of The Gods Must Be Crazy the makers fast forwards the mundane activity instead of editing it out. And what's baffling is that, I think it is a joke played on us, for by the end of the film we play along to all such debaucheries.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
And I thought no one captured the team spirit in a way that Disney does, it's an honor to be proved wrong.
17 September 2019
One Cut Of The Dead

The screenwriter and the director Shinichiro Ueda has made a wrong film. It is not odd, but wrong. A film like this should never succeed. It shouldn't even work. And yet against all odds. All methods. Procedures. Years of experience. History, to learn from. Inspire form. It is a beautiful film. Guillermo del Toro says that within the first ten minutes of the film, you can tell how the film is. And it is rare for a film then to change your mind. And this happens in here. But that was planned. The film is structured in a way to throw you off the hook.

So when the time comes to grab you with both of its hands, the film never leaves you and your sight. And the makers does this by keeping an audience member, even us, at certain moments, in that shot. We are the uncredited character. And the most valuable one. If the first act, the One Cut Of The Dead, that first shot keeps us behind the camera, in front of the screen, where we are now, the fourth wall then breaks down as we start exploring the "making" of that act.

And by then, a character is tagged for enacting like the audience, and his or her reaction is captured perpetually and shown to us. It may even drive your feelings as how you might take that scene. And it is satisfying for these characters to hold the film together- both the one in the film and the one itself- convincing us to participate and enjoy. And this is an important fabric of the storyline. For the last shot of the film is them taking a sigh of relief from working hard. That relaxation isn't something you can achieve, if you don't care for them or if you have not invested in the process.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
By now, you shouldn't even check your watch or wallet or anything, it always will be a Spielberg classic.
17 September 2019
The Color Purple

Spielberg is a kind of filmmaker you can invest on for a longer period. And I don't just mean it because he makes these long films. But because he can blend into any genre instantly. And it is not that he just qualifies for that project. He excels it. His durability is a dangerous skill that he carries so effortlessly. And usually the director Steven Spielberg is famous for working with props. And I was looking forward to this drama. And see how he binds this thick script with various personified objects. But there isn't any. This disappointment is the best thing that happened to me. And to even the film.

This is not your Spielberg film anymore. I think this is more Sergio Leone-isc. The faces are captured. Well, to be precise the emotions are captured. Call it a tensed phase of the film where you see a sweating face or call it an engaging phase where the eyes turn red and insults empower the rage or my personal favourite, a face whispering a peace sign when it was supposed to scream war. These close up shots is what's decided by the director and is then, these decisions that sweetens the bitter pill.

For no one is more present then Spielberg, himself on the set. He makes sure that you are there for that action. No matter how mundane an activity is. No matter if it is just shaving. The Color Purple isn't painted bright by that intense background score or the sheer hatred that ignites the friction between two characters, it is those kids mimicking the actual activity, the shaving, with a leaf as their replica. Something so innocent, scientific and magical can only be present in Spielberg's house. You better warm up, you have to stay for decades here.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Brace yourself for the finale, it is a nail biter, so what if it is rigged.
16 September 2019
Bad News Bears

Linklater has done it again. You'd think that a guy dedicating all his life to drama would repeat itself. I mean that's natural. It happens. No one does it intentionally. And neither does he. The director Richard Linklater is iterating his iconic night once again in this sports drama. The get out clause that his signature style brings in, is entertainment. Living the current moment. Enjoying it. As much as you can. And this is how Linklater tackles the cliches of the genre. The endgame doesn't matter anymore. That is not to say that he doesn't work on a compelling narration.

But now I think he invests willingly more for the distraction that it offers us. And if faking with such authenticity is convincing you, the filmmaking is of supreme quality then that you can only hope for. And Linklater knows that drive like a navigator. He knows all the turns. The ticks. The quick glances. The personification of an object. Everything that you see or you think you see is because Linklater stops time. And there is a half grin on your face with a hint of arrogance that you know where this is going.

Now, this is where, once again, Linklater shows his big heart, generosity, for despite shattering your prediction, he never rubs it out on you. You are not robbed of that opportunity. That joyous moment that you thought you were going to have does come knocking at your door. It is just that it is not in the same face. It is a different face. It is Billy Bob Thornton's. You are just not looking at him the same way. Bad News Bears isn't looking at him the same way. Things are not funny nor intense, the light footed environment isn't just a surprise but a satisfying experience.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An exceptional wreckage, if this was a physical destruction, it would have been a Roland Emmerich film.
16 September 2019
Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari (The Cabinet Of Dr. Calgari)

Robert Weine is often accused of blessing the cinema life with this first horror. And it is scary. Probably because it gives us very little time to breathe. Not in the sense that the film is compact or zooms out in front of us with a great pace. If anything it settles in just fine. Just fine enough to let the debates brew in your head. And it is a sci-fi in that very perspective. If it leaves our head spinning then also encourages to scratch it. And this does not follow an ethical dilemma. It is neither a scale of what happened or the aftermath of what has happened and instead is more like why it happened.

And that's why I am scared. That revelation haunts you. It is not actually the information revealed in the plot- well it actually is- but it shows you what it has been basing all these events on. And that measurement is jarring. For it does not, it never did follow a character but an idea. And when an idea is kept above the humans either coming up with it or passing on, then the world grows scary.

Things get out of control and your fighting back reflection gets cornered into a survival instinct. Where if everything goes according to your plan, you live, not succeed but are just able to breathe. Remember, Weine doesn't let you breathe. For an entire hour, this idea, the myth consumes you destructively. The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari is surprisingly visually aesthetic. Maybe, it is the version I saw, but the way the night and the sun is colored it honors the concept it has to breathe fear in, in each and every character along with you, the audience.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A political satire done well, done so well that it haunts us even now, the truth is not afar anymore.
16 September 2019
The Man Who Laughs

Paul Leni, the early 20th century's most ambitious director, creates an iconic figure, unknowingly. And I say unknowingly, for this was the era where Dark Universal had already animated varied creature or mutants or any other beast-alike figurines as a loving protagonist that sold tickets just as Marvel does now. To be fair, this interwoven storytelling was started by them, back then. And is now the hottest idea on a plate, easily a century later. And Leni might be singing along, if looked from above, to those successfully printed films. But there is a major difference in the way, he brings life to this more-than-human character.

Something you can find in David Lynch's classic The Elephant Man. And it is that the protagonist is never in charge of the room. The film runs and runs and never do you see him in control of anything or anyone. And this is how Leni draws empathy from you. That and, of course, Conrad Veidt's sensational performance. And it would stand alone to those aforementioned Dark Universal films.

For if they have an anti-hero in their driver's seat, the complexity is right there and then, thickened by the plot setting. For you are with those characters till the last stop and their actions, if inadvertently then inadvertently, casting a chaos on society. And Leni is aware of that nature that his lead, The Man Who Laughs, possess. That duality that Dark Universal walks along all the way, Leni instead ignites it like a time bomb. A time bomb that you are waiting to tick off. No wonder that the comic book artists saw Joker in this potentially powerful character. That suppressed emotion was so powerful that it latter boiled out from the film and poured itself in the comic book, Gotham City and Batman's radar.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Just as The Boss and his music, the film has a rocking pace, it will surf right past you, smoothly.
16 September 2019
Blinded By The Light

The co-writer and director Gurinder Chadha is only looking for a sweet film. And he makes it. Simple and catchy. The musical isn't actually a musical and this drama isn't always a drama and as far as a coming of age genre is concerned, you'd have to jump decades back to inhale it properly with a joyous smile and I don't just mean plot wise but filmmaking wise too. First of all, let me come out and say that I may not be the person you should be listening to when it comes to this project- or any for that matter.

Primarily, because there is a lot I can resemble, especially in its lead character. Not to say that I go through those exact series of.. whatever, but if it was 1987, I could easily see myself there. So why was this film buzzed so much other than for political reasons- that's not a good thing to presume. Well, it is because the characters are three dimensional and the world is fairly balanced.

These two factors that often film forgets to fill it in with, leads to a disastrous experience for the viewers. No matter how eccentric your concept is and how big a star you have in your pocket or how commercially fulfilling the film is. Basically, what film can actually honk you with, is to show that authenticity gets a much better, louder and loving response than break-a-leg attitude does. Also, there is the Eastern culture you get to explore with a hint of English-ness, not collided but physically separated. Blinded By The Light is an homage to Bruce Springsteen and his impact on every single being, music lover or not, his lyrics cut through all the pretentious trouble we every now and then think we have.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Hustlers (2019)
What they think that made it look not sexy, actually did, they needed a better guidance, that's all.
15 September 2019
Hustlers

Lorene Scafaria, the writer and director, is a hustler. Similar to the film, we, the clients, are robbed shamingly. But what's interesting is that the film loses at the end of the day. Not even looking at the intentions of the film, the film, as a story, had an extremely solid argument to walk through that Oscars table head held high. And instead the opportunity is not only missed but chucked away for cheap thrills and manipulative emotional blackmail. And this could have been a worthy Oscars contender and is instead just an Oscars contender.

And I emphasize on how big a mistake they made, on going light on this material. What the film industry, in the last few years, had twisted and turned its way out to address the political correctness, is something that the film has in its pocket all along. So now, all they had to do was carve a compelling drama. And instead they are overcooking those same ingredients, that turns into a preaching to the choir tone, within the first act.

The film craves for such moments. If anything it goes all the way around, just to create memorable scenarios, to the price of pacing. And it is not the pace I have an issue with, it is the two page script that is told magnanimously within two hours that I can't just "whoooooo" around. The film is also hard to watch. Not for the justification it attempts to give its characters but also the justification that it doesn't give to its characters. And it is not the narrative but the visualization of that crime scene that makes it horrible. For if told properly and rummaged around the files, dug deep into their homework, you will find a sweet spot to explore that would balance these Hustlers.
2 out of 9 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Downton Abbey (2019)
It does not happen everyday when a royal family comes knocking at your door, maybe that is why the night was so charming.
15 September 2019
Downton Abbey

The director Michael Engler is a proud member of the family. Jullian Fellows, the writer's work can be a daunting task to hone into a linear narration. That, right there, is a success. That is not to say, the film is one. In fact, what you feel before entering the screen is exactly how you feel when you leave. There is no change, no convincing. This two hour special doesn't change a dime. And the structure is both upsetting and the liberator. Time after time, snippets after snippets, the film bounces back from one character to another, juggling us, to whom (the characters), by the way, the writer feels this unexplainable urgency to weigh them down by a certain spectrum of emotion, which hisses back at him for its radical notion of being edited out as a cry for help.

So much whining. So much screaming. So much gossip. What helps then is the urgency. There is also this rush. The pace. That has to be maintained. The unstoppable current that helps majorly especially when we, as an audience, are uncomfortable in that situation. The bratty nature breeds this behaviour. And this involuntary reaction does make sense. It is something we can all relate to.

The theme of Downton Abbey is basically taking over your property, as in what makes you who you are, the comfortness, the homeground to your sport. And the writer is the real trickster. To satisfy the fans of the show, he is taking away everyone's characteristic, teasing us, begging us to give it, give them back their identity and when he does, you are satisfied with the product. And it is a product. A commercial one. There is no doubt about that. The only "get out" clause, the excuse, the makers have is that it is done with some panache, that same arrogance that helped them build that castle.
4 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Burnt (I) (2015)
Plenty of dressing, plenty of sauces to choose from, the main course, though, is undercooked.
14 September 2019
Burnt

John Wells has a troubling script in his hand. And it is supposed to be shocking. Steven Knight wrote the screenplay. You don't expect something like this from him. Although, every word of the film is subtexted with his signature all over it. The film takes odd turns and you'd go, "Oh! Yeah. This makes sense." And that is all the sense you are going to get. The director John Wells' film is troubling for it never knows what it is. In present. What it breathes and feels. The film is well aware of the trajectory it has to follow. It is mapped out meticulously within the script. What it doesn't know, is how to behave.

More importantly, express. Tons of action in the film, the decisions made by the characters or maybe even improvised by the actors are incongruent to.. well, anything. You need double checking on what it just chose to do or be. Is this the storyline are we supposed to follow? Predictable in its entirety and messy in its root. The only one coming off as a winner is Bradley Cooper. He is given one eccentric character to portray.

And he oozes power exactly how it is written on the paper. That is, once again, not to say that he is perpetually giving his best. In fact, the first act of the film is driven by him and it is in safe hands by then. His name is a myth that anyone would gladly love to listen to and gossip about. And he lives up to his reputation. He uses his celebrity persona, various charming tactics and passionately rude behaviour to overpower others. Burnt is about one character and all they had to do was hold on to him, they took him for granted.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Gold Rush (1925)
Always a delight to be face to face with Charlie's love, I mean it is the foundation of the love stories we grew up loving.
14 September 2019
The Gold Rush

Chaplin is not obsessed on seamlessly flowing his content in front of your eyes. And there is nothing wrong with it. Maybe he comes from an era like such. Or the history that he has picked up. Not even others but his own. He came from those silent films. Intertitles are a part of a narration that he can never leave behind. Hence, the constant reminder of a story being told, beautifully parted but never a stream of success. Each act is to be set up, the introduction is then reviered into a plot dilemma solved by the characterization of those characters spiraling out the very first act.

And hence, the writer and director, Charlie Chaplin's The Gold Rush is split into three acts. The home, the journey and the returning of the home. The film is oddly sketched for the last act is actually humorous. And the first two incredibly intense and moving. While the first one deals with human nature, the second one is a love story that I am gullible for; instead of its known manipulative nature, either way, the affection gets to you.

And you know it was a milestone then, when almost a century later, now, you are in the hot seat for this couple to make amends as soon as possible. I would like to mention the brilliance of Chaplin's sense of humor in the first act. He is carrying some big guns and dark sensitive material to post it as a character build up. But what's captivating is how nuanced his humor is. How much aware should you be of your content to draw out impressive chuckles like these. Between two men fighting, where Chaplin is clearly not the guy with the muscles, all he has to do is get out of that situation and not actually get out of the room, that small section of the film is him dodging all the cliches.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Suits: Prisoner's Dilemma (2019)
Season 9, Episode 8
buttery fingers..
14 September 2019
Suits

Suits; created by Aaron Korsh, is a series that has its selective audience for its eerie dramatic conflicts and a keen insight on the law firm as it goes from up and down. Infamous for its witty lines, complex writing and depicting the brutal ongoing drama behind law and order, it found its way walking on a tightrope from the first frame on nothing but sheer brilliant writing skills that defines and justifies its fame. But unfortunately as series started aging on screen the drama and emotions grew more shallow and textbook along with the relationship melodrama that usually feeds itself on petty and cheesy writing.

The complexity between Rick Hoffman and Gabriel Macht has been a game changer and a trump card of the series that works every time as a savior. Patrick's character fades off into its dull love track far before it even finds itself resulting it into the weakest link on it. The humor that used to fit in smoothly and balance the tone, seems forcibly installed in its latter season that barely draws in a chuckle.

It is rich in technical aspects like its stunning camera work with alluring visuals and up beating song which have always been a huge part of the series that makes it supremely watchable. The performance has always been a flight risk since the only cast that comes off convincing here is Macht and Hoffman whilst others struggles to deliver. Its beautiful cinematography, competitive arguments, slick courtroom drama and Macht at the heart of it, are the high points of the series which makes it, in its latter stages, more annoying than disappointing, as all of it is shredded into pieces.

Prisoner's Dilemma

What fans were robbed of, in the previous chapter, they are overly stuffed with their favourite flavor of action in this one. And that is all there is. Action. Crisp, wholesome sinew of what the series often refers to as the apt imageries for the loud background score. And if Harvey is thrown straight throws to hit it out of the park, the rest of the cast gets a questionable look. For instance, Sarah Rafferty's actions doesn't quite add up in the narration; just as her existence in most of the scenes in later seasons. The series also addresses trending politically correct topics to lure viewers with a self appointed position of being a "cautionary tale". But it is not the addressed issues that is the issue but the way it is addressed.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Game (1997)
I use the word "bratty" for the way it is endorsed, there is no thrill if there is no empathy.
13 September 2019
The Game

Fincher's bratty film is in no way near the genre it claims for. Not thrilling, nor mysterious, no drama. The only possible way it would fall under the section "crime" is if we arrest it for forging the documents on applying it under those above mentioned genres. That was way too harsh. So I should take some heat off and put someone worthy on the stand. And it is not the director David Fincher. He shouldn't be blamed at all. I wouldn't even call it his choice. And instead it is the writer whose desperate pointless venture of creating a mind bending experience for the viewers fails repeatedly in the film.

And it grows annoying to be honest, after a while. The eye opening revelations are hair pulling disasters where the predictability is just a cherry on top. Where the only thing sad above the fact that Fincher has to keep all this mess togethers, is that someone talented as Michael Douglas has to go through the banal set of rules for The Game.

Mostly, I find people around me gushing over the nail biting climax and to be honest I don't mind the old flip and turn show. I couldn't care less. No matter how much hard Christopher McQuarrie tries in Mission Impossible: Fallout, he could barely draw out a nod from me. But that is only because we know that those fireworks won't ever glorify your night. The real crux is on how clean and precise you are on spiraling out the web of lies. Especially a film like this that has to keep its audience in the dark all the time. And that is why I love the first act of the film, it is properly polished, beautifully edited and smartly directed. The obvious things never go loud and if they do, they are intended to be.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Abyss (1989)
Cameron understands each individual emotion so perfectly, almost humanly, that you have to give in.
13 September 2019
The Abyss

James Cameron's another sci-fi adventure surprisingly doesn't resemble with Ridley Scott's Alien but Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters Of The Third Kind; I know that's a lot of name drops, but I am going to try and write about the film with as many references as possible. Like how the film also resembles with Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later in the sense that nature doesn't behave as an evil entity (just as Anne Hathaway whispers it beautifully in Interstellar) but by the humans at the point of crisis.

And it is simply moving to see a visual galore like such, fit in both socially and politically. Usually you'd have to enter a different screening for that amount of drama. Speaking of drama, Cameron is monetizing the film by doing something impossible even for now, I am not even going over the fact at what year was this released. Perhaps this has always been his style or motto or identity, he has always been ahead of both the technology and expectations of a movie goer.

If he has kept his arms tied on pushing the boundaries as a narrator, he certainly directs then, all his guns towards the embroidery of that iconic fabric. While making such green screen CGI mashup, Spielberg has always said that he prioritizes his animation on having emotional bond with the audience. And Cameron with his wit is weaving a nail-biting drama from such technical aspects that you wouldn't expect it to be anything beyond a distraction or a matter of panache. There is celebration with that technology, but surfing for almost three hours, he terrorizes the textual communication that we are told, comes from The Abyss. Now walking in the dark alone is really scary, but someone or something strange present in that darkness is on a whole new level.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Runaway Bride (1999)
Even when they slow dance after being with the audience for a while, I didn't see any spark.
12 September 2019
Runaway Bride

The director Gary Marshall, I think, didn't see this coming. And I know no one presumes the film to perform bad. But there is a certain level of expectations, a ballpark figure, a certain range that it would cover. This is a total disaster. And to be honest I can see what could be the birth of this idiosyncratic idea that it plants so proudly in this farm. But as I have always said an idea isn't everything. At least we can agree in this show business by now is that no idea is stupid. The depiction of a smart idea done poorly comes off stupid.

And no matter how stupid an idea, if executed carefully, we have seen such films turn classic instantly, take MASH for example- the Donald Sutherland one. But if a stupid idea is project stupidly, it's a stupid film, in capitals; just as stupid as using this word these many times. Still I'd like to defend the film. And you can only do it with Julia Roberts, its finest asset colored totally lazy in the film. The film's actual odd and even contradicting nature comes because of her character and still there is a lot to explore there.

That is of course, not to say that the storyline in any manner justifies the decisions of the film. But for a brief period, her character shows us something profoundly mirroring to what our society whips us with religiously. And when that note, which is either rushed on questionably or the makers were not aware of the magnitude of its brilliance, hits the screen there is a comforting realization and surprise in our face that a film of this genre usually does not offer us. Runaway Bride is still a forgettable date movie, I mean I can't even promisingly say that there is some chemistry.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed