Reviews

42 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
Macario (1960)
10/10
What's for Dinner?
14 December 2017
Writer B. Traven's, cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa's and film-director Roberto Gavaldón's 1960 masterpiece 'Macario' appears at first to be a wonder tail for children, a little fantasy - filled with marvelousness. But then, its poetry (albeit it never resigns from its esthetic) turns into a tragic dejection, and soon you realize that you are in the impossibility to step back. Life has trapped you, nobody looks out for you - death enters you when you're born, and you carry it around in your livers, your stomachs, your hearts. Each candle goes out by itself. 'Macario's daring and ruthless realism hits you sharply, suddenly - as with its first spoken dialogs and captivating scenes. All illusions, romances, sentimentalisms, understandings drop unexpectedly from your entrails and your skull... and surprisingly long time before your death.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Man on Wire (2008)
10/10
You Have to Exercise Rebellion
14 December 2017
James Marsh's Man On Wire is a marvelous cinematographic moment. Philippe Petit's very first vertiginous step on a steel cable anchored at a height of 1,368 ft (417 m)) transcends the laws of man's commonly acknowledged senses and defies how every one of us experiences existence. It's all about human immensity - It reminds me the first powered flight of the Wright brothers in 1903, but first and foremost it calls to mind Lumière brothers' first public screening of their short films in 1895, hand cranked through a projector. It's the extraordinary talent, the creative touch of filmmaker James Marsh in the making of Man On Wire that breathes new life into Petit's sublime walk in the sky. Despite having recourse to still pictures - a step becomes a walk, a walk becomes a dance, a dance becomes life of on a tightrope. Fine-grained clays, of which this motion-picture is made of, are the restored archival color footage and newsreel material, the captivating black and white photographs, the bright and sighted scenes reenactment, the lively present-day interviews and the perceptive use of music. - "It was a misty day, there was a little bit of air that morning." - "I had to make a decision... of shifting my weight from one foot anchored to the building to the foot anchored on the wire." - "Look a wire-walker! He's walking!" - "Something that I could not resist... called me upon that cable." - "It was so... so beautiful". Once more - It is James Marsh's commitment and profound emotional engagement to moviemaking that makes it possible. It is James Marsh's skill that arranges the polyphonic montage of visuals and voices, and directs their interactions. 7th August 1974, Twin Towers, New York City. Philippe Petit was 24 when he completed Le Coup. Philippe Petit is still with us today - "There is no why."
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
A Bird in the Sky goes with the Flock
14 December 2017
'The' Flight of the Phoenix (1965) by director Robert Aldrich. A film that should be shown to every child ready for first day of school. This masterpiece shows both the beautiful and horrifying side of human existence - It is a insightful journey of emotions, panic, hope, guilt, vitality, tragedy. A journey to that what life can be. I won't say much about the greatness of this film, no word could possibly do it justice - but, if you are here because you saw the 2004's "push-button" idiotic remake, then you should compare the two pictures... We might make better airplanes today but when it comes to films forget it - we are yet to find something that comes close to the outstanding performances from famous and respected actors. Time was when the audience could take real joy and pride, going to movies - film used to be fun, it really was. Robert Aldrich's The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) show us the obvious non-intelligence and limitations of human conditions. Today, more than ever, it takes quite ingenuity and will to reach civilization...
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Wolfpack (2015)
Cinema is a Universal Language
14 December 2017
It seems to me that the peculiarity of the pictorial expression of cinema (and its spatial perception) is increasingly ignored by filmmakers; to create movies is possible to everyone, our world has never been so full with filmmakers - is the visual language of cinema arbitrarily interchangeable with the language of global television? Or, is a vlog entry a film? In 1998, I asked Gillo Pontecorvo what is Cinema? - Emotions are the most communicable goods in the world. If a film-director is touched by the expressive, the aesthetic or moral content of a story, it is probable that he'll communicate that to the public. What's dangerous is that nowadays audience, accustomed to triviality and self-deception, does not any longer consider as its belongings what the higher language of true cinema can be. Have you ever asked yourself what has cinema become - what is a good film?
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
An Oddly Deceptive Act
4 December 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Josh Oppenheimer's, Christine Cynn's and Anonymous's (Werner Herzog's?) "The Act of Killing" presents a „truth–telling" documentary about the killings in Indonesia in 1965-66, when more than a million reported communist workers, peasants and Chinese ethnic groups were murdered by pro-government forces (with the involvement of some western democracies) and as well, about groups of gangsters and death squads working on behalf of the Indonesian military forces; perpetrators who remained in power for more than thirty years after these events...

Nearly 50 years later, in 2012, Oppenheimer's documentary empowers and entitles these former Indonesian death-squad leaders to re-enact their mass-killings in any filmic genres they wish, including stylish Hollywood crime dramas and Indian romantic musical numbers... letting them actualize past monstrosities in the present.

So, what to say... the filmmakers, like in the wake of the 1965 military-coup in Indonesia, make the same coup (a cinematic-coup) five decades later, by installing during the time of production an indulging and accommodating relationship leading to a collaboration (and re-enactment – the act of killing) that serves as both self-promotion and self-confession to these murderers; it must have been an easy task for the show, because these men are feared to this day (in a scene, one of the assassin demonstrates how he can still extort money from some local Chinese), celebrated as heroes and still supported in many aspect by the actual government.

So, what to say... the weakness of Oppenheimer's movie is the film's alleged truth-telling; how could any form of re-enactment provide a substitute for truth? Oppenheimer's amateurish or ambiguous approach to film-making does not allow him to understand that 'truth' cease to be, and never is, the justification for a film existence.

You admire a work of art as a thing in itself, wherefore, a painting, sculpture, poem, or any other product of the creative arts, (especially those with strong imaginative or aesthetic appeal, like music and film), actually contributes or merely points to a quality of existence. Art things do not provide a substitute for it. There is not such a thing as truth-telling in cinema. Cinema is a language, and as such, Josh Oppenheimer's truth-telling can only be his-story telling.

Telling history! Why chose a half measure, why mistake the film for real life, when the filmmaker could have gone all the way. This could have been the brilliance of the film; bringing us face to face, like facing a mirror – the evil nature of mankind. The stories that "The Act of Killing" tells are unforgettable, largely unknown by the wider world, and need to be told. Nevertheless, the movie still comes away oddly pernicious and deceptive.

So, what to say... watch the film's ending. Manipulated by the directors (occupied in the search for an unreachable truth-telling), the ending scene of the movie shows the disgust an aged killer feels for himself as he throat retches and ass whistles while visiting the killing site in 2012. Was it another re-enactment? Who could tell? Oppenheimer doesn't want or doesn't dare to tell that to the audience.

What to say... watch the ending scene again, the way it is represented (as with other 'truth-telling' scenes handed out all over the movie): at night-time, a grey-haired killer gains access through the wide open entrance door of a store (once upon a time a cinema), the lights are turned on, no one there, upstairs there is the spot of the killing, the crime scene props lay there ready to be used...
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Sand Woman
4 May 2017
Warning: Spoilers
The title of Kōbō Abe's 1962 enigmatic novel "Suna no onna", from which Hiroshi Teshigahara's 1964 homonymous movie was taken, is translated into English as "Woman in the dunes". However, the correct translation of the original title "砂の女, Sand Woman" brings us closer to what this cinematic masterpiece is all about; whereas "Woman in the dunes" calls to mind a too much of a personal history of one's existence, "Sand woman" points to something that is beyond "the certificates we use to make certain of one another". Life is not in need of identification cards at all. Everything is fated, nothing depends on man, for he cannot find anything to depend upon either within or outside himself, "both completely buried under particles an eighth of a millimeter wide – you can't fight it! It's hopeless!" Everything you'd have thought and brought up will be blown into the wind. Has there ever been anything man could control? "Are you shoveling sand to live or living to shovel sand?" Cinematographer Hiroshi Segawa's wondrous writing is intensely visual, is deeply sensual... A remarkable work, a movie experience you'll never forget.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Silence (I) (2016)
1/10
One More GMO From Hollywood
12 March 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Friedrich Nietzsche said: "The essential element in the black art of obscurantism is not that it wants to darken individual understanding, but that it wants to blacken our picture of the world, and darken our idea of existence." In her writings Mother Theresa speaks of God talking to her about becoming a sister of the poor: "You are I know the most incapable person, weak and sinful, but just because you are that I want to use you, For My Glory! Wilt thou refuse?". Scorsese's struggle with his cultural heritage – all its imprinted Catholicism – made him become a parody of himself; incapable and unfit to direct "Silence" (2016). This film comes with a sense of a void, it has an awful emptiness, woefully filled of sentimental Christian mysticisms. A sellout of everyone's neighbor love, a benedictus from the Catholic Church. If there was anything at all in the film, it made me discover Masahiro Shinoda's "Silence" (1971 - Original title: Chinmoku), a much more eloquent, impressive movie. The once 46 years young Scorsese came under criticism from bigoted Christians over "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988)... what Pope Francis thinks about today's venerable Scorsese's missionary Silence I don't know, but to me it seems this Hollywood was made only "For the greater Glory of God".
3 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Sold Way Overpriced
14 April 2016
Warning: Spoilers
how to sway the audience's opinion that this very elegant piece of 'film' is nothing but an deceptive 'movie'. It is often said that revealing too much would ruin the surprises that come. But revealing the most possible reality is precisely what makes a good movie cinematically exist – it is the movie's unique closeness to reality that reveals what the reality hides, not the other way around. Why insult the audience's intelligence? Tornatore made with "The Best Offer" (story and screenplay) a painfully trivial film, produced and -consumed again and again for passive, unthinking spectators. Perfectly forgettable assembled pieces of an roll your eyes automaton – and even Morricone's looped strain dies of prostration. There is only one scene that is worth mentioning. It is when Geoffrey Rush strikes Sylvia Hoeks's locked door and admits that he is the one that was hiding in the room.
2 out of 9 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Tarantino's? Call it, Self-karaoke
25 January 2016
Warning: Spoilers
Tarantino's 'The Hateful Eight' never reaches the same level of excitement or acuity of Quentin's earlier cinematic intelligence. Remember the startling 'Reservoir Dogs' and its 'eight' crooks played by Harvey, Tim, Chris, Steve, Lawrence, Michael, Eddie and Quentin himself? I'd say Quentin is getting worse and worse keeping making Tarantino's film. I mean, this new talkie has a glorious opening act though… only up to an awful close-up, Samuel L. Jackson's face, as if he had come out fresh from a hairdresser parlor... well, from there on, the movie is just poorly directed. Despite it's been lovingly photographed on heroic 70mm film stock – to me, it's a total lack of empathy, lack capacity for hope, fear, love, hate. Shallow emotions, why bother? He once remarked: "When people ask me if I went to film school I tell them, no, I went to films" – that was Quentin at its best. Today's lesson for Tarantino: "if you do a pastiche don't do a pastiche of your own style".
34 out of 68 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
A unique poetic cinematic montage
21 December 2015
"The Thomas Crown Affair", 1968, a fantastic film by Norman Jewison. Hal Ashby as an editor and associate producer made a meaningful artistic contribution to the film. A lot of people remember this film as well because of Noel Harrison's song "The Windmills Of Your Mind" (music by Michel Legrand, lyrics by Alan & Marilyn Bergman). Two wonderful actors: Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway, and many other remarkable artists gathered together. A time when experimentation and artistic freedom brought us captivating cinematic storytelling. Exciting, cynical, extremely beautiful, delicate and humorous – until film-making felt in the hand of the corporations and their marketing departments.
0 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
The Missing Jack of Spades
15 September 2015
Knight of Cups a film by Terrence Malick, a film edited by A.J. Edwards, Keith Fraase, Geoffrey Richman, Mark Yoshikawa… commissioned, produced, empowered by two hundreds other people lugging one thousandth of a meter behind… Mr. Malick, how could you have allowed this to happen? didn't you have the insight or that achieved mastery to prevent it? Who knows (no question mark here). Knight of Cups is a pure shiver of love to film making, but a monstrous thing took place, your people tricked you - everything happens for a reason - and with this boring truth they pilfered your vibrant motion pictures, in pieces, out of word out of feel, out of peace, out of one's lifetime, all because that was needed for their – yours? – heavenly announced choir. Dear Terrence I welcome you, call me at any time of day or night, it will not take us more than three weeks – and I'd help you, if you like, to turn your monotonous, hopeless shine - silver - screen to rust.
27 out of 137 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Departures (2008)
1/10
A Stickiness, That cannot be washed.
31 December 2014
Warning: Spoilers
You take something unfamiliar like the fear of the unknown, tailor it to the common assumption of the audience so that you don't force them to think too hard… and you'll get an uninspired film tours the world – withal animate acclamation and trophies and prizes by the apparatus of the official state culture. In this ruinous process, and with the complicity of obtuse moviegoers who desire precisely not to see the unfamiliar, cinema can no longer exist in the way it has always reinvent itself – film after film. Cinematography was the sincere desire of reproducing the movement of the world, of men and women's language, of life. There was no cinema without love and it never had the power of parading soldiers or academic scientists or television people of today; Yôjirô Takita's "Departures" lacks any vital issues that could damage revenues and harm the film's commercial prospects, no payoff for you, you are bought – if of any interest "Okuribito" is an apt metaphor for human-to-citizen-to-consumer-to-consumed.
0 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Whatever it is, That's not a film
31 December 2014
Warning: Spoilers
The subject matter of Jens Lien's "The Bothersome Man" is clear: we ought to live on as brainwashed citizens even after death. So what if the director himself abide such a Hades? Someone was singing years ago – Where do the children play? Let's admit it, "Den brysomme mannen" is a dull pettiness of banality both in its production and its directional joke – What other joke could bring a film to life? Let them eat cake! Few are the eyes able to see the horror of the current filmmaking environment, the forced subjugation and cultural extermination of the current social and economic arrangements. Who are those who make movies today? Do children play anymore? For someone who's able to love would it be possible for him to pay for love? Watch out, you are trained to life as dogs to walk.
0 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Basilisks (1963)
10/10
The Italian, American Graffiti
21 December 2014
Lina Wertmüller's directorial debut "I Basilischi" (The Basilisks or The Lizards) is a 1963 little known wonderfully written and directed masterwork of Italian Neorealismo. This keenly satiric and galvanizing movie features simplicity in both its story and execution; so unique so special. It sparkles with cinematic magic unlike any other film today. Wertmüller's lean, sharp graffito seduces and functions almost like a parable, in a number of remarkable ironic insightful vignettes, pure motives which alone drive the narrative of the picture forward. Filmed in a detached pictorial black and white, Gianni Di Venanzo, post-war cinematographer, made fundamental contributions to Lina Wertmüller's first success as a filmmaker. The magnificent and beautiful Ennio Morricone scores the scenes.
2 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
This Pulp Is The Worst Fiction Ever Made
17 January 2013
One out of the worst money-movies these times. Quentin is keeping exterminating his own film-making; burnt out, there's little chance of recovery. He lost his innocence and the genuine investment of the real geniuses that have lived. That's it. I have already written about that not long ago; there's nothing more to do for Tarantino than to laugh his way to the bank. What a loss for all involved. I can understand that Christoph Waltz, Leonardo Di Caprio, Morgan Freeman and Jamie Foxx and many others allow themselves to become involved in the making of a new film and, perhaps, in a performance, in a project with a filmmaker who proved he was somebody... but this garbage is denigrating the art of cinematic storytelling, this is compromising the ability for the young moviegoers to never enjoy in the future any resource and representation of life. What's your name? – Django – Can you spell it? An exchange between Jamie Foxx and Franco Nero, the man who first played Django in 1966, a Damned Great Movie, that time has left behind, which happened, for a sterile profit-only engagement, to fit the name. Today, Quentin Tarantino is not – and probably ever will, be able to spell 'Movie' once again – The 'Director' is silent – I know that, strikes Corbucci's Django.
71 out of 125 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Secret (1974)
10/10
Seeking the truth beyond the boundaries of what we are
21 May 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Jean-Louis Trintignant (David) plays a fugitive on the run claiming to hold a unspeakable secret. He befriends with Marlène Jobert (Julia) and Philippe Noiret (Thomas) who are living a slightly dull life in the country. Robert Enrico's The Secret (1974) is a master peace of a film. A real film – and as an omen it reflects very well today's society; where fears and anxiety unfortunately still prevail in our lives. Leading to an increasing fatalism as events move towards a desolate conclusion, the prejudices that lie deep within yourself while watching does not let up until the very last minute… Ennio Morricone's soundtrack is incredible, one of the finest ever, tense and disarming in all the right places. An Amazing Film.
6 out of 7 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Strictly for Empty-Headed
10 January 2012
Warning: Spoilers
All mouths and lips are what "Meet Joe Black" is about, literally: pouting, peeling, teasing, nibbling, licking, slurping. Claire Forlani throws her lips around any moment she can find. Brad Pitt, nibbling soft pink peanut butter, sucks. Anthony Hopkins, a moist breeze, but not better. Marcia Gay Harden as Allison, brain death. Martin Brest, the director here, must have instructed his actors (sentimentally): "as you well may know your lips are the most seductive part of your body and and it is very seductive when you play with your lips and and let's make a three hour film and and whisper all through the place because you don't want to wake up the audience and and whisper it all over when you hold me sweet words like I love you". The actors when signing up for Doctor Martin Brest's lips anesthesia they must have discussed both surgical and non-surgical alternatives in lip augmentation. The director finely performed injections for who didn't want surgery… these techniques result in great improvements but were a temporary solution not good for eternity. Finally, Jeffrey Tambor as Quince is the only one worth watching.
0 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Carlito's Way (1993)
1/10
Little enthusiasm and determination.
24 December 2011
Warning: Spoilers
Probably the worst Brian De Palma film, for sure a distasteful movie, it runs out of energy... watch it twice it'll begin to irritate you. The monologue/narration is bad; it tries to supply some depth to the movie but the acuteness is just not there and it ads nothing to the plot - it reveals the ending at the beginning - depressingly little intelligence here; the movie lacks in punch and does not have the credibility it seeks. Al Pacino and Penelope Ann Miller's love affair is unconvincing, there's no chemistry between the two, their emphasis is often wrong. Thought Al Pacino as Carlito Brigante is quite good, Sean Penn is brilliant as Kleinfeld. Awful script, poor dialogues, soundtrack sucks, extras/rent-a-crowds are ham/bacon bones; it hurts to see such a talented director spend his time directing with such little enthusiasm.
7 out of 19 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
A Magic Potion of a Very Powerful Kind
14 December 2011
A masterpiece from Luigi Comencini. Another masterpiece of an unrestrained cinema that was (for a very long time) inspired and remarkable; Full, alike life... alike a work of art. Luigi Comencini's 'Lo Scopone Scientifico' is entertaining, funny, touching but also sharp, intelligent and intensely sad; it reflects the conditions of many of us: defeat, ignorance and inequality. It's a radiography on how persistent poverty creates a self-perpetuating cycle within the impoverished classes. It speaks of today's democratic societies! Check it out! You'll be amazed how much (today!) you can read out of this movie...Do you know what happens at this very exact time in our history? I'll say it again, check it out, watch this film, you'll know it. Wake up Folks!
9 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Highest level of filmmaking
4 December 2011
Masterly directed by Luchino Visconti this film should be watched by everyone. Le Notti Bianche di Luchino Visconti (White Nights) is an extraordinary contribution to cinematic history. A film you never forget. A mixture of romance, surrealism and madness. Really good movies are so rare that they're worth watching several times. Young actors should watch and study this film. Young directors should discover what film making is. Maria Schell quite simply, wonderful. Marcello Mastroianni is as always exceptionally brilliant. Nino Rota's music capable of conveying a mood and atmosphere. Notice how movies now a day sucks? Is anyone out there who still understand what a good movie is? If so, watch White Nights, a masterpiece.
1 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Junior Bonner (1972)
10/10
A film that becomes a part of your life
9 January 2011
More than a means of entertainment, this film stays with you forever. It provokes you without moralizing, it's an unique and rich cinematic experience, it overwhelms you with its profound language and culture – if there's is something good in the world then it's worth fighting for - a film which reminds you to be part of this quest; you really can't explain, but you feel it and its good enough; something to be proud, because of the integrity, the commitment and sincerity that most mainstream movies don't have. Sam Peckinpah makes it a very good movie, Steve McQueen, Robert Preston and many others make it worth watching it. Unique. Thanks Sam!
0 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Prestige (2006)
1/10
The drowning of imagination
7 January 2011
Why Christopher Nolan's movies are so popular? Until you understand that, you will continue to wonder why people spend a lot of money and time to be imprisoned into dull and boring movies; Christopher Nolan knows exactly what he's doing, and he's known it from the start. And what's that he's got for you? A prefabricated universe dominated by figures with no soul and lungs: his audience likes the excitement of drowning their little imagination again and again; for them, films have to be that deadening and useless - and once they have watched them, they might say 'that was really good' a great many time before they get reanimated - lol! that is all right, because their understanding is so nimble to realize their error, which will be forgotten much more quickly than a dream.
8 out of 26 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Memento (2000)
1/10
Who says this movie is good should watch it twice
8 December 2010
Anyone who says that this movie is good should be punished to watch it twice; this movie is bad and ultimately unsatisfying – who could possibly stand this double torture? Memento (2000) is a failed experiment with motion pictures (these experiments with motion pictures begun in the late 1880s). However, there is also the excitement when an experiment goes wrong and yet you discover something no one else has discovered before: you give to an ignorant audience of moviegoers something they don't know what to do about it and this same crowd will be endless fascinated figuring out what it is. This film should be distributed worldwide for free in a - how to cut a movie back in place editing software package - for laptop dudes.
4 out of 14 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Dear Mr. Tarantino, good film are not toys
8 December 2010
It is as if you exterminated your own film-making. Obviously you're burnt out; maybe you should retire and let new boys take over. Was it all Once Upon a Time...? Have you really nothing more to offer? Is there really nothing more to do (with your inglorious friends) than to laugh your way to the bank? Is this the kind of man you became after wiping the sweat off three marvelous films? Actually, if you allow me a rant, were those movies? or did you consider them toys you had to take apart during your adolescence? Now that you are a full-grown-man, aren't you able to play with them anymore? have you lost the innocence and the genuine investment of the real geniuses that have lived? Good film are not toys, and as with most toys, an adult doesn't play with them because it's ridiculous, a childish things to do. Inglourious Basterds is a reservoirs of toy dogs. I see (for some others out there too) little chance of recovery, and I don't think you will ever grace us again with another stunning motion picture. That's all Quentin!
15 out of 29 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Woody Allen, the missing ingredient
7 December 2010
Warning: Spoilers
Throughout the years I've become less interested in Woody Allen's work and if this is his worst film I quite hope it is. I wouldn't have remembered about it, if it wasn't for a phone conversation I had with a friend short after I saw the film (Vicky Cristina Barcelona was on ARTE France/Germany). The beginning of the movie is a bit bland and uninspiring, but good enough in the middle of a boring evening. So I think: – it's about time you watch a Woody Allen film again! A male narrator voice explains the events on the screen in terse sentences; as I continue to watch I become more intrigued, and halfway though I even forgive the lousy tourist ride around Barcelona (thou I never was in Barcelona, the film doesn't tell me anything I already know about the city). I remain motionless seated on the couch with my eyes open (longing for a change of scenery), in case there's more to it. And then suddenly -it- happens! Maria Elena (Penélope Cruz) holding a gun (imitating Allen's neurotic gimmicks) tries to blast away her love Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem)... what? do I hear the narrator voice again? oh, the blow of mercy – yes, the narrator's voice comes on again and announces with pathetic contrivance that Vicky (Rebecca Hall) returns home to have her grand wedding to Doug (Chris Messina)... Cristina (Scarlett Johansson) continues searching... maybe Allen just had enough and needed an easy way out to end the movie. Mr. Woody Allen, I'll go to your movies, but you'll have to seduce me.
16 out of 22 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed