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The Woman I Love (1972 TV Movie)
10/10
I Give It All Up....For The Woman I Love
18 February 2006
The Woman I Love was one of the most controversial films ever made. The Royals hated it, and banned it from being shown in England. When the movie became sought after in The United States, the film was quickly banned from being sold anywhere. Thus, this magnificent true story seemed to disappear from the face of the earth entirely, only to surface nearly a half century later, greatly deteriorated....but deliciously received with exceptional fervor and joy. King Edward VIII was played magnificently by Richard Chamberlain. The make-up artists were brilliant. Richard Chamberlain with his own gorgeous baby face, and the right touches of make-up, truly resembled the handsome King. The royals, who had loved Richard as Dr. Kildare in the early sixties, were greatly disturbed that he would consent to play this controversial role. Their fury made a lasting impression on the tender-hearted actor, who had lived amongst them with such happiness. The charming actor was known to be an intense people pleaser. Thus, he took an instant dislike to this movie, and expressed extreme sorrow for his role in causing the royals, as well as Edward such distress. He claimed he did not know they opposed this movie, or he would never had done it. He also took a very hard nosed attitude toward his acting ability as a result of the controversy. Too bad, because he was dead "wrong." The actor was magnificent in his portrayal of this troubled and rebellious heir to the British throne. He was brilliant as the somber, distressed, and conflicted King, carefully contemplating his abdication of the throne. Richard could hardly have gone wrong. The royals are not particularly a passionate lot, and Edward's somber moods, and bland personality was easily captured by an actor who has portrayed the gamut of emotions in far more passionate and conflicted roles than this. His portrayal was so real, and convincing, you easily forgot this was a movie, and believed yourself, alone in a room, observing the actual King as he overtly displayed his repertoire of emotions.

Faye Dunaway was a most lovely and convincing Wallis Simpson. Richard and Faye starred together in many of his early films, and had wonderful on-screen chemistry, but were most magical together in this dynamic story. It was easy to forgive the handsome and soul-searching King, as characterized by the great Richard Chamberlain. His portrait was kind to the abdicating royal. Edward, was unhappy as a privileged member of the monarchy. He had always wanted to be "like everyone else." His heart was far from his birthright of responsibilities. He hated the pompous ceremonies, costumes, and rituals that accompanied his role as King. He was distraught with the heavy "burden" imposed on him by his order of birth. His innate rebellious heart had been searching for a way out....long before it found love with the commoner Wallis Simpson.

Unfortunately a very enjoyable and well-acted movie has been withheld from the world over differences of opinion between a very honest man, his royal family,and it's subjects. I came out of this with a profound admiration for Edward VIII, as a man who courageously recognized that for himself, it was impossible to carry out the heavy burden of responsibility, and to discharge his duties as King without the help and support of The Woman He Loved. Instead of living a lie, and seething with unhappiness and contempt for his lot in life, he took action, and stayed true to himself, thus changing his life and history in one major step of courage and conviction.
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10/10
The Wolf howled...and danced in the moonlight...
25 September 2005
The wolf howled...and danced in the moonlight. The Raven watched...enraptured...by his grand display of gallantry.

Many winters ago, a young Winomish Indian maiden was picking wildflowers in an open thicket near her village. Suddenly, out of the corners of her magnificent brown eyes, a sudden movement caused her heart to almost cease beating. She stood motionless, shaking violently with fear, as a huge wolf with steely green-gold eyes, slowly walked within a few feet of her basket. Catching her scent on the gentle breeze, the wolf edged closer and closer. The maiden's pounding heart suddenly skipped a beat, as the wolf was abruptly distracted by a sleek black raven, who flew teasingly close, then quickly retreated to a nearby tree branch. The raven glided toward the wolf once more. She was wild and unpredictable. The wolf curiously watched her with calculating eyes. The maiden held her breath, as the wolf stretched out his long gray body upon the soft mossy grasses...and cupped his large head between his paws. The raven, unwilling to go unnoticed, fluttered brazenly close to the wolf, then gently came to rest on his soft gray shoulder, and they would lie together...wolf and raven...drawing around themselves...the sleek blackness of the raven's mystery...and the unexpected gallantry of the lone wolf.

Many winters passed, and the young maiden was now an old Indian squaw, playing in the open thicket with her only granddaughter. She would smile when she looked into the dark mysterious eyes of this half-breed child. The girl was unusually beautiful and as bewitching as the white man who had fathered her. The old woman had named her Hannah Raven, for the two cultures she espoused. Looking out onto the mossy grasses, the old woman told the girl of the Legend Of The Wolf And Raven. It was the child's favorite story. Each time she heard it, she would smile, and stare off into the forest. She knew...he would come for her...so she watched...and waited.

Dane Corvin came to Raven's Mountain unexpectedly. He was tall and handsome, exuding the appealing strength of a rugged outdoors-man. His favorite uncle had raised him, and the magnificent beauty of the Puget Sound and its breathtaking mountains and forests, had always lured Dane's lonely heart back to the roots of his childhood. The Indians took to him immediately. He fit right in with their passions and pastimes. Hannah quietly observed this gallant stranger. She was particularly fascinated with his steely green-gold eyes. She was captivated by his strength, and unexpected gallantry. Her brother was wary, even suspicious of the new-comer to the Mountain; but Hannah had recognized him immediately. He was her wolf!

The Winomish Indians had always fished the waters of The Sound. Federal laws had deemed their practices illegal, but for many moons it had been a tribal tradition. It had finally become necessary to send a Federal Game Agent to investigate the illegal poaching and selling of salmon. While Dane kept busy gathering evidence from the unsuspecting Indians, Hannah quietly observed. Dane had noticed the beautiful bohemian maiden, and was attracted to her earthy, sensual beauty, and artistic flare. Dane enjoyed being in her presence, and the mysterious, unpredictable Hannah took every opportunity to walk and talk with the handsome stranger. One night she led him to her "secret place" deep in the mountains. Away from the watchful eyes of the tribe, Dane and Hannah fell deeply in love, and began a secret and passionate love affair. When Dane's investigation suddenly turned dangerous, and Hannah's brother was arrested and sent to prison, Hannah learned that Dane was a Federal Agent. Feeling betrayed, she told him to leave, and never come back!

The broken hearted wolf reacted to his pain by retreating from Raven's Mountain for twenty long winters. When he finally returned to be with his dying uncle, he is faced with the fall-out of his love, and the passionate moments he shared with the beautiful Hannah Raven. Dane now has to deal with...hidden revelations...of all that has happened during...All The Winters That Have Been.

Richard Chamberlain and Karen Allen starred in this sensual and passionate love story. Karen Allen was brilliant as the bohemian artist, and his beautiful, earthy love interest. The character of Dane Corvin was a perfect fit for Richard Chamberlain. It was as if he slipped into a very real part of himself. I found this character to be unusually calm, centered, and most captivating. It was difficult to decipher where Richard Chamberlain the actor began, and Dane Corvin the character ended. I believe that is called...magnificent acting. He and Karen Allen had dazzling on-screen chemistry, and the sexual tension was electrifying! Martin Rabbett brilliantly directed this magnificent film, slowly and visually capturing his audience's attention and interest. After reading the novel, which I felt was somewhat trite, the film was even more impressive. It was amazing to see the depths, to which the director, and actors took this poignant love story. This was an extraordinary achievement for Martin Rabbett, and definitely one of Richard Chamberlain's finest performances ever!!
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