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9/10
Desconstruction With Explosives
17 August 2019
Mexican bandit Rod Steiger and his family meet ex-IRA explosives expert James Coburn when he blows up their railroad car, and falls in love. Why not rob a bank? Coburn agrees, but has more in mind. He radicalizes Steiger, makes him a hero to the followers of Pancho Villa as some grand joke.

It's one of Sergio Leon's big, sprawling spaghetti westerns, in which he deconstructs more of the myths of the Old West, and tackles the fashionable revolutionary movements of the 1960s. Coburn may read Bakunin, but he is haunted by the violence of the Easter Rebellion. Steiger is driven by the desire for wealth, but he doesn't want to destroy the world he has grown up in, he wants to be part of it. Both men are adored by the Mexican revolutionaries, but Romolo Valli knows Coburn of old, and knows him for what he is. In the end, they are not creating a better world for people. They are only creating destruction.
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6/10
The Sound Department of MGM
16 August 2019
Frank Whitbeck narrates this MGM promotional short subject. He introduces Douglas Shearer, for many years the head of the MGM sound department. He had got the job because he was the brother of Norma Shearer, the wife of the now-legendary Irving Thalberg. Doug needed a job, no one knew anything about this new-fangled sound system.... so he got the job and learned along the way. He picked up 14 Oscars during his career. Not a bad job.

It's a promotional short, as I said, and it's used to tell you about forthcoming MGM pictures, some of which never got made, or didn't get made for five years. Along the way, you get the usual two-second portrait shots of some of MGM's stars, of which the saying went, there were more than in heaven. There's also a color test of Greer Garson. As a family snapshot album, it's a lot of fun.
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6/10
We Must Have Movies, Too
16 August 2019
This MGM promotional film covers the importance of music to movies, starting with a rather soulful woman singing "The Curse of an Aching Heart", and then a fade in and out to "the first important musical": THE BROADWAY MELODY (1929).

Well, it was important to MGM, I suppose. After that, it turns into an advertisement for the forthcoming MGM Nelson Eddy vehicle, THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER. It flopped.

It was an important period in MGM when this was made. Arthur Freed had been a songwriter for MGM for a decade -- some of his songs were used in THE BROADWAY MELODY. He had been an uncredited producer on THE WIZARD OF OZ, and well working on a series of Mickey Rooney-Judy Garland musicals. The following year would see the premiere of Gene Kelly, and a decade-long sweep of great musicals.

Oh, this ends with a series of two-second shots of a couple of dozen shots of MGM stars. The point of this short is "Rent MGM musicals. They're patriotic" and to prove it, here's Rise Stevens singing "America the Beautiful."
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4/10
Lucille Gleason, Policewoman
16 August 2019
Lucille Gleason is the police woman who supervises the local dance hall. She's friendly and approachable, and she helps out some fallen women by letting them stay at her house. She's out to get gangster Jason Robards, and has been letting his ex-girlfriend stay at her house, after escaping arrest. When Rpobards calls in a complaint about a noisy party, the police show up, the girl olts, and is taken for a ride by Robards. Plus Gleason loses her badge.

It's a decent story, and Mrs. Gleason is fine in the role, but director William J. Cowen can't raise a good performance out of Robards, and the pacing of the dialogue slows down abominably for skilled actors like Laura Treadwell, Dick Elliott and Henry Hall. The result is a 1-hour second feature that seems interminable.
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Shoot Out (1971)
6/10
Nature Against Man
16 August 2019
Gregory Peck has just gotten out of prison and is traveling, looking for something or some one. Meanwhile, James Gregory sends vicious, stupid gun man Robert Lyons to trail him and report back, but not kill him under any circumstances. Meanwhile, Peck gets notice to pick up up a package, which turns out to be a little girl whom he believes is his daughter.

It plays with the western themes of the beauties of nature versus the ugliness of people and their actions. Cinematographer Earl Rath (whose IMDb entry is in awful shape as to credits, and who seems to be alive at the age of 117 as I write this; other sources indicate he was teaching at USC at least as recently as 2002) shoots the mountain country of New Mexico as it fades from fall to winter in a bright, soft light. Henry Hathaway, long a specialist in A Westerns offers a violent, stupid west, where the only defense against evil is a bank robber. Even if it's Gregory "Atticus Finch" Peck, I'm not sure how I feel about that.
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The Dytiscus (1912)
6/10
Learning Something
16 August 2019
I didn't know the name of this sort of water beetle before I looked at this short subject on the Eye Institute site on Youtube, so that's one thing I learned from this early documentary film. It seems that the French production company, Eclair, released a bunch of these, at least in 1912. So that's something else.

It seems to be disorganized according to the way I am used to seeing short scientific films. The disorganization seems unlikely. More probably, it was a change in how scientific movies were organized and edited.

One of the bits I could have done without is the bit where the dystiscus it eating what looks like a newt as large as itself. Whoever ran this series for Eclair seems to have been fond of showing the feeding habits of their subjects.
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7/10
If You Don't Know Whether To Kill Yourself Or Go Bowling, Do What You Did Yesterday
16 August 2019
Teiji Takahashi's boss is looking for summer home, so Takahashi and his wife, Yoshiko Kuga, agree to rent him their house. It will pay for the mortgage. He will stay with a friend, and she will take their son to visit her family. They live in a mountain resort town. It's no real vacation. Hoods from the city are causing problems, and the police won't deal with them. Her sister's ice cream cart business is thwarted by cool and rainy weather. Miss Kuga makes friends with an ex-army officer who hates himself for sending his soldiers to die in the War. He lives by taking money from his separated wife to look after their daughter.

Everyone is living from day to day, treading in accustomed paths, waiting for something to happen, like the poem quoted in the movie; a line of it is the movie's title. They feel as if society has broken down, and there is nothing left to do but wearily return to what they have done yesterday.

It's the flip side to writer-director Keisuke Kinoshita's bitter comedies. It's a study in anomie and despair and very telling, a story of people at a loss how to fix anything, but they still continue out of habit.
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6/10
Some One Runs Fast
15 August 2019
Here's a late RKO-Pathe Sportscope about the breaking of the 4-minute mile. That track record was one that stood for millennia, ever since the Elian Games gave way to the Olympics. It's not that they used the mile, of course, but it's been one since the revival of the Games in the late 19th Century.

This short gives a historical survey of the fastest Olympians from the 1920s on, as the record time drops from four minutes and ten seconds, down and down by tens of a second, down to the actual breaking of the record by Roger Bannister on May 6, 1954 for a time of 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds. There's some discussion and film of more recent runs, up through 1956, when this film was released.

Hicham El Guerrouj is the current men's record holder with his time of 3:43.13, while Sifan Hassan has the women's record, pending ratification, of 4:12.33 as I write this. I expect it will be broken again.
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5/10
Is There A Ghost? Boo! Must be
15 August 2019
Valentine Dyall is a guest at a house party where he tells a story of a cursed house.... the one where the party is taking place.

If anyone could narrate a ghost story, it was the Man in Black, and his slow, fluent baritone certainly made skin creep. The problem I had with this is the unvarying formula of ghost stories like this. A young couple is looking for a place to live. The strange house agent take them to an old, deserted house, utters a few platitudes about how they really knew how to build in those days, and refuses to hang around. At first things are copacetic, and they happily wire the house, repaint it, and we need to do something about that dripping faucet. Then there's the first shock: a loud noise in the other room is revealed to have been a burning log falling off the irons, as they do, and the flames make strange shadows out of known objects.

Then another shock. And another. And eventually.... there is a ghost!

Boo! the trouble is that this is a mid-century movie, and the audience sees the ghost, because that's the way these things were written and shot. It lacks the sense of uncanny uncertainty that the best ghost stories have; seeing, after all, is believing, and once you believe, well, there's nothing unnatural about it. Except the ending, which renders the entire movie a special effects jok
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6/10
Arachne And Her Pals
15 August 2019
A lot of people don't like spiders. In Old English, they were called "adderkops", which means "snake-heads"; it survives in "cobwebs." Spiders are supposed to be ugly, poisonous and a scourge to housekeepers who have trouble keeping their houses clear of webs. In fact, as this short demonstrates, they are quite pretty, keep the place free from the annoying pests like flies, and there is one shot of a massive and symmetric cobweb in the morning dew. It's quite lovely. As for the poison, yes they are. However, it's unlikely you'll run into a spider who can kill you with poison. Taking out fruit flies is more their speed.

It you wish to take a look at this survey of spiders, there's a nice copy of it on the Eye Institute site on YouTube.
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5/10
No, The Present Is Now
15 August 2019
And now it's the past. As the Red Queen remarked, you've got to run as fast as you can to stay where you are. It also helps to believe seven impossible things before breakfast, like believing that breakfast is coming, that nuclear reactors can produce electricity and not just explosions; that silicon gizmos can get power from the sun, the television can be used to educate people, and that someday computers will help run a lot of the world.

Well, four out of five isn't bad -- I didn't have breakfast this morning, alas. It's hard to believe that this primitive-looking movie, that marvels at such commonplaces of today, which include videorecorders, electronic music and making phone calls with pictures -- was considered wacky sixty-four years ago. I was one year old at the time. Look out for the next wacky projection!
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The Busy Bee (1912)
7/10
The Beekeeper
15 August 2019
This short about beekeeping is less interesting to me because of the bees than because of the beekeepers. While one of them dresses in the full protective gear that one associates with the trade, the other picks them up in his bare hands, dumps them back into the hive, and occasionally picks them out of his hair.

Interest in bees go back a long way, because everyone loves honey. Pliny the Elder has several chapters in his immense book about everything in the world and out of it on the bee, so this early short subject on them is interesting. Even so, I would not pick up a bunch of them with my bare hands.

This is one of several documentary shorts from 1912 that have just been posted to the Eye Institute site on Youtube. The seemingly casual and haphazard way they are organized is anything but that; it's simply that there's very little organizing you can do in four minutes of screen time.
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The Violators (1957)
3/10
I Hope The Book Was Better
15 August 2019
Arthur O'Connell is a lawyer who can't get a case because he doesn't have experience having cases. So he joins the probation department and becomes an advocate for keeping kids out of the system. This annoys everyone in the department, and judges, but his compassionate stance works and wins him a promotion.

With success comes something to lose, and when his daughter -- played by Nancy Malone -- is making her boyfriend -- played by Fred Beir -- wait, he braces O'Connell for a business loan. O'Connell says it's too much money, and he doesn't understand, so Beir goes elsewhere, and eventually indulges in a pyramid scheme.

It's a feature based on the book and radio by Israel Beckhardt about the emigration system, and it's a heartfelt and well-meaning movie, with O'Connell quite believable as a Jew. Unfortunately, whoever did the screenplay (Ernest Pendrell?) seems to have never met a Jew in his life, and the direction is awful. Miss Malone plays her role by alternating whining and shouting, and the dramatic tension in the situations seem a bit off.
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Salamanders (1912)
6/10
Odd Critters
15 August 2019
I don't know how salamanders got the reputation of living in fire. but there are no flames to be seen in the 1912 science short about the critters. They live beneath rotting logs and in the water, which is as far from far as you can get and be a cold-blooded animal.

We get to see a goodly variety of the class of animals, including the Mexican axolotl, a species which exhibits neoteny. Now that I've typed that sentence, I should explain that the name of the critter is from pre-Columbian Mexico, ad that neoteny means that, like Peter Pan, it never grew up. Being an amphibian, it never grew lungs and left the water.

Good pictures, and if you want to look at it yourself, it's on the Eye Institute site on Youtube.
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Scorpions (1912)
6/10
It's In Their Nature
15 August 2019
Scorpions are among the creepier land animals, and this nature short from Eclair lets its audience see that for themselves, with their scuttling gait, their choice of habitats -- it looks like a dry sand pit, somewhere, according to the Dutch titles I saw on the print -- and their charming custom of going up to a mouse a hundred times their size, jabbing it, walking away, and then an hour later, the mouse is twitching and dying, poisoned.

That and their getting along with millipedes according to this short. Not my favorite critters. If you wish to look at this pretty good nature short, you can find a good copy on the Eye Institute's site on YouTube. Be warned: the titles are in Dutch.
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4/10
Sally Blane Goes Undercover
15 August 2019
When her brother is conned into "borrowing" bearer bonds from his employer, nurse Sally Blane decides to go undercover with the gang that has them in an effort to clear him.

This very cheap E.B. Derr production has a lot of problems, beginning with the set-up. While the District Attorney might cut a deal with the embezzler to get the gang, that's still a crime. And while the story, after the set-up is a good one, the performances are pretty bad. Director Karl Brown may have been an excellent cameraman for D.W. Griffith and a pretty good writer. As a dialogue director, however, he seems to have had a tin ear.

As long as I am piling on the complaints, "leading man" Lloyd Hughes is on screen for about four minutes in all. Seventh-billed Ward Bond, as the detective who keeps arresting everyone has a lot more screen time!

The story, as I noted, is actually pretty good, once you get past the idea that someone who steals $100,000 in bearer bonds is innocent -- a claim, I imagine, to appease the Hays Office; the idea that the police would cut a deal with the small fish to get to the big ones would not have played well with Joe Breen. John T. Neville wrote the script. He had about sixty credits from 1927 through 1946, for a variety of B westerns and Poverty Row crime stories... and NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK.
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6/10
Fishy Business
15 August 2019
The fishing fleet goes out, it comes back, but it doesn't make enough money, and owner Chishû Ryû's partners can't take the loss any more. They want him to sell out, but it would leave him millions of yen in debt. He has an offer to fiannce it if he will marry his younger daughter, Michiyo Kogure to the lender's son. His older daughter, widowed Yôko Katsuragi also feels the stirring of affection. One of women whose property is backing Ryû's loans wants her property back. His partners turn out to be gangsters. The Fishing Ministry has decided there are too many ships, and the price offered drops in half.

It's a mess, and Ryû has a bigger, more emotional, more active role than any I've seen him in before.

For writer-director Keisuke Kinoshita, this movie is way out of his comfort zone, and the vast number of characters and subplots that connect it together are not solved with his usual panache. However, it is clear that while the men -- ship-owners, fishermen, gangsters, shop-owners, ministry bureaucrats -- may be the ones running about, doing things, it is the women who use the secrets of a lifetime to actually get things done, to war with each other, and ultimately solve their own plots and many of those of the men by revealing secrets. It's not one of Kinoshita's best; in the end, it's a potboiler, with his usual attention to characters. Good enough.
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5/10
Decent, Agreeable, Improbable
14 August 2019
Bank robbers led by Douglas Fowley head out to the suburbs to bury their loot. Along comes a toddler, who digs it up, puts it in a wagon and takes it home. Grandma is Evelyn Varden, a shady lady who likes to play the angles. Daddy is Tom Ewell, a paroled ex-con trying to go straight. Mommy is Julie Adams, a straight-laced young woman.

It's a decently executed comedy of the brittle sort that the studios were producing at this time, rather brittle essays in how people were trying to lead normal lives -- whatever those were -- after the Depression and the Second World War. Amidst long stretches in which nothing much happens while the audience is waiting for the neatly-stacked pules of cash to be revealed, Miss Varden's eccentric character offers some smiles. There's also a nice small role for Herbert Anderson as a blase hotel clerk. However agreeable this movie is, it's never more than that.
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5/10
Lumsden Hare
14 August 2019
This episode of John Nesbitt's THE PASSING PARADE tells bit of the story of Fridtjof Nansen. He had first come to notice as an arctic explorer. Later, he had joined the diplomatic service, and became a leading force in helping international refugees in the aftermath of the First World War.

The role of Nansen is acted in dumb show by Lumsden Hare, one of those now-forgotten actors who played elder statesmen and lawyer in the movies in the 1930s. His career was longer than that. He was born in 1875 in Ireland, awas playing Dr. Watson in Sherlock Holmes productions by 1899, and was one of the earlier actors to portray George Bernard Shaw characters on stage. He made his first movie not after the dawn of sound, but in 1916, and his career ended not with the Second World War, but in 1959, five years before his death.

We sometimes forget that actors are adept at many roles, but producers are making a commercial product, and when they thought of Lumsden Hare, they thought of his "brand".
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5/10
Usual Nonsensical B Musical
14 August 2019
Evelyn Ankers inherits $95,000 if she is married before she is 24. The evening before her birthday she's on a train to Chicago to be married to her fiance, dull-as-dishwater David Bruce, when a bunch of singing soldiers get on board, including Allan Jones. Through the connivance of Miss Ankers' sister, Patsy O'Connor, Jones and Miss Ankers wind up married. When they all reach their destination, Miss Ankers wants an annulment, of course, and Mr. Jones does not.

The first half of this movie is amusing, with several songs, including standards, ditties from the Universal catalogue (including the title song) and Cole Porter's "What is this Thing Called Love". After that things slow down in the way of B movies that want get on with their stories, and the singing dies down. Some bright moments are provided by Billie Burke, Luis Alberni and Francis Pierlot, but Mantan Moreland is wasted as a largely standard train porter, and it's up to Harry Hayden to sort out the situation by having Mr. Jones sing a reprise of "What is this Thing Called Love."
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6/10
Too Bad They Hanged The Baritone
14 August 2019
When the bar is a place where folks have a good time, drinking, singing, and watching entertainers perform. Meanwhile, the church's parson, Dick Foran, has a sparse, elderly turnout on Sunday morning. When two vaudevillians, Fritz and Jean Hubert, brace for for an introduction to the saloon owner for a job, Foran decides to fight fire with fire, and show biz with show biz.

It's all an excuse to put a variety show on the movie screen in glorious Technicolor -- with Technicolor the real selling point for the audiences. There's a knife-throwing act, there's a a pair of rough-and-tumble acrobats, Foran sings a cowboy song and Jane Wyman sings "The Soubrette on the Police Gazette." Some good fun, and the print I saw was sharp and the colors bright.
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A Broken Drum (1949)
6/10
The Autocrat Of The Breakfast Table
14 August 2019
Tsumasaburô Bandô is a terror to his wife and six children -- and the dog next door barks when he comes home. His construction business is in trouble; he's run out of money for his current project and can't get a loan, so he's marrying his daughter, Toshiko Kobayashi, to the son of a wealthy family, who will invest. She doesn't like him. That's not the only source of his dissatisfaction. His eldest son wants to quit his job as an executive for the company to go into business making music boxes. His second son plays the piano beautifully, but doesn't earn any money. Everyone else has their own version of these problems. Plus the household help keeps quitting.

It's a loud, ugly, but ultimately soft-hearted comedy from Keisuke Kinoshita. Bandô seems to have no interest but business, and roars at any in his family who cross him; the dialogue indicates that offscreen, he beats them. Can a family survive such a harsh father? Is there any way to make him change his mind about anything?

The character portraits as drawn in script and actor are good work, but in the end, it's a little too rambling, there are two many people to keep track of. In the end, they pop in and out, disappear halfway through, and appear out of nowhere. Maybe they shouldn't have had so many kids, and it would have been a better, more focused comedy. Even so, it's an engrossing movie.
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6/10
Swedish Comedy? Without A Funeral?
13 August 2019
You mention Swedish films to me, and comedies don't spring to mind. Speak of Mauritz Stiller, Gustav Molander and Victor Sjöström working together and I think of something really deep dish, involving people suffering, stormy weather and thorough misery. Oh, you might get a structural comedy, in which some petty autocrat in a priest's collar learns that other people are humans too, but mostly I expect a lot of snow and anguish, maybe a curse or two. At best, there's a homicidal clown or a series of ex-lovers looking at a corpse. Yet here's Sjöström starring in a comedy written by Molander and directed by Stiller. Well, maybe the unnamed editor had a hand in it.

Karin Molander is a high-spirited girl. When her squire of a father talks about a marriage to a rich count, she'll have none of it, so she runs away to the big city, where she meets writer Sjöström and tells him about her cruel, impoverished life. He's quite willing to believe it, so he offers her a job as his secretary. She accepts, but soon enough he kisses her and she runs back home. So he tells his friend the film producer about it and turns it into a script, while the producer puts a notice in the paper, offering her a job as an actress.

It's a situational comedy, rather than the sort of slapstick that you got in the rest of the world. The gags are limited to the untrained actress performing dramatic roles in a mirror, Sjöström going bumpity-bump down a flight of stairs, and other such moments of hilarity. As a movie farce, it's all right at best. As a Swedish comedy, it's in the top ten.
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5/10
Curtiz Makes This Anhistorical Nonsense Look Good
13 August 2019
This movie was originally released at length of 136 minutes. The version I looked at had 35 minutes trimmed, mostly, I judge, from the beginning, leaving some incoherence in the plot, derived from a Schnitzler play. It's 1809, Napoleon is at the gates of Vienna, and Medardus, played by Victor Varconi, is the son of a man dead in the wars. He is an Austrian patriot. He and Princess Ágnes Eszterházy are in love, but her ancien regime father orders her to marry the Valois claimant to the French throne. She does so, but puts him off until after he has accomplished a mission back in France. She sends for Varconi and tells him she loves him only, will he kill Napoleon -- played by a tubby Mihail Xantho -- pretty please and a cherry on top?

There's also an atlas that everyone is looking for, but I couldn't tell why. I don't think it matters terribly; the point of the movie is the costumes, the Viennese location shots, and the crowd scenes. Director Michael Curtiz is an absolute whiz at crowd sequences, whether they are battle scenes or the milling Viennese throngs. Perhaps those are actually the work of Second Unit director Arthur Gottlein, but I think not. Curtiz would, over the next couple of decades, run some pretty impressive crowd and battle sequences, in works like NOAH'S ARK and THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE.

The historical drama is, of course, rather pointless, since Napoleon did not die in 1809 at the hands of an Austrian patriot, and the incoherence of the cut version only serves to abet the melodramatic nonsense of the story. Still, it remains an interesting movie for its position in Curtiz' curriculum vitae, demonstrating his assured visual settings even at this early stage of his career.
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6/10
Bad Luck
13 August 2019
Alphons Fryland is the son of an industrialist. He is supposed to marry the daughter of another factory owner, when he encounters Lucy Doraine, working at his fiancee's home as a maid. She is forced to quit, and eventually goes at Fryland's factory as his secretary. Her brother, Jean Ducret, steals her keys and robs the factory's safe. She is fired, but to avoid scandal, is let go. Hard luck follows her, and she becomes a debauchee.

It's 6,000 feet of hard luck for Miss Doraine, which Michael Curtiz's movie insists i a matter of fate. At times I found the piling up of bad breaks to be wearisome, and then Curtiz and his director of photography, Gustav Ucicky, would offer an interesting shot: Miss Doraine lying in a hospital bed, hallucinating of drown in a shower of flowers, or a stuntman climbing a tall factory smokestack. There were also some great crowd scenes; by this stage in his career, Curtiz had the ability to direct scenes of mass chaos. It's a talent he would use many times in the coming years.
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