Reviews

9,004 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
The plot follows a well-worn path
16 October 2018
Cecilia Loftus is featured in this three-part picture as its heroine, a country girl who has acted "Rosalind" in Mayville and comes to the great city to be an actress. The plot follows a well-worn path and we think it will be fairly popular, but much more could have been made of it with fresher deveIopment and with broader, less stagy scenes; it is cramped into too small a space and lacks the atmosphere without which it fails of being truly convincing, although its business is all probable enough. Then the girl's father or perhaps uncle (the relationship is none too clear) spoiled the homespun feeling in the home scenes; he is a city man. The acting of Miss Loftus before the camera is fair; she is good in human moments, but intruded burlesque business in the chorus girl scene that decidedly didn't agree with her acting of Rosalind, for example. Her work in moments of transition is not sure as yet. She is ably supported and the picture makes a very fair offering. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Many of the scenes are truly exciting
16 October 2018
A sensational melodrama in three reels, dealing with modern life and taken against a great, partly-built dam or other engineering work. Its center of interest is the contractor's difficulty in getting on with the work. He is short of ready money and the villain, a millionaire, plots to keep him from borrowing on gilt-edged securities he owns. The contractor's daughter repulses the villain and the hero, his clerk, gets discharged for shielding her. This hero is made foreman, and the old foreman becomes a dramatic factor in the second reel by opposing him. The work is protected from the rioting workers by gattling guns (not wholly convincing as shown) and they are loaded with blank cartridges by the new foreman. The millionaire villain changes these for ball cartridges and this act is photographed by a motion picture camera man and, at the trial, his reel is brought to the jury and he real criminal is arrested, it is fairly well acted; the photography is clear; many of the scenes are truly exciting and it makes a passable offering. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Baffles the imagination of the spectator
16 October 2018
A two-part feature offering somewhat above the average in merit. It tells a detective story and has a new situation that baffles the imagination of the spectator, quite fooling him until the detective lays open before us the criminal's method of having a perpetual alibi. Natural acting quite above the average and beautiful photography increase the effect of it and make it commendable as a good offering. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Has a number of strong points
16 October 2018
This three-reel number, produced by Allan Dwan, has a number of strong points. It gives an intimate and convincing picture of tenement life. It develops a pleasing story, naturally and appealingly, and has a number of strong character parts. Murdock MacQuarrie makes a memorable part of the old grandfather. The Italian vendor of statuettes made a good touch, and the silk hat episode contains the right human element. This whole production shows an unusual feeling for picturing real life on the screen. A strong offering. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The photography and settings are attractive
16 October 2018
A two-reel number, with Robert Leonard and Hazel Buckham in the leading parts. This shows quite naturally the manner in which a young wife takes up the enjoyments of her younger friends and this gives her husband the impression she is abandoning him, when she is really assisting others to elope. This rises to a high point of interest which is never quite realized in the action of the characters. It would have been stronger if the climax had come sooner and then worked in the happy ending as it now stands. The photography and settings are attractive and the story very well constructed and presented. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
It is hardly logical
16 October 2018
This two-reel picture may please those who merely view but do not analyze. It is hardly logical in its plot. It follows the old theme of Enoch Arden in some respects, but is weakened materially by a mess of melodramatic happenings that are absolutely uninteresting. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Snowdrift (1914)
The story proves to be one of gripping interest
16 October 2018
This is a two-part delectable production and contains a heap of heart interest. A human derelict is faithfully sweeping snow from the pavement in front of a prominent clubhouse, the members, for the purpose of enlivenment invite him into the parlor to tell the story of his life which he does. His story is of the great northwest, where the snow is on the ground and in the air. The story proves to be one of gripping interest and holds spellbound the clubmen who listen to it. A tragic ending pertains when he recognizes one of the leading members present as the man who wronged him and cruelly left him to die in the drifts of snow. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Will make friends everywhere
16 October 2018
This two-reel western will make friends everywhere. The story is interesting and is quite logically worked out. An acceptable comedy incident is used to open and then follows a series of intensely dramatic incidents. Intelligent direction and first-class photography have added greatly to the class of the release. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The story misses some good chances
16 October 2018
A melodramatic love story in two parts, set in English backgrounds. Many of its scenes are in a forest and the photographs (good all the way through) often give that half-misty suggestion of deep leafy isles that is very pleasing. The story is very fair and will hold attention although few, if any, will be convinced that what it shows really happened or is likely to happen. The heroine changes, between the closing of the first and opening of the second reel, from a simple forest girl in which guise the rich hero meets and falls in love with her, to a stylish city girl. Her evil uncle, now her guardian, is making her help him cheat in his gaming house. He is also chief of a gang of thieves and one turns against him. In an exciting scene the hero rescues the girl just as the disgruntled thief accomplishes the uncle's ruin. The story misses some good chances to be consistent and effective at the same time, but makes a fair offering just as it is. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The characterizations are only fairly good
16 October 2018
This three-part story, written by Bess Meredyth, brings to mind the style of English society stories written by Bertha M. Clay and The Duchess. Cleo Madison appears as the heroine, whose path is beset by much suffering. The scenes, both exterior and interior, are very attractive, and represent a big English estate. The characterizations are only fairly good as a whole, partly owing to faulty costuming. The story itself extends over four generations of time and is entertaining. The strongest moments are in the last reel when the unwilling bride sees the ghosts of former inhabitants of the place and determines to reject the rascally John. As an old-fashioned type of story this gives full value and is handled with a fair degree of strength. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The Skull (1914)
The suspense is well sustained
16 October 2018
At first one grows a little impatient at the obscure development of this story, but later this feeling vanishes when the observer learns that it was all intended for a mystery. What looks like confusion of plot is really a purposely vague style of development. Alexander Gaden turns out to be a detective who has for years been rounding up the villain of the piece. The skull feature was unique and there is a sort of uncanny, expectant atmosphere about the story as it progresses. The suspense is well sustained in the second reel and the denouement is a satisfactory one. Not a powerful offering, but something different and enjoyable. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
For Her Child (1914)
The story is poetic and sentimental
16 October 2018
The "Kidlet" has a prominent role in this two-part offeriug and her presence and charming acting will surely make it go well with most audiences. The story is poetic and sentimental. It could hardly be called a strongly dramatic picture, but there is a most sensational struggle in one scene in which Irving Cummings, as the husband of the heroine and the child's father, fights with a burglar. The acting is fair and the whole makes a good offering. It deals with divorce, and its theme is far from new. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Hardly an offering to stir enthusiasm
16 October 2018
In this two part picture, the title is a bit misleading, or the woman was painted by an artist and did not "paint," so far as we know. An elaborately woven situation is developed into a love story of sentiment, in which William Garwood and Vivian Rich play the leads. Jack Richardson, who, in the first reel, is a half-villain, in the second recognizes his daughter whom, with her mother, he had abandoned, and does what he can to make up. It is well acted and clearly photographed in many commendable scenes. It is hardly an offering to stir enthusiasm, but is a bit better than fair. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A sensational melodramatic story
16 October 2018
A two-part feature offering providing a sensational melodramatic story in which an evil clerk is loved by his employer's daughter who permits him to visit her at midnight, climbing up to the second story window. He later steals his employer's money and a fellow clerk suspects him. This second clerk becomes the hero in an exciting pursuit of the criminal by land and sea. The action is often of a startling character and will hold attention. It has been very carefully staged in well-chosen or constructed backgrounds. The photography is often in delightful purple-gray tints and is always clear and commendable. There are fine pictures of old buildings, of docks and seashore and of the ocean. But when the hero wins the girl in the end, one wonders whether she were really worthwhile. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Full of convincing action
16 October 2018
A real feature. It is a two-part picture and tells a story in which two Indians have parts; but it is quite out of the ordinary. There is nothing of the trite "Western" about it and, since it is full of convincing action of very sensational nature and handled with restraint by both producer and his players who act in a most natural manner, we commend it as an offering that will very likely awaken enthusiasm. It is an unusually gripping picture and a most desirable release. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Almost tiresomely ordinary
16 October 2018
A foreign spy picture in two parts. The situation is developed in an almost tiresomely ordinary way. Is there no way for a pretty spy to get acquainted with a diplomat or military officer except by pretending to have a fall and a sprained ankle. The second reel is much better and the truth is that the picture ought to have been condensed into one reel. It interests; but it might have been made stronger. The staging, photography and acting are of good quality. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A pretty story
16 October 2018
Alec Francis plays the part of an old cobbler in this number, a man of the Silas Marner type. He sours upon life when his daughter runs away with an artist, but later there is a reconciliation and he again becomes the friend of the neighborhood children. A pretty story, with good settings and a pleasing heart interest. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
The construction is jerky in places
16 October 2018
A typical story of the Great Southwest, with Herbert Rawlinson, Anna Little and Frank Lloyd in the cast. The construction is jerky in places, but the outdoor scenes are attractive. The story concerns the rounding up of Mexican cattle thieves. An average number. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A very good novelty offering
16 October 2018
An illustrated ballad of pirate treasure. The costuming is exceptionally well done, picturing Colonial days to a nicety. The forepart of the story is somewhat jumbled, but it comes to a very diverting finish. This makes a very good novelty offering. The pirates are fearfully and wonderfully made up. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A compelling human interest story
16 October 2018
A compelling human interest story in which a bank robber makes a great personal sacrifice to protect a friend who has helped him is well told in this two-reeler. At times the action is somewhat jerky, but the picture in its entirety is to be highly commended. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
A good deal of false sentiment
16 October 2018
This story, written by Bess Meredyth, concerns the love affairs of a gunman. The characters command no sympathy from the observer and the sacrifice of the gunman's pal seemed to contain a good deal of false sentiment. The scenes are good and well acted, but the type of story is not of a high order. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Quite a pleasing offering
16 October 2018
A pretty story of Indian life, in which two dusky lovers hunt for the arrow shot by the chief, in order to gain the daughter's hand. The story involves love and jealousy, and altogether makes quite a pleasing offering of a somewhat conventional type. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
They possess but little humor
16 October 2018
Bess Meredyth is here featured in a burlesque detective story. The fore part of this contain little action and the plot is very uncertain. The rough and tumble scenes at the close are about the most interesting feature of this, and they possess but little humor. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
This is fairly funny
16 October 2018
Vivian dresses up in men's clothes and fights a burlesque duel with her lover's rival. This is fairly funny and helped considerably by good photography. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
It's a Boy! (1914)
This is not strong
16 October 2018
Little Billy is the chief figure in this film story. When the new baby comes he conspires with a friend to make away with it. They place it in the dog cart and there is an exciting pursuit. This is not strong, but proves quite entertaining. - The Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed