Fyre (2019) Poster

(2019)

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9/10
Of the two, this is the documentary to watch.
MartinHafer25 April 2020
At about the same time "Fyre" was released on Netflix, "Fyre Fraud" was released on Hulu. Both were about the abortive Fyre Festival in the Bahamas...but while "Fyre" was well made and informative, the other film was annoying and badly made....and never really focused all that much on the festival!

"Fyre" does a good job of telling the story. It uses many interviews and clips of the festival's founder as well as folks working on trying to make the event work....even though there really was almost no money nor enough time to adequately run it even if there was money. The story seems complete, fair and didn't spend time making fun of those who bought tickets....which might have been an easy and cheap way to make the film had they gone there. Overall, this is THE film to watch on the subject...the other is just too problematic and poorly made to provide you with much in the way of information.
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8/10
cluster crap
SnoopyStyle6 January 2020
It's a Netflix documentary of the horrible failure of a modern social media tropical island event or a fraudulent scam. Hustler Billy McFarland first started working with Ja Rule on various projects from membership cards to an app to book lesser celebrities. The two starts promoting Fyre festival on a tropical island. Social media buzz from supermodels snowballs into a catastrophe. It's the story of hubris, incompetence, and sociopathy. There is certainly fraud. The question is his intentions. Billy is the classic bs artist and somewhere along the line, he becomes a straight up thief. The funny thing is that I actually got stressed when the attendees start arriving just like the organizers. It's somewhat hilarious and very sad.
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9/10
A fascinating disaster
ComedyFan20101 April 2019
I didn't know much about Fyre. Just read back in 2017 that some festival failed big time and saw lots of people enjoying the fact that rich people were victims of a fraud. Like in many reviews here, the usual hate towards people who have more money than them. "If I can't have it, nobody should". But that was it.

So I was curious to see what it was all about when I saw this documentary on Netflix. And it sure is worth watching, a really fascinating story. The documentary was built very well. We see it all building up towards the disaster and then the footage how it all crashed. It also has people who were part of the crew working on it giving us some inside information.

At the end I feel sorry for all of them except for Billy of course. It is amazing that he still went on with fraud after already being arrested. Wow! This is all I can say about this whole story.
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Fascinating
Gordon-1110 February 2019
This documentary tells the fraud of a music festival that was never going to exist.

The documentary is really well done because you hear from so many people right at the source. The employees and customers recall their accounts which is pretty convincing already. The fact that there was so much footage documenting the planning of the festival makes it even more fascinating, giving an insight into how the huge scam evolves. It is a fascinating documentary.
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7/10
Epic fail
Calicodreamin21 April 2020
Good documentary on the epic fail that was Fyre festival. The interviewees were relevant and provided good insight. The doc was organized and the storyline and a steady flow. The story itself is wild, showing how one person can manipulate people into doing whatever they want, including working for free and paying thousands for an fraudulent experience.
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8/10
a gift to us benchwarmers
ops-5253519 January 2019
This is a story were everybody loose, and its a result from clever use of social media channels, and its a terrific example how the fortunate, the clever,the winners , the richest, the poshest were lured into a masspsychosis of music and festival fever, at a fake island in the paradise-like bahamas.

there are for sure lots of people that never will admit that they went to this gig of a lifetime .and those who were there swashing the subtropical rain,sun, sand and mud, to find barely nothing. no music,no food, no accomodation, no infrastructure and a hard time finding and questioning the management of this emperial scam . it is like genesis sung in the song called'' ripples '', where you land on a muddy pitch in newcastle,were it rains so much,cant wait for a touch of sun and sand:

its not a perfect docu cause the tend to support the loosers are dominant. a documentary shall be informative and most of all objective towards all the parttakers and crucial questions like where were the government agencies , and the police force of bahamas., it could have become a killing scene after all....

festival blunders are common in norway,but it usually strike the investors. but have a look at this film, its a vivid warning sign for the lifes we live these days , fun fex and farty .
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6/10
Fyre reignites the hatred for a certain pathological liar, further fuelling the party fire.
TheMovieDiorama31 July 2019
The Fyre Festival of '17. An idyllic vision featuring a plethora of musical talent, luxury villas, golden beaches and raucous parties. It was sold to be the music festival of dreams. Yet, as the dangers of greed and wealth have illustrated in the past, expenditure on celebrities and a proposed luxurious enterprise turned one vision into a logistical nightmare. Fyre was extinguished almost immediately. This slickly edited documentary briskly takes us on a journey from conception to production and the end result of a fraudulent business proposition that would go down as one of the worst festivals of all time.

Comprising of interrogation-like interviews with many key members within the marketing, development and production teams of Fyre Media, Smith's documentary is as basic as it can get it in terms of structure. The tension gradually increasing with each passing day, slowly allowing us to realise McFarland's inability to provide the many promises he stated to investors. Only to then unleash the agony built within the festival's guests upon the first and only day of partying when it was immediately cancelled. Probably due to those "luxury" cheese sandwiches and "luxury" tents with gaping holes in them. The baffling lack of basic commodities and accommodation was certainly an eye-opener for McFarland, who expended millions upon millions to which he hadn't even acquired yet. Coercing everyone to believe in his fantastical, yet hugely unrealistic, ambition.

The bulk of this documentary comprises of the festival's logistics and McFarland's peers targeting him for the fraudster that he is. Appropriate? Yes, especially for the uninitiated. Underdeveloped? Absolutely. The pacing is too brisk, leaping over the more important ramifications that the festival caused. The misuse of celebrity influencing and the unpaid local workers should've been at the forefront, using the festival to branch out into socioeconomic challenges that are inherent issues in the modern world right now. Primarily feeling sympathy for the team involved isn't enough to make this documentary thought-provoking or enlightening. Especially if they themselves are acquiring monetary gains from the release of this documentary. Also, the use of the score found in 'Gone Girl' irked me. It didn't suit the footage being shown, and instead distracted myself from the core moral of this failed business opportunity.

Still, from someone who knew a minor amount of details regarding Fyre Festival, it was certainly a brisk eye-opener into the mind of a pathological deceiver and a celebration of the justice system. If only Smith focused on the bigger picture, it could've been longer lasting after the credits rolled. Deleting comments though, that's low...
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7/10
Better Than a Cheese Sandwich
matthewssilverhammer9 March 2019
As much as being about the failed festival, it's also about the unwieldy power of social media, which single-handedly created and destroyed this whole thing. But for those of us who take comfort in planning out events thoroughly, this is, quite simply, bone-chilling.
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1/10
Lowest of the Low
arfdawg-123 January 2019
These peopel and this generation and the people who feed them are the lowets scum of all the scum on Earth.

They all look and sound the same and the bottom line is they all want kid's money.

Including the clowns who made this garbage. It's a boring movie for slackers who deserve what they got.
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8/10
Schadenfreude, and I have no problem admitting it
Agent1019 September 2021
There is a darkness in my soul, and it definitely has a soft spot for watching rich jerks and losers get some comeuppance. When I first heard about this festival back in 2017, I just thought this to myself. "You're gonna go to a festival being promoted by influencers, a third tier rapper and a paunchy looking loser with a very punchable face who sells "lifestyles" and parties?" How could this not fail?

I loved the misery these pampered millennials went through, suddenly realizing the grift they fell into that is influencer currency was about as useful as Monopoly money on Mars. I loved the moment their douchey smiles were wiped off their faces to realize they had to live like the "poors" and they deserved every bit of their punishment. Call me a sad petty man.... I don't care. Being from a poor background and barely being considered middle class these days makes me realize one thing. Those who have money are certainly dumb....and separating them from their cash is much easier than expected. Billy McFarland knew this, and even in the third act of the film he still found idiots to buy into his grift. Unfortunately, this fat sack of nonsense will be back because one thing vacuous people will continue to desire is vacuous and empty fulfillment in online capital.

I will admit, I feel incredibly bad for the islanders. Having worked in 100-degree heat for much of my life would leave me really pissed off if I was not paid for hard work. Frankly, the organizers were lucky they got away with their lives because the one and only time I did not get paid for my outdoor electrical work...I ripped out the electrical panel and left a very nice house without power. I knew the guy that replaced the panel (for double the cost mind you) and they were without power for nearly two weeks in 100+ degree weather. I'm glad the restaurant owner was able to get some money from very generous people online. Too bad the perpetrator never will do the same for her.

I will say this and I don't care for your dislikes...if this kind of life and behavior is something you want and you are okay with this type of money making..get a life. If you follow influencers....please, really get a stinking life. And if you want to be like Billy McFarland and Ja Rule....get a soul.
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Up shilling of this film on voting here is just too ironic considering it is about social media manipulation
random-7077818 January 2019
Firstly, after watching both "Fyre" (Netflix) and "Fyre Fraud" (Hulu), both dropped on the same day, is have to say the Netflix version is marginally better.

Both are ultimately shallow experiences, and suffer though from the same problem. They themselves, like the festival, rely on baiting, cult of celebrity, and neither have any meat to them or contextualization of what is classic Ponzi, fed in this case, by social media manipulation. Ultimately both documentaries are as vapid as these seller *and buyers* of Frye illusion. Ponzi, like all cons, relies on the victims' greed, and not enough time is spent on just how unsympathetic those who bought in were as well. To be sure the prime organizers deserved to be in prison, but many of the "duped' "influencers" continued to message for their own self interest creating more victims, just as a classic Ponzi relies on initial victims then victimizing a boarding base. Really just how sympathetic is a vapid but duped influencer-model who knowingly dupes more people?

Lastly I find it funny that as I am typing this this film is more than half half "10" scores in voting, and all the "10s" are from single use accounts-- all created to upvote this film. The irony of PR companies for a film about social media manipulation -- manipulating IMDB scores striking!
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A cautionary tale
DVD_Connoisseur28 January 2019
"Fyre" is a reminder that when something looks too good to be true, it usually is.

Uncomfortable viewing, this is like watching a car crash in slow motion. You know what the outcome is going to be but the events leading up to the big bang are painfully evident.

This is a cautionary tale for those who believe everything that social media portrays via the glowing window of their iPhone.

8 out of 10.
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8/10
Interesting and well made documentary
elliotjeory9 February 2019
If you are interested in the story of the Fyre festival this is a great documentary to give you an insight into the whole story. Production and interviews were very insightful and you learn a lot about the people behind the festival. One of the better Netflix documentaries.
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9/10
A mirror for our times
blumdeluxe6 May 2019
Warning: Spoilers
"Fyre" is a documentary dealing with the catastrohically failed Fyre Festival, that promised an exclusive island party for influencers and the rich and famous and ended in a desaster when the organization of the festival crashed and left many unhappy customers and workers.

The film shows quite understandably how a mixture of failed self-conciousness and a lack of realism and planning slowly led to a result that was rather predictable for many people during the process. It shows what huge amounts of money can be raised with close to nothing but an idea and a marketing campaign. It also shows how people are ready and willing to pay exorbitant prices only to make sure they don't miss out on something eventually. In a way it paints the picture of a society that is so focussed on the looks that it forgets to check what's actually behind it.

All in all this is a well produced documentary that tries to be very detailed and lets many people give their opinion and experiences. It is an extraordinary story and thus thrilling to watch yet sometimes hard to believe that so much lack of planning was actually taking place.
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8/10
Fyre (2019)
rockman18221 January 2019
I think most of us that are up to date on trendy media news heard about this disastrous festival that "took place" in 2017. Was especially looking forward to this film. I did see Hulu's documentary on the same festival which was oddly released during the same week. The Hulu documentary is decent, but I think this one on Netflix covers the matter in a more stronger manner. I thoroughly enjoyed this documentary. Its insane how far this faux festival went all because of social media influencers.

The documentary gives a background of Billy McFarland, an entrepreneur of a brand of credit card called Magnises who comes up with the idea of a luxury musical festival on a serene island in the Bahamas with gourmet food and villas for concert goers. However, the festival was a disaster. There was no money to fund the event, the promotional video was filled with lies. Customers were housed in disaster relief tents that were destroyed from the downpour the day before, there was a severe shortage of toilets, showers. Basically most of what was promised did not take place, and all the musical acts cancelled.

Its a bit comedic. I mean, come on. Rich kids spending an obscene amount of money on a music festival and then having to deal with conditions they did not expect. However, its still a really awful and scary thing that this was able to get to where it did. McFarland has a charming an energetic demeanor but he is a con artist through and through. He can't even explain the extent of the crimes he committed, which you get a grasp of if you watch both documentaries. Also, why in the world would anyone believe Ja Rule in this day and age? My dude spent years in prison for gun charges and tax evasion.

The film shows you the depth of how social media impacts the lives of millennials. All it takes is for popular supermodels to promote an event which they knew nothing about and boom the recipe for a disastrous event occurs. This is a very enjoyable look into the aspects and people involved in the process of people trying to make this impossible festival look and the aftermaths of the disaster.

8/10
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9/10
Millennials meet Darwin and go extinct.
carbuff10 March 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Except for the abused local population, there is absolutely nobody to feel sorry for in this disaster masterpiece. Nobody is sympathetic. Not the fraudster who is at the center of this epic "experience" fail, not the hipsters or overpaid software jockeys or management idiots working for him, not the mindless "influencers" who played the pipe for the rats (let's be real, Kylie Jenner, the youngest "self-made" billionaire in history according to Forbes magazine, has fewer functioning neurons than a nemotode), and, last, but not least, the spoiled rich "kids" who competed to board this notably self-indulgent Titanic. They all basically suck. But it's still a great deal of fun to watch them all slowly get trapped in quicksand of their own making. It's schadenfreude, and I know it, but so be it. As one snide commentator basically puts it, "Darwinism at it's finest." "Fyre" is like watching a roadside accident without any need to even a pang of guilt. Highly recommended.
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8/10
Your Fyred
juliankennedy2325 January 2019
Fyre: 8 out of 10 and Fyre Fraud: 8 out of 10: Two documentaries covering the now infamous Fyre Festival in the Bahamas. Both documentaries consist of plenty of talking heads, promotional footage, behind the scenes footage, and footage from the festival site itself.

On to the questions

So which documentary is better? I gave both documentaries the same score. Both are excellent in their own way and both take a somewhat different look at the events. If I had to choose I would pick the Hulu doc Fyre Fraud.

Why would you pick that documentary? Aren't those are the people that gave money to fraudster Billy McFarland for an interview?: Yes, they are and honestly, they wasted their money. These interview bits are the weakest part of the documentary. What Fyre Fraud does well is it really breaks down Billy's fraud in a way Netflix doesn't. There is a very solid report on his previous business of a "fake" credit card and his ticket broker Ponzi schemes. (Which is, in reality, is why he is in jail along with lying to investors.). It is also more in-depth with the investors to whom he constantly lied to raise more funds for both the Fyre Festival and other ventures.

In addition, the Fyre fraud seems on more solid ground in regards to its expose of influencers and PR firms. It has been noted by others that Billy's PR firm Jerry Media is one of the producers on the Netflix doc. (Though in all fairness it does not escape completely unscathed there either.)

Does the Netflix Doc Fyre do anything better? Yes. The Netflix doc has much better footage particularly of the festival itself. It also focuses more on the outcome for local Bahamian workers that were not paid. Netflix's Fyre also has better behind the scene footage and appears to have more access in regards to both footage and interviews. It also wins on the most outrageous story about the festival. The whole releasing the water from customs sexual favor thing.

Is there really enough material here for one documentary let alone two? Yes. Heck, there is enough for an additional documentary. While both documentaries cover some familiar ground there is plenty of juicy tangents that neither had time to cover. It is actually really neat to watch both documentaries as it gives one a more three-dimensional view of the proceedings. And, let us be honest, there is enough schadenfreude for a tv series.

So everyone in this is either a ripoff artist or a person deserving to get ripped off? Not exactly. First of all, there are some very highly competent people involved. The folks that put out the promotional campaign video and social media blitz did an incredible job. Sure the actual festival itself looked nothing like the video but selling it out in a few days for a first time festival in a foreign country with Blink 182 as a headliner is amazing. That is some Ice selling to Eskimos right there. In addition, the actual application the Fyre festival was meant to promote was, at the very least a good idea. An app that allows private parties to easily search and book available entertainment for the company Christmas party or juniors bar mitzvah certainly is a useful tool. (Many people, including many of the principals of the Fyre company, do forget that the festival was simply supposed to be a marketing event for the app, not a business in and of itself.)

So what is your takeaway? Music festivals are awful. Full stop. There is a reason the music festival scene dies every decade only to be reborn the next. They are awful so you have to wait till a new generation of idiots grows up to learn that hard lesson first hand.

I mean even if they were able to pull this off you still just spent $1500 to sleep in a tent on gravel with no air conditioning to listen to Blink 182.

Heck most music festivals, even the ones that manage to have bands show up, are as bad or worse than the Fyre festival. One of the interviewees has been roundly mocked in comparing the troubles Fyre had to Woodstock. He really isn't that much off. I mean food and water ran out in the first day at Woodstock and the army had to airlift supplies. Plus I don't recall the organizers at Woodstock offering fancy tents with air mattresses. Okay fine Woodstock had great music as well as Sha Na Na and it makes a great film and it defined a generation. The interviewee seemed young maybe he meant Woodstock '99.

Both documentaries are great in their own way and both introduce topics, worlds, and trends that are interesting after the documentary has concluded. I would recommend both so you can take in all the Fyre Festival goodness. Now if I can only figure out why I keep calling it the "fry" festival instead of the "fire" festival we will be all good.
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9/10
A Superb Documentary
kjproulx7 February 2019
It takes a lot for a Documentary to grab my attention, simply due to the fact that I prefer fictional stories over something that I can just read a news article about and get as much information as watching a film about it. That being said, the very idea of this true story grabbed my attention immediately. While I would never personally run an event of this scale or really share any real relation to people who do this kind of thing, I felt terrible for nearly everyone involved in this story. This isn't a film that will make you feel good about yourself in any way, but rather expose those who do things without fully comprehending the magnitude of what they are creating. Here's why I believe everyone should check out Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened.

Following Billy (a young entrepreneur) as he recruits big name performers like Ja Rule and worldwide models like Emily Ratajkowski, his big plan is to create the biggest music festival the world has ever seen. Promising flights to the island in the Bahamas that it will be held at and luxurious accommodations, it truly would look like something that's not to be missed for those who could afford to attend. While that all seemed great, the budget they came up with and the gameplay they created, clearly wasn't thought-out enough, because the event itself slowly collapsed and the worst of it happened when the people actually were there to experience it.

This is a story, similar to the documentary Three Identical Strangers, that has to be seen to be believed. From one instance to another, this is a film that exposes the worst side of a business that has plummeted to the ground. Through fraud, false advertising, and a man who really has done nothing but lie to his co-workers and employees, it really was a frustrating and unnerving experience to sit through. I found myself disgusted when viewing what the guests had to go through once they arrived. This truly was one of the worst-planned events in history.

Overall, this is a film that needs to be seen, due to the fact that people ned to know that things like this happen on a daily basis. This is obviously one of the most extreme versions of these stories, which is why it truly can't get much worse than this. Honestly, I think this is the perfect viewing experience for young professionals who wish to make a name for themselves in ways like this. This a film that showcases what can happen when all the wrong decisions are made. I didn't love watching this film, because I was more outraged than engaged, but it's a fantastically made documentary that's worth a look.
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8/10
Really enjoyed this
Marwan-Bob4 September 2019
I Really Enjoyed This Documentary, Watching Thousands of Reach Spoiled Teenagers Get Effed in The ass, Beautiful.
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6/10
Fyre vs Fyre Fraud
TheTruthofItIs6 February 2019
Since the two Fyre Festival investigative documentaries came out within days of each other I'm briefly reviewing both here. Fyre (Netflix) was a decent enough documentary of grand-fraudster Billy McFarland. It presented a fairly chronological accounting of events, ending with the legal consequences of the fraud. Fyre Fraud (Hulu) was less chrono, at least to begin with, and spent much more time describing Billy's childhood, college days, and the genesis of his fraudulent ways. In fact, I found Fyre Fraud to be more informative and entertaining. Fyre (Netflix) showed more of their social marketing photos and videos, but that wasn't as satisfying. Fyre Fraud also did a better job of describing the fraudsters' legal consequences, too, so my recommendation goes to Fyre Fraud (Hulu) if you only want to watch one of them.
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10/10
I love true stories
rdoubleoc29 January 2019
I absolutely love great true stories, and in my opinion, the caliber of this story is on the same level as that of movies/shows like Snowfall and Trust (FX), or Narcos/Narcos Mexico (Netflix), etc.

I'd like to see more stories like this, especially with so much true archive footage.
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6/10
What A Joke
JoelChamp8518 March 2021
When you watch this pretend it's a mockumentary, it's frickin' hilarious. Feel sorry for the workers though, once again white devil does the black man over.
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6/10
Money ego rich kids delusions
roxmewild3 February 2019
I guess not being a social media follower or a rich kid I was unaware of this festival fraud. The whole part of a festival for me is about the camping music and atmosphere such as I have experienced at Glastonbury and other UK music festivals. Hand on heart I can't feel sorry for all the rich kids that got duped specialy after listening to one of them admit to wrecking the large dome like tents and pissing on beds because he didn't want people staying in them near him! However I do feel sorry for the local people who worked hard and not only didn't get paid but also lost their own money in the process I have never heard of Billy McFarland the guy who organised ,lied and in effect stole millions in the process of selling a 5 star music festival experience to the over privalaged and delivering a bag of s***e. The main thing that left me speechless was the sentence that this guy was given,taking into account that whilst on bail he tried to and did sell exclusive tickets to high profile events under another person that were also not genuine ! Apparently this holds a 20 year sentence of which he was given 6 yrs!! WTF so he basically got a slap on the wrist! Wouldn't surprise me if he has a pimped out cell to boot!
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7/10
Simple, insightful, high-quality, well edited and suitably cringey.
Offworld_Colony12 February 2020
Probably no different than if you put on a swimsuit illustrated video side by side with an infographic about Fyre.

Cant help but think there's something missing from the gloss. Maybe some grunge, some real in-fighting and found footage, I get that the tone is meant to mimic the Fyre festival tone, but a gritty expose on social media influencers and the circus that allowed all of this to actually occur, including legal loopholes and corporate interest and the reason why ordinary people and influencers would spend their money on this, could have been more entertaining.
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6/10
An interesting but ultimately surface level examination of what was sold as an exclusive music festival in paradise and ended up as a disaster.
david-meldrum12 April 2019
It feels like there's not much left to say about the Fyre festival debacle, the people behind, and even the two recent documentary films trying to tell the story. A con job that was enabled and bought down by social media , now the subject of short notice films that gain traction through ... you guessed it, social media.

This film - the Netflix production - tells the story through footage shot for the festival organisers from conception through to aftermath. It was, as is explicitly said in the documentary, an attempt not so much to put on a music festival as to sell a dream; an exclusive weekend on an idyllic island with supermodels, stars and social media influencers, staying in luxury accomodation, eating the best food and partying. It fell apart in real time, finally exposed to the world by a viral photo of a cheap cheese sandwich taking the place of the best in catering.

That just about everybody fell under the influence of the charismatic, persuasive Billy McFarland is a matter of public record. Several things become apparent as we watch this film. One is that, to quote Leonard Cohen, the people involved really don't care for music, do they? As quoted above, they didn't care about the music festival; they cared about a buzz of exclusivity, exploiting FOMO, making money by selling an ephemeral dream. That one of the staff involved, interviewed for the film, is wearing a Nirvana t-shirt whilst he talks about the vision of an island paradise makes this point eloquently; the icons of grunge, repackaged as a fashion accessory.

Even as it becomes apparent that the whole thing is a disaster, and the people trying to make it happen are telling the story, they are laughing. Of course, this may be a trick of the director's editing, or it may be the laughter of regret and disbelief; either way, they laugh as they talk about sleeping on soaking mattresses and the disappearance of vast amounts of money. At no point do these people show concern for the real victims - the local islanders, who laboured hard to build and set up for the festival and received no money; the local club owner who tearfully tells us of the extra staff she took on in anticipation and had to pay from her life savings when promised money never materialised. The locals - many of whom are poor - will never be paid back. Billy McFarland has been convicted, and others too; but what use is that when you've worked for weeks without pay, or shelled money out of our lifetime savings? The rich mostly escape, relatively free; the poor bear the brunt (and this divide is also expressed largely but not exclusively on skin colour lines also). It was ever thus, and it's a failing of the film that it never really gives full voice or the last word to those who suffered most. We get to peak behind the curtain of deception, but the human cost is never really examined.

The problem is that this was a disembodied project from the word go. Relying on the myth of the perfect sun-kissed island and celebrity lifestyle, the myth was sold, and turned out to be nothing but smoke and mirrors. We can blame it all on social media hype; and yes, that was the vehicle used for this con. But it's really a story as old as time; it's always just out of reach, around the next corner, as intangible as it is expensive. No one looks behind the curtain until it's too late; those that do visit the site in advance or raise a warning word are ignored or sacked. It's an attempt to parachute a paradise into the backyard of some real people; and leave them to pick up the pieces afterwards. And when they do pick up the pieces, they find they have even less than they started with; no one to pay them back, no one to sit and weep with them, no one to help them rebuild.

As a Christian, I can criticise this - and I do. But that's a dangerous road; how many megachurch or rich foreign, usually white-skinned missionaries have parachuted in to poorer places promising revival and renewal, not sticking around after to remake what they have broken - or to use the language of the moment, 'disrupted'? It seems it's in our nature, all of us, to keep our poor and our mistakes as equally out of our site as each other. Embodiment, incarnation, long-term rooting in the one place; such is the way to which we are called.
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