7.9/10
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210 user 274 critic

Shoplifters (2018)

Manbiki kazoku (original title)
Trailer
1:42 | Trailer
A family of small-time crooks take in a child they find outside in the cold.

Director:

Hirokazu Koreeda (as Kore-eda Hirokazu)

Writers:

Hirokazu Koreeda (original story), Hirokazu Koreeda (screenplay)
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Popularity
2,884 ( 225)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 51 wins & 97 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lily Franky ... Osamu Shibata
Sakura Andô ... Nobuyo Shibata
Kirin Kiki ... Hatsue Shibata
Mayu Matsuoka ... Aki Shibata
Jyo Kairi ... Shota Shibata
Miyu Sasaki ... Yuri Hojo
Sôsuke Ikematsu ... 4 ban-san
Yûki Yamada Yûki Yamada ... Yasu Hojo
Moemi Katayama Moemi Katayama ... Nozomi Hojo
Daisuke Kuroda Daisuke Kuroda
Kazuaki Shimizu Kazuaki Shimizu
Izumi Matsuoka Izumi Matsuoka
Katsuya Maiguma Katsuya Maiguma
Hajime Inoue Hajime Inoue
Aju Makita Aju Makita
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Storyline

A Japanese couple stuck with part-time jobs and hence inadequate incomes avail themselves of the fruits of shoplifting to make ends meet. They are not alone in this behaviour. The younger and the older of the household are in on the act. The unusual routine is about to change from care-free and matter-of-fact to something more dramatic, however, as the couple open their doors to a beleaguered young girl. The reasons for the family's habit and their motivations come under the microscope. Written by aghaemi

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Sometimes you choose your family.

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexual content and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film premiered on 13 May 2018 at the Cannes Film Festival, where it went on to win the Palme d'Or. Shoplifters won the Asia Pacific Screen Award for Best Feature Film, and is nominated for both the Golden Globe and the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. See more »

Quotes

Nobuyo Shibata: Sometimes it's better to choose your own family.
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Connections

Featured in The Oscars (2019) See more »

User Reviews

 
multi-generational poverty
4 January 2019 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. We typically think of family as blood relatives, those affiliated by marriage or adoption, and those funky cousins (sometimes 'removed') that, according to the family tree, are supposedly related to us. Expert Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda (LIKE FATHER LIKE SON, 2013) presents a story that will have you questioning whether the strongest connection is blood, heart, or money.

We first witness 'father' Osamu Shibata (played by Lily Franky) and adolescent 'son' Shota (Jyo Kairi) in a well-coordinated shoplifting maneuver at the local grocery store. On the way home they stumble across a shivering child, maybe 4 or 5 years old, who has been seemingly abandoned by her parents. They take her home to warm her up and feed her, and it's here we discover the multi-generational family living in a tiny apartment. This family also consists of 'grandmother' Hatsue (an excellent Kirin Kiki), 'mother/wife' Nobuyo (Sakura Ando), and teenage daughter Aki (rising star Mayu Matsuoka).

When the family discovers signs of abuse on the little girl Yuri (Miyu Sasaki), they decide to keep her - less an informal adoption than an admission to the club. See, this family lives in poverty, and finds comfort in working odd jobs and shoplifting. They do bad things out of necessity, in a kind of twisted 'honor among thieves'. Each person, regardless of age is expected to contribute to the team. The eldest provides a steady income through her deceased ex-husband's pension, and by scamming mercy money from his second family. Osamu and Nobuyo have regular part time jobs, while Aki works in a sexy chat room. Shota polishes his shoplifting skills and even tiny Yuri begins to learn by watching him. Everyone contributes in what can be described as a pyramid scheme of petty cons.

As the film progresses, we get to know each of the characters and begin to care about them ... rooting for them to find success. Writer-Director Kore-eda draws us in with subtle scenes of interaction between the characters, each willing to sacrifice for the other. He raises the question on whether choosing one's family might create a stronger bond than those blood ties. What really seems to matter is where we feel we belong, and where are accepted.

The film won the Palme d'Or at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, and it's likely due to the devastating and expert final act. In a dramatic shift in tone, true character is revealed - it's a shocking revelation on some fronts, and fully expected on others. Each family member has a backstory that slowly unfolds through the first two acts, and then abruptly slaps us upside the head as the film nears conclusion. There are many social aspects to be discussed after this one, including how the child welfare system (seemingly regardless of country) sometimes works against a child's best interest, even with the best intentions. This is one that will grab your heart and then stick with you for a while.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

23 November 2018 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Shoplifters See more »

Filming Locations:

Japan See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$89,264, 25 November 2018

Gross USA:

$3,313,513

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$67,999,335
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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