Teacher (2019) Poster

(2019)

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7/10
revenge isnt always the best but sometimes the sweetest
ops-5253513 August 2019
When reading a short summary of ''teacher'' my first thought where, this must be like ''class of 1984'' or some real bully towards nerds + protective teacher= bloody revenge..... well it became some thing like that but not so much.

what i can say though is that the main actor does a good job on the screen, and that the plot had a good float and the score made it all pretty tense. also some of the bullying where rather maliscious and even though often used as a teenage drama topic it engaged me that much that i started talking to the screen and jolting at the takes.

its actually a good film thinks the grumpy old man, the only thing missing is the bloody revenge
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6/10
grab bag of social issues
ferguson-614 August 2019
Greetings again from the darkness. The first feature film from writer-director Adam Dick is actually a full length version of his own short film (same title) from a couple of years ago. In it, he covers many of today's hot topics: bullying, racism, white privilege, and gun control. No one can argue against any film that takes on these issues, and the filmmaker gets many things right in this low budget presentation.

David Dastmalchian (whose crazed eyes we first noticed in THE DARK KNIGHT, 2008) stars as James Lewis, a devoted English teacher who cares about students despite his own personal issues. Those issues include a rough divorce, anger issues, alcoholism, and a less-than-ideal childhood. Having been bullied himself as a youngster, he recognizes what his mirror image student is going through. Preston (Matthew Garry) is a shy, sensitive, intelligent student who has a knack for photography. Preston is also the target of school bully Tim Cooper (a talented Curtis Edward Jackson), a star athlete and son of powerful local community businessman Bernard Cooper (the always excellent Kevin Pollack). When Preston befriends Daniela (Esme Perez), she also becomes a target - this time of cruel cyberbullying.

During Lewis' class, Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" provides literary symmetry to the student experience, especially when the focus is on Shylock. This is the most creative portion of the film, and it's a film that does a pretty nice job of capturing the helplessness of meek students, as well as the lack of power a school official often has in such situations. The film and characters are at their best in those moments of fear, frustration and desperation.

What doesn't work so well is Mr. Lewis as a vigilante. At that point, it feels like a fantasy solution to a real world problem. Still, there are enough solid points and performances to keep us mostly engaged ... especially when Kevin Pollack (he's worked consistently and quite well since the mid-1980's) spews forth with privileged rich guy righteousness. Sure, it's all a bit obvious and over-the-top, but there is some underlying truth here as well.
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Near Miss of a Film Includes Poignant Moments
lavatch17 August 2019
Warning: Spoilers
The problem with "Teacher" is that the filmmakers could never make up their mind how to approach the serious topic of bullying. Was this primarily a social drama? Was it dark comedy? Was it a horror picture? Was it a revenge/action picture? The film combined genres into a mishmash of cinematic forms.

The strength of the film was in the interesting set of characters and the attempt to expose bullying, especially for young people at home and in school. The film was successful in portraying the life-damaging consequences of bullying.

We saw this theme unfold through the lens of the protagonist, the English teacher James Lewis. We watch him try to get students to grapple with the question of victimhood in their study of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice." Like Shylock in the play, Lewis feels that he is an outsider to his world after his own history of abuse at home and at school. Now, in a leadership role, Lewis finds himself in the position to do something about stemming the abuse that he witnesses in his classroom.

Sadly, Lewis was not a very likable character himself, based upon his strange behavior and the inept way that he seeks to help the young couple of Preston and Daniela. The film's ending takes a bizarre and head-scratching turn with Lewis turning the film into a kind of "Death Wish" revenge saga.

The filmmakers deserve credit for raising consciousness about bullying. While it may not be endemic in society to the degree that it is depicted in the film, it is important to understand how any form of bullying may result in a lifetime of damage to a fragile psyche.

One of the best scenes in the film was the confessional of Arabella, who opened up to Lewis about her own history of abuse. Lewis's callous response was surprising, given his own passivity in the face of abuse. He should have responded to her with compassion. Instead, he berated her, she left the bar, and never reappeared in the film. It was in the poor handling of moments like this one that the film let its audience down.
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5/10
slow
incredingo-3776915 August 2019
The story line was very good. explored a few social issues very well. however i found the movie drawn out, slow and the acting was very weak. if you can overlook the poor acting then it is worth a watch.
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