On 22 July 2011, Anders Breivik bombed government buildings in Oslo, resulting in eight deaths. He then arrived at Utøya island, the site of a camp for Worker's Youth League, posing as a police officer killing 69 people.

Director:

Svein Bæren

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Storyline

Norway is a small country. It is also relatively homogeneous and egalitarian. This means that the distance from top to bottom is short, and that great disasters affect the entire populace. It was out of this world that the thirty-two-year-old Anders Behring Breivik stepped when, on the afternoon of July 22, 2011, he set out from his mother's flat in Oslo's West End, changed into a police uniform, parked a van containing a bomb, which he had spent the spring and summer making, outside the governments buildings, lit the fuse, and left the scene. While the catastrophic images of the attack, which killed eight people, were being broadcast across the world, Breivik headed to Utøya. That was where the Workers' Youth League had its annual summer camp. There Breivik shot and killed sixty-nine people, in a massacre that lasted for more than an hour, right until the police arrived, when he immediately surrendered. Written by Ulf Kjell Gür

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Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Official Sites:

NRK

Country:

Norway

Language:

Norwegian

Release Date:

27 November 2012 (Norway) See more »

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Trivia

22.07 Pop-up Exhibition in central Oslo 2015. Objects used by mass killer Anders Behring Breivik, including the van that concealed a bomb, have gone on show in Norway amid fears the exhibition could attract sympathizers. The display in Oslo opened four years to the day after Breivik killed 77 people in a bloody rampage. Officials says it aims to help Norway come to terms with the terror attacks. But experts and some relatives of the victims have warned it could become a magnet for right-wing extremists. Concern has focused on the inclusion of some personal items belonging to the killer, including a fake police identity card. Last week, Tor Oestboe, whose wife was among those killed, said he feared the exhibition would provide a "hall of fame" for the mass murderer. See more »

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