Menashe (2017) - News Poster

(2017)

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Forbidden Romance ‘Disobedience’ Soars at Specialty Box Office

Forbidden Romance ‘Disobedience’ Soars at Specialty Box Office
Thanks to two stars named Rachel — Weisz and McAdams — “Disobedience” led a batch of new films from arthouse auteurs this weekend. This story of forbidden love in a London synagogue setting, like director Sebastián Lelio’s Oscar-winning “A Fantastic Woman,” deals with gay characters fighting for their right to love despite societal taboos. It doubles the opening numbers of any film from Bleecker Street.

Claire Denis’ “Let the Sunshine In” (IFC) also opened unexpectedly strong in New York. But “Mustang” director Deniz Gamze Erguven’s English-language debut “Kings,” and “Duck Butter,” Miguel Arteta’s follow-up to “Beatriz at Dinner,” saw much less impact.

Among holdovers, “Isle of Dogs” (Fox Searchlight) is wrapping up its national run as it heads to a decent $30 million total. “Disobedience” shows the need for fresh titles to feed the hungry specialized audience.

Opening

Disobedience (Bleecker Street) Metacritic: 73; Festivals include: Toronto 2017, Tribeca 2018

$241,276 in 5 theaters; PTA (per
See full article at Indiewire »

“Call Me By Your Name” vs “Get Out” vs “Lady Bird”: Final Independent Spirit Award predictions

On Saturday, the final show before the Oscars will go down, which of course will be the Film Independent Spirit Awards. Long the hipper compliment to the Academy Awards, this is the last stop before the season officially ends on Sunday night. Despite the presence of many Oscar nominees in the lineup, this can have no impact on the race, obviously. Voting wrapped up yesterday, so ballots are in. The Spirit Awards simply represent a fun way to wind down the season. They’re often my favorite non Academy event of each year, so they’re well worth keeping an eye on just on their own merit. Of course, below you will see what I think the Spirit Awards will look like this weekend, but first a bit of commentary. Again, by and large it looks like a major competition between Call Me By Your Name, The Florida Project, Get Out,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Kyle Kohner’s Top 20 Films Of 2017

While it’s been a rough 2017 overall, It’s been a phenomenal year in film. With that being said, below is a list ranking what I believe are the top 20 films of 2017. It was painstakingly difficult cutting my list of 100 to 50, but even harder from 50 to 20. Some notable films that barely missed the cut include: “Wakefield,” “The Lovers,” “Wonder Woman,” “Baby Driver,” “Super Dark Times,” “It,” “Split,” “Personal Shopper,” “Columbus,” “Menashe” “and yes, I left out the fan favorite, “Dunkirk.” I also want to mention that there are films that I have excluded because I have yet to see them, such as: “Phantom Thread,” “The Darkest Hour,” “Bpm,” and “Molly’s Game” just to name a few.

Continue reading Kyle Kohner’s Top 20 Films Of 2017 at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Menashe movie review: the unhappy nonconformist

MaryAnn’s quick take… A bittersweet, deeply human tale, one with a documentary sense of discovery to its setting: a little seen, highly insular ultraorthodox Jewish community. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

There’s a word in Yiddish to describe the sadsack widower at the center of Menashe: schlemiel. A schlemiel isn’t a bad person, but merely one who’s clumsy, inept, a bit of a slob. (No one says the word here, but you can almost see them thinking it in their rolled eyes and their just barely contained polite tolerance for his oafish antics.) It makes the task of winning back custody of his son, nine-year-old Rieven (Ruben Niborsk), much trickier for grocery-store worker Menashe (Menashe Lustig). His ultraorthodox Jewish rabbi (Meyer Schwartz) insists that Menashe remarry before he can
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Menashe review – intensely emotional tale of a widower's grief

A Yiddish drama set in a Hasidic Jewish community unpicks patriarchal power politics with a powerful central turn from non-professional Menashe Lustig

Menashe is a deeply felt and absorbing Yiddish-language drama about New York Hasidic Jews. Director Joshua Weinstein expertly seals you in a self-enclosed world whose drama, but for a few plot points concerning an elderly mobile phone, could as well be happening 50 or 100 years ago.

Menashe (played by non-professional Menashe Lustig) is an overweight, shambling widower who works in a convenience store and who has clearly let himself go, though he may not have been all that svelte and presentable in the first place. According to religious rules enforced by the rabbi, Menashe’s young son may not live with him until Menashe remarries; the boy has to stay with his late wife’s disapproving, controlling brother who takes a dim view of Menashe’s chaotic lifestyle and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

World of difference by Amber Wilkinson

Menashe Lustig in the film Alex Lipschultz: 'We definitely had conversations with Menashe and other performers in the film about if there would be or could be serious repercussions for them about being in this movie and what those might be and if they were really prepared for that, should it come' Menashe – which premiered at Sundance in January – finally makes it to UK cinema screens this week. The film, sees documentarian and cinematographer Josh Z Weinstein turn his hand to fictional direction, although the story is firmly rooted in truth. Co-written with Alex Lipschultz and Musa Syeed, the story draws heavily on the real life of its Hasidic Jewish star Menashe Lustig. He plays the character of the same name who, following the death of his wife, begins to fight within the community to retain custody of his son, who rules dictate must live with his brother-in-law until he remarries.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘The Florida Project,’ ‘The Rider’ Nominated for Cinema Eye Honors (Exclusive)

  • The Wrap
‘The Florida Project,’ ‘The Rider’ Nominated for Cinema Eye Honors (Exclusive)
Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project,” Joshua Z. Weinstein’s “Menashe” and Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider” are nominated for the Cinema Eye Honors Heterodox Award, which goes to films that blur the line between narrative fiction and documentary filmmaking. Guido Hendrikx’s “Stranger in Paradise” and Pawel Lozinski’s “You Have No Idea How Much I Love You” were also nominated for the award. Previous winners include “Boyhood,” “Taxi,” “Beginners,” “All These Sleepless Nights” and “Post Tenebras Lux,” among others. At the same time, the Cinema Eye Honors, which were established in 2007 to honor all facets of non-fiction filmmaking,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘There’s enough rabbis – now God wants some actors’: how Menashe put Hasidic New York on screen

A film based on the real life story of its lead, a non-actor from Brooklyn, as he fights to keep his son after his wife’s death has connected with festival audiences and critics alike

As a tiny film about a hapless Hasidic Jew, starring non-actors speaking almost entirely in Yiddish, hopes for Menashe’s reception were modest, to say the least. Yet it has connected with festival audiences and critics: note-perfect and with a huge heart, it’s a story about a closed community, but one that ripples with resonance. Whatever our culture, it obliquely suggests, we are fundamentally the same. It’s a tonic.

Menashe’s director, Joshua Z Weinstein, a practising non-Orthodox Jew, was raised in suburban New Jersey, but on weekends he would visit his grandparents in Brooklyn and Queens. There, he would catch glimpses of Hasids, stoking his curiosity. He’s primarily a cinematographer, and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Call Me By Your Name and Get Out win big at the 2017 Gotham Awards

The winners of the 2017 Gotham Awards were announced last night, with Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name taking home the top prize of Best Feature, as well as the Breakthrough Actor award for Timothee Chalamet.

It was also a good night for Get Out, which received Breakthrough Director Award (Jordan Peele), Best Screenplay (Jordan Peele) and the Audience Award, while James Franco (The Disaster Artist) and Saoirse Ronan (Lady Bird) were named Best Actor and Best Actress respectively.

Check out a full list of the nominations, with the winners in red…

Best Feature

Call Me By Your Name

Luca Guadagnino, director; Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges, Rodrigo Teixeira, Marco Morabito, James Ivory, Howard Rosenman, producers (Sony Pictures Classics)

The Florida Project

Sean Baker, director; Sean Baker, Chris Bergoch, Kevin Chinoy, Andrew Duncan, Alex Saks, Francesca Silvestri, Shih-Ching Tsou, producers (A24)

Get Out

Jordan Peele, director; Sean McKittrick,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gotham Awards 2017: Complete Winners List

Gotham Awards 2017: Complete Winners List
And we’re off to the races! The Independent Filmmaker Project (Ifp) officially kicked off the 2017-18 awards season with this evening’s 27th Annual Gotham Awards, which took place at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City and were hosted by John Cameron Mitchell.

Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” proved to be the night’s biggest winner, with three wins, including Best Screenplay, the Audience Award, and Breakthrough Director. Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name” proved victorious in the Best Feature category, winning out against a stacked list of competitors. Earlier in the night, star Timothee Chalamet won the Breakthrough Actor award for his star-making turn in the romance.

The ceremony’s nomination list was studded with some of the year’s most beloved indies, including “Get Out,” “Call Me by Your Name,” Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” Kogonada’s “Columbus,” and Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project.
See full article at Indiewire »

Independent Spirit Award nominations announced

Just a few moments ago, the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Award nominations were revealed to the public, continuing on with Phase One of the awards season. This precursor marks another new point in the race, as many of these movies nominated today will be contending for Oscar attention as well. Removed from the Academy Award race though, this is just a great precursor because of what it nominates. The films are small in budget and often need a leg up, so this is a spotlight on what the viewing public should be searching out in theaters and at home on Blu-Ray or VOD. Congrats to the nominees and read on to see who and what they were… You’ll see all of the nominees below, but as you’ll be able to tell, it appears to be a race between Call Me By Your Name, The Florida Project, Get Out, and Lady Bird,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

5 Exciting American Indies Hitting Film Festivals in 2018, From Cowboys in China to WWII-Era Russia

5 Exciting American Indies Hitting Film Festivals in 2018, From Cowboys in China to WWII-Era Russia
Now in its eighth year, the American Film Festival offers a unique perspective on recent developments in U.S. indie filmmaking. That’s because it happens in Poland, staged at the stylish Kino Nowe Horyzonty film center in Wroclaw, also home to the summer New Horizons festival, which has more of a European tilt.

Although the festival, which recently concluded, surveys many favorites from Sundance and South by Southwest, the curation doesn’t merely transpose selections to a new setting. It imports a lively assortment of filmmakers, as well, and creates a cozy, engaged atmosphere more akin to the communal vibe of the Maryland Film Festival. Indeed, to rub shoulders in a crowd that included Jody Lee Lipes, Noel Wells, Dustin Guy Defa, Nathan Silver, producer Mike Ryan, Jessica Oreck and Mike Ott is to experience a deep dive into the creative bustle of current indie ferment.

That spirit is
See full article at Indiewire »

Get Out leads nominations for 2017 Gotham Independent Film Awards

The nominations for the 27th annual Gotham Independent Film Awards have been announced today, with Jordan Peele’s acclaimed directorial feature Get Out leading the pack with nods in four categories – Best Feature, Breakthrough Director (Peele), Best Screenplay (Peele) and Best Actor.

Get Out will contest the Best Feature award against Call Me By Your Name (three nominations in total), The Florida Project (three nominations in total), Good Time (two nominations in total) and I, Tonya (two nominations in total).

Via Deadline, here’s a full list of the nominations…

Best Feature

Call Me By Your Name

Luca Guadagnino, director; Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges, Rodrigo Teixeira, Marco Morabito, James Ivory, Howard Rosenman, producers (Sony Pictures Classics)

The Florida Project

Sean Baker, director; Sean Baker, Chris Bergoch, Kevin Chinoy, Andrew Duncan, Alex Saks, Francesca Silvestri, Shih-Ching Tsou, producers (A24)

Get Out

Jordan Peele, director; Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Edward H.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Get Out,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘The Florida Project’ & More Lead 2017 Gotham Award Nominations

Despite the insanity of announcing year-end award nominations with still well over two months to go in 2017, we have to give it to the annual Ifp Gotham Awards for being more on-point than most trophy ceremonies this season.

They’ve now unveiled the nominations for their 27th edition and leading the pack is Jordan Peele’s social thriller Get Out. Also among the stellar group of Best Feature nominations are Call Me by Your Name, The Florida Project, I, Tonya, and Good Time.

Check out the full list of nominations below, including Columbus, Ex Libris, Rat Film, Lady Bird, Marjorie Prime, and more of the best films of the year. If The Academy takes just a few notes from this group come next year, we’ll be mightily pleased.

Best Feature

Call Me by Your Name

The Florida Project

Get Out

Good Time

I, Tonya

Best Documentary

Ex Libris – The
See full article at The Film Stage »

2017 Gotham Awards Nominations: ‘Get Out’ Leads Pack, ‘Lady Bird’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Also Break Out

2017 Gotham Awards Nominations: ‘Get Out’ Leads Pack, ‘Lady Bird’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Also Break Out
Consider awards season officially started. The Independent Filmmaker Project (Ifp), the nation’s premier member organization of independent storytellers, has announced the nominees for its 27th Annual Ifp Gotham Awards. For 2017, ten competitive awards will be presented to independent features and series.

This year’s nominees are lead by Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” which pulled in four nominations (including Best Feature, Breakthrough Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Actor), but the breakout debut is trailed by four other hot contenders, each with three nominations to their name. Those include Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name,” Kogonada’s “Columbus,” and Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project.”

The Gothams also heaped nomination glory on other films that are expected to contend this season, including Craig Gillespie’ “I, Tonya,” the Safdie brothers’ “Good Time,” and Dee Rees’ “Mudbound,” which will be receiving a special ensemble awards.
See full article at Indiewire »

'Girls Trip' Now Available for Rent, Plus This Week's New Digital HD and VOD Releases

Our resident VOD expert tells you what's new to rent and/or own this week via various Digital HD providers such as cable Movies On Demand, Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, Google Play and, of course, Netflix. Cable Movies On Demand: Same-day-as-disc releases, older titles and pretheatrical Spider-Man: Homecoming (umpteenth superhero-franchise reboot; Tom Holland, Zendaya, Michael Keaton, Bokeem Woodbine, Tyne Daly, Marisa Tomei, Robert Downey Jr.; rated PG-13) Girls Trip (comedy; Regina Hall, Tiffany Haddish, Larenz Tate, Mike Colter, Kate Walsh, Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah; rated R) Lady Macbeth (romantic drama; Florence Pugh, Cosmo Jarvis; rated R) Menashe (drama; Menashe Lustig, Ruben Niborski; rated PG) Step (documentary about an inner-city Baltimore dance team...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

New to Streaming: ‘Brawl in Cell Block 99,’ ‘The Meyerowitz Stories,’ ‘War for the Planet of the Apes,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

78/52 (Alexandre Philippe)

There’s been documentaries that analyze entire cinematic movements, directors, actors, writers, specific films, and more aspects of filmmaking, but it’s rare to see a feature film devoted to a single scene. With 78/52, if the clunky title addition didn’t tell you already, it explores the infamous shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho with exacting precision and depth. Featuring interviews with Jamie Lee Curtis, Guillermo del Toro,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Foreign Film Upheaval: Why Esoteric Cultures Outpace European Mainstays at the Box Office

  • Indiewire
Foreign Film Upheaval: Why Esoteric Cultures Outpace European Mainstays at the Box Office
In 2017, we’ve seen five specialized subtitled films gross over $1 million. But the languages aren’t French, or German, or from anywhere in western Europe: The winners are Turkish, Farsi, Yiddish, and Hebrew.

These films came from Turkey, Iran, Israel, and even the United States, and played at conventional “art house” theaters (as opposed to releases from India, China, Mexico, and elsewhere, which aim at ethnically similar audiences).

Once upon a time, $100 million and more (in adjusted grosses) was possible for films like “La Dolce Vita,” “Life Is Beautiful,” and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”: more recently, “Amelie,” “Pan’s Labyrinth,” and “The Motorcycle Diaries” easily surpassed $20 million. However, over the last few decades we’ve seen the subtitled market shift from decline to near collapse.

Read More:Why French Cinema Faces an Uncertain Future in America

What happened this year shows some revival in the market, but with some twists.
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Menashe, A Religious Experience Unto Itself

What kind of man is Menashe? A valid question, considering his own initial apparent fluidity on the rigidity of his own cultural rules and restrictions. In a deeply sensitive portrayal by the talented Menashe Lustig in his debut role, the film tells the story of a down-on-his-luck widower who’s bucking the rules of his devoutly Hasidic Jewish culture in his efforts to retain custody of his adolescent son. The arbitrators of his insular modern-day community, nestled in the beating heart of New York City, have deemed him an incapable father, an unmotivated nonstarter, and a directionless slob. Never mind that he only wants to raise his son… What if they're right?? Also, there are rules. Including a big rule, stating that a child must be...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Menashe – Review

As the Summer season winds down, a new independent flick enters the box office arena concerning the challenges of single parenting. Oh, and this is from a male viewpoint, but it’s not a heart-tugging comedy that will make moviegoers recall The Courtship Of Eddie’S Father (the flick with Glenn Ford or the TV version with Bill Bixby), which helped inspire several sitcoms like “Bachelor Father” and “My Three Sons”. Yes, it’s about a widower, thought its main concern isn’t the search for a new mate (it does factor in a bit). The film is set in New York, but its language gives the story a decided foreign feel. Most of the dialogue (about 95%) is in Yiddish, as the world of Brooklyn’s ultra-orthodox Jewish community is the home of a man (well, almost a Mensch) named Menashe.

The story begins in the bustling early morning hours
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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