A cover-up spanning four U.S. Presidents pushes the country's first female newspaper publisher and her editor to join an unprecedented battle between press and government.

Director:

Steven Spielberg
Reviews
Popularity
1,174 ( 332)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 20 wins & 111 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Meryl Streep ... Kay Graham
Tom Hanks ... Ben Bradlee
Sarah Paulson ... Tony Bradlee
Bob Odenkirk ... Ben Bagdikian
Tracy Letts ... Fritz Beebe
Bradley Whitford ... Arthur Parsons
Bruce Greenwood ... Robert McNamara
Matthew Rhys ... Daniel Ellsberg
Alison Brie ... Lally Graham
Carrie Coon ... Meg Greenfield
Jesse Plemons ... Roger Clark
David Cross ... Howard Simons
Zach Woods ... Anthony Essaye
Pat Healy ... Phil Geyelin
John Rue ... Gene Patterson
Edit

Storyline

When American military analyst, Daniel Ellsberg, realizes to his disgust the depths of the US government's deceptions about the futility of the Vietnam War, he takes action by copying top-secret documents that would become the Pentagon Papers. Later, Washington Post owner, Kay Graham, is still adjusting to taking over her late husband's business when editor Ben Bradlee discovers the New York Times has scooped them with an explosive expose on those papers. Determined to compete, Post reporters find Ellsberg himself and a complete copy of those papers. However, the Post's plans to publish their findings are put in jeopardy with a Federal restraining order that could get them all indicted for Contempt. Now, Kay Graham must decide whether to back down for the safety of her paper or publish and fight for the Freedom of the Press. In doing so, Graham and her staff join a fight that would have America's democratic ideals in the balance. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Truth be told

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for language and brief war violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Ben Bradlee and Richard Nixon were distantly related to each other. Both were descendants of the same English Baldwin Family. See more »

Goofs

The informational card under the dial of the payphone used by Ben Bagdikian to call Ellsberg includes instructions on using a calling card to make a phone call. Calling card technology did not exist until the mid-1970s, and did not gain widespread use until years later. See more »

Quotes

Daniel Ellsberg: The study had 47 volumes. I slipped out a couple at a time. It took me months to copy it all.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The DVD opens with the standard credits from the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security warning against pirating home video recordings and stating "Piracy is not a victimless crime," but the whole movie is about an individual who steals intellectual property and is presented as a hero for doing so. See more »


Soundtracks

Oh Harry
(from Night and the City (1950))
Written by Franz Waxman
Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
See more »

User Reviews

 
Solid, Important Historical Drama
25 January 2018 | by Jared_AndrewsSee all my reviews

Is it cliché to call this movie an Oscar cliché?

Even if the answer is yes, that's The Post, in a nutshell. It hits all the right beats. Serious historical drama (it covers a newspaper contemplating printing government lies about the Vietnam War), mega-famous director (Spielberg), and beloved, award-winning stars (Streep and Hanks). To top it all off, this movie is timely. A movie about newspaper courage at a time when our nation's free press is under attack, it's almost too perfect. Delicately arrange all these ingredients nicely on a fancy dish, and we should have a five-star meal. But we do not. Instead, the result is something that is just fine. It's a lower-middle class version of Spotlight.

That likely reads harsher than I intend it. Spotlight is incredible. Mentioning any movie in the same breath is an honor. The Post is a perfectly adequate, important movie, not a Best Picture winner. There's no shame in that.

There's very little blatantly wrong with the movie. Grading via a high school-style rubric would result in an A for following all the instructions and including all the required criteria. Yet, it does not quite reach the level of "WOW."

Figuring out why it doesn't "WOW" is tricky. Maybe shooting and editing a movie that quickly (reportedly completed in only a few months) is too tall a task even for a master like Spielberg.

Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep play the leading roles and do so fantastically. Streep is especially strong in capturing the hesitancy of a woman in charge who doesn't act like she's in charge. This is the other element that's important for 2018. Women can lead effectively and bravely. She slowly learns that she is fully capable of seizing control and making the tough decisions, just like any successful leader.

The supporting actors all likewise play their roles well, without exception. Everyone feels a bit underutilized, which I suppose they understood when they accepted the parts. The inclusion of so many famous faces could be viewed as a statement emphasizing the importance of the film.

While I mentioned that there is very little blatantly wrong with the movie, I did personally find certain parts troublesome. Specifically, I call attention to the beginning and ending. Without spoiling anything, they felt oddly out of place, or at the very least, they felt unnecessary.

Perhaps Spielberg included them to make clearer the message of the movie. He wanted to establish the stakes. I didn't think we needed that. Movie viewers are smart enough to understand what makes this movie important. Thankfully, the movie avoided becoming overly preachy, aside from a couple sigh-worthy instances.

If you're down for a textbook "important history lesson" movie, The Post is for you. Just don't expect to leave the theater in stunned silence, like you did after seeing Spotlight.


36 of 60 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 499 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 January 2018 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Post See more »

Filming Locations:

White Plains, New York, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$50,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$526,011, 24 December 2017

Gross USA:

$81,903,458

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$179,777,947
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby Surround 7.1 | SDDS | DTS (DTS: X)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed