7.2/10
207
1 user 6 critic

Wasted! The Story of Food Waste (2017)

TV-MA | | Documentary | 13 October 2017 (USA)
Trailer
2:24 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Prime Video

Through the eyes of famous chefs, audiences will see how they make the most of every kind of food, transforming what most people consider scraps into incredible dishes that create a more secure food system.

Directors:

Anna Chai, Nari Kye
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Dan Barber ... Himself
Mario Batali ... Himself
Massimo Bottura ... Himself
Anthony Bourdain ... Himself
John Morgan John Morgan ... Brewer
Edit

Storyline

The issue of food waste is presented in light of the statistics: forty percent of food produced for human consumption in the US goes to waste; over ninety percent of this amount will end up in the landfill, where the waste produces methane gas - a greenhouse gas - in an anaerobic process as no oxygen is able to get to the material to decompose it; the cost of food waste is $1 trillion annually; and that there is still a global problem of human hunger despite the food that goes to waste. Food activists, including chefs, some of the celebrity variety, discuss the issue largely in context of the Environmental Protections Agency's (EPA) food pyramid which lists the preferred priority for the food produced (in order): that it reach humans for consumption; that it be used for animal/livestock feed; that it be converted into energy in the form of compost and/or something that can be used or converted for use, such as into electricity. They discuss the measures that some individuals, ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Story of Food Waste See more »

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 October 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Wasted! La folle histoire du gâchis alimentaire See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$17,189, 15 October 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$17,189, 15 October 2017
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
many parts are edible
12 October 2017 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. "Clean your plate!" Many of us heard those words at the dinner table as we were growing up. At the time, we assumed it was yet another way our parents conspired to keep us from going back outside to play. Co-directors Anna Chai and Nari Kye explain the much bigger picture – the global issue of wasted food.

The opening has culinary expert Anthony Bourdain wondering aloud if we even deserve to live. Merely mentioning the topic of food waste disgusts him. His philosophy is 'Use everything. Waste nothing'. Over the course of the film, some startling statistics are thrown at us: one-third of processed food is never eaten, and 90% of wasted food (U.S.) ends up in landfills at a cost of 1 trillion dollars and elevated methane levels.

Some influential chefs discuss their approach to creatively utilizing what was previously considered waste. Dan Barber, Mario Batali, and Massimo Bottura are all on the leading edge of experimenting with new approaches to create delicious dishes from what once was wasted food products. Barber offers Bouillabaisse as an example of a tasty, acceptable dish made from what is actually food waste.

We learn that food is wasted at every link in the supply chain: on the farm, at the grocery store, in restaurants, and on our plates. In response, the EPA has established a food waste pyramid with the goal of preventing, or at least minimizing waste. The upcycle is described as the prioritization of food waste: people-livestock- generate energy-create nutrient rich soil.

The film takes us through each level of this, and we make our way around the globe. The United States, Europe, Japan, Sweden and South Korea all have specific programs designed to reduce food waste. Writers, journalists, farmers, chefs, and food activists all offer insight and specifics on not just what the problem is, but also some of the possible solutions (which is quite refreshing).

Some unconventional approaches include beer made from bread, better distribution methods, stores and shelters serving creative dishes, feeding waste to pigs for improved pork flavor, fishing initiatives, converting yogurt to energy, and educating kids on growing and eating their own food. The most extreme routes involve Japan chefs using pig parts that even the most adventurous among us might balk at.

The Rockefeller Foundation sponsored the film and has pledged millions towards reducing food waste. The filmmakers leave us with the clear message that we don't need to produce more food, we simply need to act differently. There is an opportunity here for capitalism, and each of us can make a difference by paying attention to what we buy and what we throw away. The closing credit outtakes with Bourdain are comical, and of course, any film that includes Oscar the Grouch singing "I Love Trash" has something going for it.


4 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed