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The Image Book (2018)

Le livre d'image (original title)
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1:15 | Trailer
Nothing but silence. Nothing but a revolutionary song. A story in five chapters like the five fingers of a hand.

Director:

Jean-Luc Godard

Writer:

Jean-Luc Godard
5 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Jean-Luc Godard ... Narrator (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Dimitri Basil Dimitri Basil
Jean-Pierre Gos ... Voice-over
Anne-Marie Miéville Anne-Marie Miéville ... Narrator (voice)
Jacques Perconte Jacques Perconte ... Après le feu
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Storyline

Do you still remember how, long ago, we trained our thoughts? Most often we'd start from a dream. We wondered how, in total darkness, colours of such intensity could emerge within us. In a soft, low voice. Saying great things. Surprising, deep and accurate matters. Image and words. Like a bad dream written on a stormy night. Under western eyes. The lost paradises. War is here.

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Nothing but a revolutionary song. See more »

Genres:

Drama

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 45th feature film of French New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard. See more »

Connections

Features Diary of a Country Priest (1951) See more »

User Reviews

 
Godard still believes in the elemental power of cinema
3 February 2019 | by mikeygsmithSee all my reviews

When I screened A MAN ESCAPED in an Intro to Film class a few years ago, one particularly bright student seemed riveted by Bresson's radical and extensive use of first-person voice-over narration, close-ups of hands at work, and the unusual way these elements interacted with each other. In a post-screening discussion, he made the salient point that "It was as if Lieutenant Fontaine's hands were doing the thinking and the talking." I was reminded of this remark at the beginning of Jean-Luc Godard's THE IMAGE BOOK when a close-up depicts a man's hands splicing together two shots of 35mm film at an editing table. On the soundtrack, Godard's 87-year-old voice, now a sepulchral whisper, informs us that "man's true condition" is to "think with hands." This is shortly followed by what appears to be a documentary image of a concentration-camp victim's emaciated fingers. Hand imagery from a variety of sources - from a shot of Bunuel wielding a straight razor in the opening of UN CHIEN ANDALOU to the detail of an index finger pointing upwards in Da Vinci's painting John the Baptist - proliferates in the early stages of THE IMAGE BOOK. This serves to introduce the film's structure ("five chapters like the five fingers of a hand") and overall aesthetic strategy (mixing excerpts of narrative films with documentaries, high art, cell-phone videos, etc.); but, more importantly, it reminds us of Godard's belief that a filmmaker is ideally someone who works with his or her hands, operating "small instruments" like the analog equipment on which Godard begins the process of slicing and dicing the contents of his vast image data bank before he passes that footage on to his cinematographer/co-editor Fabrice Aragno for a digital upgrade.

After this brief prologue, THE IMAGE BOOK proper begins: The first four "chapters" feature Godard's associative montage at its most rigorous - he traces various images, ideas and motifs throughout film history (water, trains, war, the concept of "the law," etc.) in a manner not unlike that of his mammoth video essay HISTOIRE(S) DU CINEMA. But, even when it feels most familiar, these passages in THE IMAGE BOOK still show Godard to be a restless experimenter: The famous scene in Nicholas Ray's JOHNNY GUITAR where Sterling Hayden implores Joan Crawford to "lie" by professing her love for him (a scene Godard has already quoted in several other films) gets a new look by the introduction of a black screen during what should be a shot of Hayden, so that viewers only see the corresponding reverse-angle shot of Crawford in their charged dialogue exchange. Another new trick up the director's sleeve is the way he presents shots in a deliberately incorrect aspect ratio (i.e., the images appear horizontally stretched) before having them "pop" into the proper ratio, an amusing and oddly satisfying poetic effect. The film's darker and more disturbing elements, on the other hand, have caused some critics to categorize it as a "horror movie." In one instance, Godard provocatively juxtaposes an execution scene from Rossellini's PAISAN, in which Italian partisans are drowned by their Nazi captors, with eerily similar, recent non-fiction footage of ISIS executions. Elsewhere, he juxtaposes images of exploited performers - intercutting shots of a grinning "pinhead" from Tod Browning's FREAKS with someone performing anilingus in a pornographic film of unknown origin (the latter is identified only as "PORNO" in the lengthy bibliography that makes up most of the closing credits).

It's the fifth and final chapter, however, taking up almost the entire second half of the film, that sees Godard boldly striking out into truly new territory: This section examines how Western artists frequently misrepresent the Arab world by depicting it in simplistic and reductive terms (i.e., as either "joyful" or "barbaric"). Godard quotes extensively from authors I haven't read (e.g., Edward Saïd and Albert Cossery) but the overall meaning is clear in an extended scene that focuses on a fictional Arabic country named Dofa whose "underground has no oil" but whose Prime Minister nonetheless dreams of submitting all Gulf countries to his rule. What's incredible about this sequence is the startling way Godard conveys the "story" solely through his narration while the image track is comprised of a cornucopia of found footage from movies by both Western and Arabic filmmakers (not to mention some hyper-saturated shots apparently captured by Godard and Aragno on location in Tunisia that are the most visually ravishing in the film). That it's often difficult to determine where these shots came from is, of course, part of the point. In an otherwise war-and-death-obsessed work that feels even more despairing than usual for this gnomic artist, Godard does, however, express hope for the possibility of a new poetics of cinema, one in which Middle-Eastern and African filmmakers might discover new ways of seeing and hearing themselves. The wild sound design, always a highlight in late Godard, reaches new levels of expressiveness here as voices, sounds and snippets of music aggressively ping-pong back and forth between multiple stereo channels - essentially doing for the ears what the groundbreaking 3D of GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE did for the eyes. In a lengthy post-credits sequence, Godard's voice-over eventually devolves into a coughing fit while a rhapsodic dance sequence from Max Ophuls' LE PLAISIR gets the final word on the image track. In spite of what some of his detractors think, Godard still believes in the elemental power of cinema, which is why the mesmerizing IMAGE BOOK is a more accessible work than even many of its champions would have you believe. Spotting references and decoding meanings is ultimately less important than the sensorial experience of simply vibing with the uniquely romantic/pessimistic tone engendered by this giant of the medium's total mastery of "image et parole."


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Details

Official Sites:

Casa | Official Site | See more »

Country:

Switzerland | France

Language:

French | English | Arabic | Italian | German

Release Date:

25 January 2019 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Image Book See more »

Filming Locations:

Tunisia

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$13,854, 27 January 2019

Gross USA:

$94,153

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$130,802
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Surround 7.1

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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