Supernatural (2005– )
9.5/10
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18 user 3 critic

Don't Call Me Shurley 

Amara unleashes a dark fog on a small town that causes everyone to go mad. Dean and Sam realize this is a stronger version of the original black vein virus Amara previously unleashed.

Director:

Robert Singer

Writers:

Eric Kripke (created by), Robbie Thompson | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Jared Padalecki ... Sam Winchester
Jensen Ackles ... Dean Winchester
Rob Benedict ... Chuck Shurley / Carver Edlund / God
Curtis Armstrong ... Metatron
Tim Kelleher ... Sheriff Macready
Sonja Bennett ... Deputy Jan Harris
Jacob Richter ... Art Harris
Murry Peeters ... Deputy
Yoshié Bancroft ... Mother (as Yoshie Bancroft)
Raf Rogers ... Jack
Dawn Chubai ... Reporter
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Storyline

Amara unleashes a dark fog on a small town, which causes everyone to go mad. Sam and Dean realize this is a stronger version of the original black vein virus Amara previously unleashed. They team up with the sheriff to protect the town but the old remedy no longer works. Meanwhile, Chuck returns with an interesting proposal to stop Amara and save Lucifer and take Lucifer out of Castiel.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 May 2016 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo | DTS (Blu-ray release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The deputy who calls in the fog on her radio uses the call sign 3-William-56, which is Riggs and Murtaugh's call sign in Lethal Weapon (1987). See more »

Goofs

When the deputy shot by sheriff and fall, she bended the side mirror of the police car. But in the next scenes side mirror fixed back. See more »

Quotes

Sam Winchester: [to Dean] Dude, quit ironing my shirts with beer.
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Connections

References The Thing (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

End Credits Theme
Composed by Jay Gruska
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User Reviews

 
It's been a long time since Supernatural managed to impress me this much.
5 May 2016 | by chuckytranceSee all my reviews

It's going to be a very difficult time writing this review without any spoilers, but this is an episode that ultimately every viewer deserves to experience.

Don't get me wrong, there's some slight room for improvement, but there's a key quality about this episode that makes this episode a UNIQUE experience in the supernatural universe. I think the writers and creative directors are beginning to understand what kept us as viewers around for so long and why exactly viewer ship began to drop off during seasons 6-9.

It's quick and easy to assume that as fans we appreciate the flashy lights and disco balls rather than the substance undergoing beneath it. I mean the cool dramatic soundtrack, shiny Impala dolly shots, blood splatters, stabbings, one-liners, new biblical monsters, sappy bro to bro crybaby arguments, etc. are all cool, but that's not what makes Supernatural, Supernatural. Also, respectfully, that's not why most of us tuned into this show in the first place.

The reason why I'm basing my argument around these facts is because in this episode, whoever led the major creative direction, understood this concept. This episode wasn't filled with heart-pounding action, grindy orchestral music, visual effects out the wazoo, biblical dialogue, the latest and coolest new monster, or whatever filler-type materialistic substance that normally the supernatural team likes to regurgitate when their ideas are running dry.

No no no, THIS episode my friends, based its entirety on honesty, heart, and above all, respect. When watching this episode, you could really feel that Rhobbie Thompson (the writer), Robert Singer (director), and the other respected team-members, editors, etc stopped treating this show like a money-spewing soap opera and more of an actual TV show. This goes for the actors as well. Our characters, our universe, our beloved storyline deserves to be treated with respect. And that is what they did.

Let's start with Rob Benedict (the actor who plays Chuck). There's not much I can say without spoiling the entirety of the episode but ignoring his contribution to this episode would be an absolute betrayal. Because his performance was outstanding, in the acting work and in the singing world (lol right?). He provided a subtle and somber climax in the end that you cannot miss as a supernatural fan. And his new character was believable suited him like a glove. I respect the show for attacking their new character without glitter and glamor and more with a simple yet honest personality.

Curtiss Armstrong, who plays metatron, gave a memorable return as well, especially when his character was written with so much humanity in this episode. One of the most hated characters in the show proves his respectability and that comes from respect for your characters. His change in positivity proves that there is still room for character development and it's good to see that our creators recognize that.

Jared and Jensen gave it their all like always, so kudos to them for being passionate about their characters for so long.

This episode was not complicated, it wasn't an episode with a fancy new monster (like the stupid chitter creature), or Amara calling upon biblical powers to showcase new material, it was literally just two brothers caught in a dangerous situation, helping people, and the arch of a new character. When dialogue was present, especially between Chuck and Metatron, no soundtrack was present either. Emotion came from the actors themselves rather than whatever tonal sounds their composer throws out mid-scene.This, again, shows honesty. It didn't take long for them to show how much Sam and dean mean to each other, as one of their lives become compromised the other reacts. That's it, the simplicity shows respect, and that our characters are not material but displays of emotion. The climax at the end was SO subtle yet SO powerful. And it was accompanied with one of the most peaceful songs I've ever heard. Hopefully you know what I'm getting at with that point.

This episode and "Baby" are by far the show's most impressive episodes. And neither episode was really full with a ton of comical material (Baby was a friggin filler episode!). Both are written by Robbie Thompson, I don't think that's a coincidence.

Long review, sorry (I'm not really sorry).

CONCLUSION: THIS EPISODE WAS SUPERB, WATCH IT.


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