Happy End (2017) - News Poster

(2017)

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Tiff: Christian Petzold returns with "Transit"

Nathaniel R reporting from the Toronto International Film Festival

Fans of the haunting post-war German drama Phoenix (well loved right here), will want to check out the latest from one of Germany's greatest directors Christian Petzold. Like Phoenix, Transit is a story of lives tragically ruined by war and new identities emerging from the rubble. Transit isn't as much of an eery mystery as Phoenix, but it plays with similar themes. Our protagonist Georg played by the arresting, highly watchable Franz Rogowski (Happy End) initially appears to be an opportunist, doing two dangerous jobs for cash involving personal letters or actual transport for desperate people trying to escape attention in Germany on their way out of the country, and stealing another man's identity as his own ticket out. But our first impression is quickly complicated...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Review: The Wife is marvelously married to the concept of delivering a solid examination of marital malaise

Instinctively, The Wife embodies every notion that "behind every successful man there is a good woman" or something to that effect. In the case of Swedish director Bjorn Runge's literate marital melodrama this known sentiment stretches beyond the simplicity of that common saying. Indeed, The Wife has a captivating way about its quiet explosiveness that feels so effortless in its character study of elusive female empowerment at the helm of a troubled marriage and the contained emotional boundaries that are looking to burst from years of matrimonial malaise. What could have been essentially a cliched and conventional look at a typical marriage at the crossroads surprisingly resonates as a solid drama of conviction highlighted by a convincing and probing performance by Glen Close. In fact, Close's mature...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Two reports highlight 'positive impact' of Creative Europe on UK film industry

UK film industry has received €74m from Creative Eruope since 2014.

With the UK government wrestling with the Brexit crisis, two new reports have been published drawing attention to the positive effect of Creative Europe, the EU’s training and support programme on the UK’s film industry.

Both highlight the way Creative Europe has “deepened appetites” for the distribution of UK film and television in European markets and of European film and television in the UK.

The annual ‘Creative Europe In The UK’ report, published by Creative Europe, has revealed €74m ($87m) has been awarded to 334 UK-based organisations and companies
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Fantasia 2018’s Second Wave of Programming Includes Searching, Tales From The Hood 2, Blumhouse’s Hurt

Following their jam-packed first wave of announcements, Fantasia International Film Festival has revealed even more cinematic celebrations and screenings in their second wave of titles screening this summer in Montreal, including Tales From the Hood 2, the cyber thriller Searching, and Blumhouse's Hurt:

Press Release: Montreal, Quebec - June 14, 2018 - The Fantasia International Film Festival will be celebrating its 22nd Anniversary in Montreal this summer, taking place from July 12 - August 1, with its Frontières International Co-Production Market being held July 19 - 22. The full lineup of over 130 feature films will be announced on June 28. In the meantime, the festival is excited to reveal a selected Second Wave of titles and events.

Fantasia is proud to announce that the festival’s 22nd edition will open with the North American Premiere of Dans La Brume (“Just a Breath Away”), a large-scale genre co-production between France and Canada, directed by celebrated Quebec filmmaker Daniel Roby,
See full article at DailyDead »

Cannes 2018’s Hidden Thrill: The Opportunity to Find New Voices

  • Variety
Cannes 2018’s Hidden Thrill: The Opportunity to Find New Voices
On paper, this looks like a less than spectacular Cannes. Where are the stars? Where are the big names?

Just two of the 21 films in competition are American: Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” and David Robert Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake.” From the U.K., zero. Disney will bring “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” though it’s upstaging Cannes by holding the world premiere five days earlier in Hollywood. If you had to skip a year, this would be the time to do it, some have gone as far as to suggest.

I couldn’t disagree more. The fact that we don’t know what to expect from most of the films in competition makes this the most exciting lineup in ages — one with a genuine opportunity for discovery.

I’ve been attending Cannes since 2011. That’s how far you’d have to go back to find an edition with
See full article at Variety »

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?
Slim pickings this year make Cannes feel like the canary in the coal mine. While cinephiles and critics have plenty of promising art films to sample, the realities of a narrowing audience for specialty fare mean only a handful of the films on the Croisette will land a North American theatrical release.

For one thing, Harvey Weinstein is gone from the scene, having supplied Cannes for decades with Oscar-winners such as “Pulp Fiction,” “Life is Beautiful,” “The Piano,” and “The Artist.” Weinstein’s last Cannes official selection, Taylor Sheridan’s Un Certain Regard director-winner “Wind River,” was overlooked at Oscar time. And top-drawer stars may skip this year’s first Weinstein-free AmFAR Cinema Against AIDs fundraiser at the Hotel du Cap.

Also staying away this year is Woody Allen, who debuted “Cafe Society,” “Irrational Man,” “Midnight in Paris,” and “Match Point” on the Croisette. Amazon’s “Rainy Day in New York” stars hot-as-flapjacks Timothee Chalamet,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?
Slim pickings this year make Cannes feel like the canary in the coal mine. While cinephiles and critics have plenty of promising art films to sample, the realities of a narrowing audience for specialty fare mean only a handful of the films on the Croisette will land a North American theatrical release.

For one thing, Harvey Weinstein is gone from the scene, having supplied Cannes for decades with Oscar-winners such as “Pulp Fiction,” “Life is Beautiful,” “The Piano,” and “The Artist.” Weinstein’s last Cannes official selection, Taylor Sheridan’s Un Certain Regard director-winner “Wind River,” was overlooked at Oscar time. And top-drawer stars may skip this year’s first Weinstein-free AmFAR Cinema Against AIDs fundraiser at the Hotel du Cap.

Also staying away this year is Woody Allen, who debuted “Cafe Society,” “Irrational Man,” “Midnight in Paris,” and “Match Point” on the Croisette. Amazon’s “Rainy Day in New York” stars hot-as-flapjacks Timothee Chalamet,
See full article at Indiewire »

Vijay’s ‘Mersal’ wins international award

KollywoodThe film won the award, which is given based on fan votes, amidst stiff competition from movies from various other countries.Digital NativeThe Vijay starrer Mersal has won the Best Foreign Language Film at the 4th edition of the National Film Awards UK 2018. The award is given based on fan votes, it may be mentioned here. The film had stiff competition in this sector with several films from various countries, such as Happy End (France), Loveless (Russia), In the Fade (Germany/France), The Square (Sweden, Germany, France), A Fantastic Woman (Chile), Vaya (South Africa) and The Insult (Lebanon), in contention for the award. It may be mentioned here that Vijay was nominated for the Best Supporting Actor Award for the film. Directed by Atlee, Mersal is an action thriller that has Vijay playing the lead role with Kajal Aggarwal and Samantha as the female leads. The others in the star cast playing supporting roles include Sj Surya, Vadivelu and Sathyaraj. Despite facing some hurdles as it was caught up in a controversy after the Tamil Nadu unit of the Bjp demanded the removal of certain dialogues which criticised the Goods and Services Tax (Gst) and digital India, Mersal was a box office success. The film collected around Rs 251 crore worldwide, coming next only to Baahubali 2. The film performed exceptionally well overseas, especially in North America and even in countries like France and Australia. It has surpassed records held by Vishwaroopam in the Us, Kabali in the UK and is very close to breaking Enthiran’s record in Malaysia. Made on a huge budget of Rs 120 crores, the film was bankrolled by N Ramasamy, Hema Rukmani and H Murali under the banner Thenandal Studio Limited. The film also has a strong technical crew with the Oscar winning music composer Ar Rahman scoring the music, Gk Vishnu cranking the camera and Ruben editing it. Released on October 18 last year on the occasion of Deepavali, the film had a massive pre-release buzz. Mersal went on to score a century at the box office. As the news about Mersal bagging the prestigious international award came out, Vijay’s fans are elated. The star is currently busy playing the lead role in the untitled Ar Murugadoss directorial which is due to hit the silver screens on November 7 to coincide with Deepavali this year. Produced by Sun Picture’s Kalanidhi Maran, the film has Keerthy Suresh playing the female lead. (Content provided by Digital Native)
See full article at The News Minute »

Movie Review – Happy End (2017)

Happy End, 2017.

Written and Directed by Michael Haneke.

Starring Isabelle Huppert, Fantine Harduin, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Laura Verlinden, Franz Rogowski, Aurélia Petit, and Toby Jones.

Synopsis:

A drama about a family set in Calais with the European refugee crisis as the backdrop.

There is a lot going on in Happy End, the latest film from celebrated auteur Michael Haneke (Amour, Cache, The White Ribbon, so on and so forth), to the point where the end result is messy and disconnected. The characters are cold and unworthy of investing in, which isn’t a surprise to anyone familiar with the director, but long stretches of Happy End test patience and fail to generate any reaction. This is largely due to an unwieldy amount of subplots that never form into the bigger picture, even though all the major characters are part of the same dysfunctional, unhappy family. Depression and suicide are
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

We Shall Not Forget: the lost films of 2017

In this season of awards and pantheonic enshrinement, Dr. Garth Twa remembers those films that were treated negligently, their merits left to fallow.

This year at the Vancouver International Film Festival and at the London Film Festival—and it happens every year—there were films that shone, or stunned, or made a profound impact. But now they are gone. What zeitgeist clockwork, what Jungian tides, lead some films to acclaim and Oscars—like, say, in recent years, Lenny Abrahamson’s The Room or Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight, and rightfully so—while others sink and die like a forgotten Tamagotchi? There are some superb films in contention for awards this year, but three of the year’s best have been forgotten: The Meyerwitz Stories (New and Selected), possibly Noah Baumbach’s best film; A Ghost Story, by David Lowery, which was sublime, and something actually new under the sun; and Good Time
See full article at Pure Movies »

Berlin Review: ‘Transit’ is an Audacious, Beguiling Drama that Gets Under the Skin of Contemporary Concerns

Migration isn’t just a hot-button issue in the political arena. It’s a hot topic in your local arthouse theater, too. At Berlin’s film festival, the subject is everywhere–from Wolfgang Fischer’s Styx and documentaries like Central Airport Thf–perhaps natural for the capital of a country now home to more than a million recent asylum-seekers from the middle east and Africa.

Local boy Christian Petzold’s audacious retelling of Anna Seghers’s World War II-set novel about refugees escaping Nazi-controlled France is a strange, beguiling creation that will be hard to beat in the competition line-up, and ranks as a rare period piece that utterly gets under the skin of contemporary concerns. It’s an engrossing, uncanny and somewhat disturbing film, and completes something of a trio of historical melodramas after Barbara and his worldwide hit Phoenix, but develops the themes of those in an adventurous,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Introducing the 2018 European Shooting Stars

The 10 young European actors selected for this year’s Shooting Stars initiative are in town to meet the global film industry.

While young acting talent is spotlighted annually by initiatives such as Bafta’s Rising Star award and Screen International’s Stars of Tomorrow, European Film Promotion’s (Efp) Shooting Stars programme is the most visible celebration of next-generation thespian talent allied to an A-list film festival.

Each year, 10 young European actors are awarded the Shooting Star accolade at the Berlinale, a five-person jury having selected the winners from submissions by the 37 Efp member countries. The recipients travel to Berlin to meet producers, casting directors and other film industry figures, and are feted at a ceremony at the Berlinale Palast, which this year takes place on Monday February 19.

This year’s line-up includes UK Screen Star Of Tomorrow Michaela Coel, Norway’s Thelma star Eili Harboe, Hungary’s Réka Tenki, who appeared in last
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Transit’ Review: Christian Petzold’s Beguiling Refugee Romance Is Like a Kafkaesque ‘Casablanca’ — Berlinale 2018

  • Indiewire
‘Transit’ Review: Christian Petzold’s Beguiling Refugee Romance Is Like a Kafkaesque ‘Casablanca’ — Berlinale 2018
A man arrives in purgatory, eager to learn his eternal fate. The divine judgement, however, is slow to arrive. The minutes turn to hours, the hours turn to days, and the days begin to blur together in a place where time has no meaning. Eventually, after what feels to him like a hundred years, the man begs for a verdict. “What are you talking about?” comes the reply. “You’ve been in hell since you got here.”

That grim parable is told to Georg (“Happy End” breakout Franz Rogowski) roughly halfway into Christian Petzold’s “Transit,” and yet the poor bastard doesn’t seem to realize that it’s about him. The inscrutable hero of an inscrutable film that unfolds like a remake of “Casablanca” as written by Franz Kafka, Georg has just escaped occupied Paris by the skin of his teeth, stowing away on a train to the port of Marseille.
See full article at Indiewire »

Finding Hope In The Apocalypse: Talking ‘Black Mirror’ Season 4 & ‘Miracle Mile’ [Adjust Your Tracking Podcast]

Forget everything you just heard, and go back to sleep…

On this episode of Adjust Your Tracking, Joe and I get back on mic after a two-week break, and we run into the damn apocalypse of all things. Hate it when that happens. Mostly, though, we’re catching up on past titles (including, briefly, the year’s most ironically titled film in “Happy End,” from icy/austere genius Michael Haneke… see it, but only if you’re a fan) and skipping over whatever forgettable new releases have tripped and fallen into theaters lately.
See full article at The Playlist »

Michael Haneke Opens ‘Kelvin’s Book’ for 10-Part Series

Looking at responses, I think Happy End being a disappointment was in no small part a matter of time: after five years, Michael Haneke’s return was, by his count, ordinary, familiar, not substantial in any way that necessitates the fact that at least one more feature might’ve been made in the same stretch. I won’t say he’s making up for lost time, since a) it’s not my place, b) we both know he doesn’t give a damn about what we’re thinking, but it feels that way — length-wise, at least.

In his own words: “After ten TV movies and 12 films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once.” And so it’s to ten-part television with Kelvin’s Book, a “high concept series [that] is set in a dystopian world” wherein “a group of young people in a not too distant future […] are forced
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Kelvin’s Book’: Michael Haneke to Create His First TV Series, a High-Concept Drama Set in a Near-Future Dystopia

  • Indiewire
‘Kelvin’s Book’: Michael Haneke to Create His First TV Series, a High-Concept Drama Set in a Near-Future Dystopia
No longer content to confine his brand of feel-bad nihilism to movie theaters, Michael Haneke is working on his first TV series. “Kelvin’s Book” will consist of 10 episodes and is described as a high-concept venture by FremantleMedia’s Ufa Fiction, which is developing the series with everyone’s favorite Austrian auteur.

Read More:Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem

The series is “set in a dystopian world and will tell the adventurous story of a group of young people in a not too distant future. During a flight, they are forced to make an emergency landing outside of their home and are confronted with the actual face of their home country for the first time.” As for his motivations, Haneke said simply, “After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once.”

Read More:Michael Haneke
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael Haneke Goes Peak TV With ‘Kelvin’s Book’

For years, fans of Michael Haneke have hit their nearest arthouse to experience his perverse, cold-blooded, darkly humorous pictures. Now, the filmmaker is joining the throngs who are headed to television, for a project that truly sounds unlike anything he’s done before. If some have dismissed “Happy End” for playing the hits, so to speak, well Haneke has something truly original — at least for him — on the horizon.

Continue reading Michael Haneke Goes Peak TV With ‘Kelvin’s Book’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama
Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke has made many a masterpiece – and his latest, Happy End, isn't one of them. Yet this cinematic poke in the eye about an upper class family imploding still exerts a perverse fascination. From early provocations like The Seventh Continent (1989) through later boundary-pushing works like The Piano Teacher, Cache, The White Ribbon, Funny Games (both the original and it's English-language remake) and Amour, the fillmaker specializes in the toxic indifference that can kill a family or society as a whole. He offers no easy answers. As the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in January

  • Cineplex
Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryPhantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryAdriana Floridia1/3/2018 2:13:00 Pm

It's time to start a new year at the movies.

2017 was a wonderful year for film, but we're already looking forward to what 2018 has in store. This month we have a variety of art house, action, and sweet bears in blue jackets. Check out the movies you need to see in theatres this January below!

These are the movies you have to see this January:

Phantom Thread

Release Date: January 5th, 2018

For Fans of: Fashion, Romance, Paul Thomas Anderson

See it with: A friend

Daniel Day Lewis has formally announced that Phantom Thread will be his last film, as he's retiring from acting. In his last film performance, he plays a renowned dress
See full article at Cineplex »

Dan Talbot, In Memoriam: Exploring His Incalculable Legacy

  • Indiewire
Dan Talbot, In Memoriam: Exploring His Incalculable Legacy
Daniel Talbot, a distributor and exhibitor of enormous influence over specialized exhibition and distribution as well as the international film world, died Friday in Manhattan. He was 91. A memorial was held Sunday, December 31 at the Riverside Memorial Chapel with a capacity audience including many leading New York specialized players. Talbot’s wife and business partner, Toby Talbot, as well as daughters Nina, Emily and Sara attended the memorial, where the family spoke fondly about Talbot’s love for the comedian W.C. Fields.

Another more public post-holiday event marking the closing of the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas is scheduled on January 28 in New York. The last few weeks have seen Talbot’s legacy celebrated with reaction to the unexpected announcement that the six-screen Upper West Side theater would close at the end of January, at the expiration of its lease. Milstein Properties, who have been the Talbots’ co-partners in the theater since
See full article at Indiewire »
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