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Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World (2016) Poster

Quotes

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Lawrence Krauss: Most Science-fiction missed the most important thing in the world, which is the internet itself. They had flying cars. They had rocket ships. None of that exists, but the internet governs our lives today. It used to be that when you communicated with someone, the person you were communicating with was as important as the information; Now on the internet, the person is unimportant at all. Becoming your own filter will be the challenge of the future. Will our children's children's children need the companionship of humans - or will they have evolved in a world where that's not important? It sounds awful doesn't it? But maybe it will be fine, and the companionship of robots and an intelligent internet will be sufficient. Who am I to say?

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: This machine is so ugly that it's beautiful.

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Himself - Interviewer and Narrator: This is the campus of the University of California in Los Angeles. Today, no one of the students is aware that this is ground zero of one of the biggest revolutions we as humans are experiencing. One of the science buildings here is considered the birthplace of the internet.

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [Recalling the first internet message] Now, what was that first message? Many people don't know this.

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: All we wanted to do was log in from our computer to a computer 400 miles to the north up at Stanford Research Institute.

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: To log in, you have to type "L O G" and that machine was smart enough to type the "I N".

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: To make sure this was happening properly, we had our programmer and the programmer up north connected by a telephone handset, just to make sure it was going correctly.

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: So Charlie typed the "L"

[Mimicking the conversation over the telephone handset]

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: and said "You get the 'L'?"

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: Bill said, "Yup, got the L."

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: Typed 'O'.

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: "You get the 'O'?"

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: "Yup, got the 'O'."

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: Typed in the 'G' and crash! The SRI computer crashed.

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: So the first message ever on the internet was "LO", as in "lo and behold". We couldn't have asked for a more succinct, more powerful, more prophetic message than "LO".

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: The capacity on the ith channel, should be the traffic on the ith channel over the speed of the ith channel; plus how much capacity is left over - then you split it according to the square root of the traffic on that channel, over the summation of the square root over all channels. The mean response time will be equal to the average path length times the summation of the square root of the traffic on the J channel, over the sum of all the traffics; summed over all channels squared - over uc 1minus n-bar Rho.

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Himself - Interviewer and Narrator: [Referring to the corridor leading to room 3420 in Boelter Hall] The corridors here look repulsive and yet this one here leads to some sort of a shrine, reconstructed years later when it's importance had sunk in.

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [Approaching room 3420 in Boelter Hall] Let's enter this very special place.

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [after entering room 3420 in Boelter Hall] We're now entering a sacred location. It's the location where the internet began. It's a holy place and we've just come back to 1969 when the critical events of the origin began.

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [Referring to the Interface Message Processor] That machine over there is the first piece of the internet equipment ever installed.

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [In front of the Interface Message Processor] And it was from here that the first message was sent. A revolution began!

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Professor Leonard Kleinrock: [Referring to the IMP-LOG] And the only record we have of what happened that day is in this log.

[Reading from the log]

Professor Leonard Kleinrock: On October 29th, 1969 at 10:30 at night, we enter that we talked to Stanford Research Institute host to host, computer to computer. It's very much like when, on Columbus' ship, the fellow up on top first spotted land. He noticed it was and he basically made an entry saying "We spotted land". That document and this document have at least the same the same equivalent importance.

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