After having suffered a heart-attack, a 59-year-old carpenter must fight the bureaucratic forces of the system in order to receive Employment and Support Allowance.

Directors:

Ken Loach, Laura Obiols

Writer:

Paul Laverty (screenplay)
Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 29 wins & 38 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dave Johns ... Daniel Blake
Hayley Squires ... Katie
Briana Shann ... Daisy
Dylan McKiernan Dylan McKiernan ... Dylan (as Dylan Phillip McKiernan)
Kate Rutter ... Ann
Sharon Percy ... Sheila
Kema Sikazwe Kema Sikazwe ... China
Steven Richens Steven Richens ... Piper
Amanda Payne Amanda Payne ... Employment Support Allowance Assessor
Chris Mcglade Chris Mcglade ... At the Sawmill (as Chris McGlade)
Shaun Prendergast ... At the Sawmill
Gavin Webster ... At the Sawmill
Sammy T. Dobson Sammy T. Dobson ... Specialist Nurse
Mickey Hutton Mickey Hutton ... Neighbour with dog
Colin Coombs Colin Coombs ... Postman
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Storyline

A 59 year old carpenter recovering from a heart attack befriends a single mother and her two kids as they navigate their way through the impersonal, Kafkaesque benefits system. With equal amounts of humor, warmth and despair, the journey is heartfelt and emotional until the end.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Intensely Moving and Utterly Heartbreaking! See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Ken Loach is the oldest Palme d'Or winner ever. When he won on 22nd May 2016 for I, Daniel Blake (2016), he was 79 years old. See more »

Goofs

When Daniel is in the benefits office the adviser Ann notices he looks unwell and sits him down and gives Daniel a plastic cup of water. Initially when Daniel gets the cup there are two or three cups stick together, as sometimes happens, the film then cuts away and then back and Daniels cup has become just one plastic cup. See more »

Quotes

Daniel: Hello?
Harry Edwards: Hi, is that Daniel?
Daniel: Yes, it is. Hi.
Harry Edwards: Hi, Daniel, it's Harry Edwards here. We spoke the other day at the garden centre...
Daniel: Oh, yeah, yeah.
Harry Edwards: ...when you came down and handed your CV. How are you doing, mate? Are you all right?
Daniel: Yeah, yeah, I'm fine, thanks, yeah.
Harry Edwards: Er, listen. I tell you what, mate, I've been going through all the CVs I've had handed over the last couple of weeks. And I really like the look of yours. Erm, you've got the experience I'm looking for. I was wondering if you could possibly,...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

A very special thanks to workers within the DWP [Department for Work and Pensions] and PCS [Public and Commercial Services] Union who provided us with invaluable information but who must remain anonymous. [Government edict that public employees in these departments cannot speak publicly about their work.] See more »

Connections

Referenced in Antiques Roadshow: Abbey Pumping Station 2 (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Sailing By
(1963)
Composed by Ronald Binge
Performed by The Alan Perry/William Gardner Orchestra as The Perry/Gardner Orchestra
Conducted by Ronald Binge
Licensed courtesy of Mozart Edition (Great Britain) Ltd.
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User Reviews

 
Unapologetically Political, Openly Moral
21 September 2016 | by ilpohirvonenSee all my reviews

After Ken Loach's latest film "I, Daniel Blake" (2016) took home the most prestigious film award of the year, Palme d'Or at Cannes earlier this summer, there has been a lot of discussion or at least anticipation of discussion on the film. The Guardian, for one, published a long article where people from all walks of life shared their differing opinions on the film. As a fierce story of social relevance, telling about an ailing carpenter whose life goes to pieces in the vast sea of bureaucracy, "I, Daniel Blake" is bound to be criticized for being didactic and demagogic as it hits the commercial screens. Some will fall in love with the film for its honest authenticity, while others will be put off by its unapologetic directness.

The film begins with the title character, Daniel Blake going through an assessment in the unemployment office after his doctor has deemed him unfit for work due to a heart condition. Unfortunately, Daniel ends up in a paradoxical position, the likes which Kafka could have devised, where he is not concerned unhealthy enough to apply for sickness benefit and has to therefore apply for job seeker's allowance, coercing him into a pointless cycle of searching for jobs he cannot really take. In the middle of this absurd jungle of gray offices and red tapes, Daniel befriends Katie, a single mother of two in a similar situation. Daniel's cardinal sin in the bureaucratic world is his refusal to play by its rules, to fake and to pull the strings where needed.

Loach is known for his simplicity in both style and narrative without ever coming close to minimalism. His simplicity is of a different kind, a simplicity of the heart on the level of the subject matter which is often social by nature. This simplicity gives room for the unfolding of story and character in their natural state which is of the utmost importance for Loach's intentions. At times warm and funny, at others raw and brutal, the story of "I, Daniel Blake" is hard to be dismissed for its authenticity. It will likely speak to most people as do the great realist novels of the 19th century. It is a simple voice with real thought and emotion behind it, saying something of relevance, straight out and loud. While the title of the film might pave way for quasi-libertarian interpretations of Loach's critique of the social benefits system, his intentions could not be clearer to those who have seen the film. The titular character is merely someone to carry the torch of solidarity; to Loach and others, he represents a mass of millions. Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian wrote that the film "intervenes in the messy, ugly world of poverty with the secular intention of making us see that it really is happening, and in a prosperous nation." This is the simplicity which gives Loach's cinema its moral aura.

Although many may feel put off by the film's direct social message and strong moral pathos, which can feel didactic or even demagogic at times, and it will not find its dearest fan in yours truly either, I think the film deserves acclaim for its integrity. The film does not hide its rhetoric or its message. After all, its "leftist agitation" may not be stranger than the ideology of upper middle class family life propagated by contemporary popular culture. The way I see it, "I, Daniel Blake" is more a personal expression of worry and concern rather than manufactured propaganda with an impersonal agenda. At worst the film might be preachy or sentimental, but at best it is the most authentic thing Ken Loach has done since "My Name Is Joe" (1998), a parallel work in the truest sense of the word. To put it bluntly, I am glad that "Jimmy's Hall" (2014) did not end up being the legacy Loach left for cinema; but "I, Daniel Blake" could very well be just that.


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Details

Country:

UK | France | Belgium

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 June 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

I, Daniel Blake See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,682, 4 June 2017

Gross USA:

$260,354

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$15,793,051
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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