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The Limehouse Golem (2016)

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As music-hall star Elizabeth Cree awaits her sentence for the death of her husband John, Inspector Kildare suspects he may have died by the hand of the serial killer responsible for the series of murders that has shaken Victorian London.

Director:

Juan Carlos Medina

Writers:

Jane Goldman (screenplay), Peter Ackroyd (based on the novel by)
Reviews
Popularity
2,799 ( 128)
3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Douglas Booth ... Dan Leno
Olivia Cooke ... Lizzie Cree
Sam Reid ... John Cree
María Valverde ... Aveline Ortega
Daniel Mays ... George Flood
Bill Nighy ... John Kildare
Peter Sullivan ... Inspector Roberts
Michael Jenn ... News Reporter
Daniel Cerqueira Daniel Cerqueira ... Evening Post Reporter (as Daniel Cerquiera)
Patrick Durham Patrick Durham ... Elderly Man
Louisa-May Parker Louisa-May Parker ... Mrs. Gerrard
Adam Brown ... Mr. Gerrard
Nicholas Woodeson ... Toby Dosett
Paul Ritter ... Augustus Rowley
Mark Tandy ... Judge
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Storyline

As music-hall star Elizabeth Cree awaits her sentence for the death of her husband John, Inspector Kildare suspects he may have died by the hand of the serial killer responsible for the series of murders that has shaken Victorian London.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Before the Ripper, fear had another name.


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Irish

Release Date:

8 September 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Os Crimes de Limehouse See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Number 9 Films See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

At the end of the end credits, the following dedication appears on the screen: "This film is dedicated to the memory of Alan Rickman" See more »

Goofs

When Eddie Marsan's character 'Uncle' strips off to reveal a chest full of tattoos many are obviously 'temporary' stick on ones (especially below his right shoulder). See more »

Quotes

John Kildare: Wasting my time could cost lives.
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Connections

Featured in Projector: The Limehouse Golem (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

What Did She Know About Railways?
Written by C. G. Cotes
Music by Bennett Scott
Performed by Olivia Cooke
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User Reviews

 
Uneven but Engaging
10 September 2017 | by camarshall-36934See all my reviews

Despite being yet another film set in London (yawn) The Limehouse Golem is atmospheric and will certainly hold your attention. This is partly due to the detailed scenic constructions that create a dark, intimate atmosphere but also due to the excellent casting. Juan Carlos Medina brings out the best in the cast. Watch how he uses the actors' eyes to communicate directly with the audience via the camera lens. Oliva Cooke, alternately resembling Emma Watson and Julia Roberts, glows and sparkles and then freezes as the film jumps between her recalled memory and her jail cell. Sadly, the usually wonderful Bill Nighy only hints at his customary quirkiness and the inferred gayness of Nighy's Inspector Kildare and Daniel May's gentle George Flood seems strangely pointless. The interplay between audience the stage of the music hall and the audience draws the cinema audience right into the heart of the action. The music hall scenes are beautifully re-imagined and are a joy to watch. Douglas Booth turns in a beautifully sensitive portrayal of Dan Leno that reminded me of Eddie Redmayne in the Danish Girl.

Despite the fact that the film is a little under-written - I worked out the identity of the Golem about one third of the way through the film -

this is a very enjoyable and convincing tale that is well told. My major criticism of the film is that it is overlong. Sometimes less is more and the film would have benefited by tighter editing of the final scenes where fantasy and fact become confused leading to the audience being not quite sure what is happening.

Overall, though, a very enjoyable couple of hours spent in the cinema and please, film producers,let's have more films like this. But please also remember that London was not the only location in the UK where dark deeds happened in Victorian times. There was, and is, life and interest outside London.


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