Waiting for You (2017) Poster

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8/10
Perfect balance of beauty and soul
zhivago972 July 2021
This movie is successful because of its nuances. It lacks significant action, yet the pace is perfect. It lacks a big reveal, yet has many small reveals that build the suspense and keep the storyline moving along.

The acting is terrific. The cinematography is great, each scene is perfectly framed. The musical score is subtle and complimentary, never gratuitous or annoying. The plot is not complicated, yet offers just enough intrigue to make you wonder what might happen next.

It's a wonderful example of balance: a little of this and a touch that - never too much of anything. And the result when all ingredients come together is a terrific blend. Minus any of those pieces, or overdoing one and underdoing another, it would have been too bland and off balance. This movie came together perfectly with all the right ingredients.
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8/10
BEAUTIFUL MOVIE
kallaspandana3 June 2021
A SIMPLE AND LOVELY MOVIE. THERE ARE MANY TWISTS IN THE MOVIE.
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8/10
Slow burn
lrideal3 July 2018
This is a great film - subtle and slow, tense and interesting. It offers a new take on the French country house, and seems to have in the background shades of Le Grand Meaulnes....it's not a love story yet it is (x 2) - and it also speaks of family and passion, secrets and lies. It celebrates all those aspects of French small town delights at the same time as being critical and then disarmingly frank about the nature of war crimes. To describe this film as charming does not do it justice as it is also a kind of thriller. There is great attention to detail and the narrative propels us firmly along, without revealing too much too soon. Additionally, the use of colloquial French by Silvie (the younger woman) is genuine and adds a credibility often lost in similar but badly translated equivalent French/British films. There is much to recommend about this personal long term project with its surprising denouement.
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6/10
Not really worth the wait
bryangary6513 November 2018
Slightly disappointed with the film given its high review average score.

Took a long time to get to the climax which was slightly underwhelming.

Movie did have an atmosphere feel to it though, and Morgan is always watchable and the lead French Actress was very classy
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9/10
Waiting for You - pulls you in and does not want to let go
jessicawijnman28 August 2018
Waiting for You had me transported inside a bubble where there was nothing but the film and me. The cinematography is stunning, especially when in France, but also the scenes in dreary England are lifted by the special points of view, close-ups and setting in the story. When used the music is wonderful and each time maximises the impact of the scenes. The story seems uncomplicated, but has great depths and addresses serious issues in a thoughtful way. The spare use of flashbacks adds to the realisation that there is more going on than first impressions might suggest. The performances of Fanny Ardant and Colin Morgan are subtle and superb, greatly enhancing the intentions of the writers and producers Charles Gerrad and Hugh Stoddart. This film is clearly a labour of love from everyone involved and deserves a lot more exposure to the main public than it has received so far. If you can, you must go and see !
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9/10
Poignant poetic
robinwghayter29 September 2018
Filmmaking written shot and played just right. I was drawn in and momentum only stopped when and where it should, that is to take in, to sense the moment. Several of which will stay with me for some time.
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9/10
Beautiful, compelling,stylish
jonathanwhitelocke18 July 2018
What a joy to come across such a beautiful, compelling and entertaining film, when I wasn't gripped by tension I was bowled over by its rich visual language and charmed by the story unveiled in it's narrative. A simple tale, with intriguing and gripping twists, shot with stunning style. Loved it!
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9/10
The perfect film?
kirstymcintosh-757391 October 2018
I think so. Take a satisfying blend of visual beauty and thoughtful dialogue, add a taught story line and superb acting and the result, for me, is the perfect film. Before leaving the cinema I knew that I wanted to see the film again.
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9/10
Visually stunning
An extraordinary movie - it manages to be thrilling and thoughtful at the same time. Great acting and beautifully directed: it left me wanting to see it again, and again.
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10/10
Outstanding film
biljanatesic-1284427 October 2018
Superb script, excellent cast... all in all outstanding film on every level and at every stage. Intelligent, captivating, thought provoking - superbly shot and edited... can't wait for Charles' next film. Enjoyed it immensely THANK YOU!
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10/10
A little gem
virginiebb3 July 2018
'Waiting For You' is a beautiful and moving film. The characters draw you in from the start; the tragic story portrays so well the hidden emotions we all carry inside before ultimately bringing the smile of hope; and the timeless photography makes you fall in love with the house. This movie is refreshing by its simplicity yet depth. And the charismatic French actress Fanny Ardant and the young English actor Colin Morgan gave excellent performances, too.
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5/10
The Little House
lavatch10 July 2021
Warning: Spoilers
"Waiting for You" was nicely photographed with some beautiful rustic scenes in France. But the slow pacing, the self-indulgent nature of the characters, and the "artiness" of the film were liabilities.

The focus of the film is on young Paul Ashton's effort to honor his father by learning the truth about dear old dad's final words before his death. Paul's adventure takes him from the UK to France as he follows a clue left on a post card.

Nestled in the woods in a beautiful forest setting is the dilapidated home of Madeleine Brown, a formidable woman who commands the screen, as performed by Fanny Ardant. Paul treats Madeline shabbily as she withholds from him that as a young boy she treated him virtually as a mother on a visit that he has long forgotten. Her revelation of the truth to him should have settled matters.

The deep, dark secret that the father withheld was that he had an affair with Madeline that ended in the death of a little boy, Phillipe. In the film's most ghoulish scene, the body of the child is unearthed in a little coffin by the relentless and obsessive Paul.

My favorite character in the film was Sylvie, a young woman whom Paul meets in France. Sylvie falls in love with him, but Paul is once again standoffish. It stretched some credibility that the two characters eventually seemed to head off into the sunset together in the end.
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7/10
Charles Garrad directed
sjanders-8643012 June 2021
Colin Morgan and Fanny Ardent sizzle. They have a fascination for each other that lights up the old house and gardens. A box is found under the ground. A young girl has no chemistry like the older one. Morgan's father was captivated by Ardent and now so is his son. Ardent wants to give him the house in Languedoc, but he refuses. She did love his father. A toy car is found. What baby lived in the house? This film is testament to film's ability to pick up chemistry. It could have been a silent film. The cinematography is hand held I read. There is a split personality to this film I also read. The plot line is unclear about what happened in the past. Maybe that lack of clarity is this film's weakness. I don't know what happened in the past. I don't know what was in the buried box. I don't know what child lived in that house. If the screenplay by Stoddard stayed with boy meets father's old love as the springboard to much more between the two that could work.

I feel I could not write a plot line for this film.
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8/10
Peeling Back the Layers
kevinmaynard-2603423 August 2018
A long time in the making, this tautly plotted and extremely economical film gradually peels back the layers of a recently dead parent's past. Superbly intense acting from Paul Ashton, the troubled son (Colin Morgan) on the one hand, and Madeleine Brown, a mysterious older woman (the fabulous Fanny Ardant) who is living a Miss Havisham-like existence in a crumbling 18th century mansion in rural France, find themselves caught in a duplicitous game of cat and mouse. He wants to know 'the truth'; she wants to protect her own knowledge of what 'really happened'. Nothing is what it at first seems, of course, or not as we expect. It may or may not be a sort of ghost story. How much are we entitled to know about someone else's past? How far should we go in pursuit of such knowledge? How much are we allowed to keep secret about our own---perhaps to shield the person who thinks they deserve this information, or perhaps to protect ourselves? There are a number of minor but important characters, none of whom is irrelevant to the action of the film. That fine director and actor, Abdelkrim Bahloul, has a key role as Ahmed, the handyman and gardener who grows his own vegetables on part of Madeleine Brown's overgrown estate. Sylvie, the waitress temping in the village's only bar (Audrey Bastien), who feels attracted to Paul, but is also frustrated by his secretiveness and obsessiveness, is sensitively portrayed. Complex themes (colonialism, military atrocities, trauma, bereavement, guilt, the complexities of family relationships) are handled with great subtlety. The camerawork is never less than precise and often very beautiful: the writing and direction are both deft and confident. Even if the multiplexes won't go for this (no huge explosions, breathless car-chases or blockbuster CGI, though there's plenty of genuine suspense), it deserves the widest possible showing in art-house cinemas.
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7/10
Still thinking
winwld8 November 2018
The headline is a compliment. For me the film was about a range of issues faced by people all over the world: the secrets we choose or feel we have to keep: the impact of our past, especially the brutality of war, on our lives and the lives of everyone we are close to: the chosen landscapes that suggest options and choices; resolution and moving forward with renewed energy and wisdom as we learn and free ourselves. The discussion with the script writer was helpful in coming to a deeper understanding of the process. I do not know how to award stars other than to say it is a film worth seeing. MB
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10/10
Superb and subtle movie
tjdanvers6 November 2020
Waiting for You is a superb movie - a really satisfying cinematic experience. A beautiful, intelligent and engrossing narrative - visually stunning and coherent, yet full of subtle surprises. Somehow the director has managed to combine a delicately observed love story with a tale of loss and a search for truth. This is a film in which each frame has been carefully considered both for its importance to the story and for its aesthetic beauty. The storyline unfolds in a sequence of carefully revealed hints and clues that are both enigmatic and robust. The dialogue is beautifully written and the house in France becomes a character in itself, telling its own story. The acting is excellent throughout, but particularly the two leads, who interact in ways that are wholly believable and yet full of surprises. The whole movie has a measured pace and eloquence that will sustain repeated viewing. Wonderful.
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10/10
Is has Colin Morgan in it, what more do you want?
Janet161211 June 2022
An odd tale which ended with not much happening. Great to hear Sitting in the Park - I've been playing the Georgie Fame version - great song.

Great acting, lovely scenery and of course the wonderful Colin Morgan.

Paul (Morgan) has been told something by his dying father and off he goes to France. It's a lovely drama with not much happening, but whilst nothing is happening, it's great just relaxing and watching it.
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5/10
I had high hopes
robdrummond23 May 2022
Warning: Spoilers
Having watched the trailer I had high hopes. Sadly it was not to be. A boring storyline with little or no mystery and - oh yeah "the guy got the girl" - but not before turning down a mansion for free. (Yeah really?)

Yawn yawn.
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8/10
Charming, understated classy film
christinajodell1 October 2018
Thoroughly enjoyed this British film. Beautifully shot with sensitive performances from the whole cast. Tackled some difficult subjects without being horrific. Left me thinking . . .
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6/10
Brilliant acting, story was missing something
nelnyr4 February 2022
The acting was brilliant and the cinematography beautiful. My issue was the script - the flow of the story was difficult to follow at times and the plot was not fully cohesive.
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9/10
Brilliantly written, subtle cinematography, beautiful performances
maggie-092971 October 2018
I was intrigued by the title and soon realised it was linked to a piece of music, which became a strong thread linking the past to the present. As a result, the flashbacks were judicially used with music as a memory driving the film forward. The film is engrossing and there are no slow spots. We follow the main character Paul (Colin Morgan) on a helter-skelter drive through Eurotunnel, away from a wintery England and into the majestic green hills and mountains of France to unravel the secret of his recently deceased father's early life. Paul's first meeting with the scarily gothic character Madame Brown (Fanny Ardant) sets the tone for a mysterious journey of discovery which set my pulse racing - at one point I couldn't look at the screen -down to excellent writing, terse editing and clever cinematography. Everyone in the cinema was holding their breath. Clean, lean and clever with great, visual performances - including Clare Holman - as Paul's mother - in the early scenes clearly delineating the background and I enjoyed the inclusion of the local girl Sylvie to act as a morale booster and a moral centre for the film. Congrats to all involved.
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10/10
A must watch film
bronwencruickshank8 November 2018
Very enjoyable and thought-provoking film. Very well acted. I would highly recommend it.
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9/10
Captivating
studio-491212 August 2018
This captivating film transported me to a sumptuous landscape peopled by rounded thoughtful characters. It is a compelling tale well told and very beautifully photographed. Fanny Ardent and Colin Morgan act so well together. The crumbling french mansion creates the most beautiful and poignant of backdrops. This film is great therapy.
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9/10
Gripping!
ben-611-2837226 July 2018
Beautifully shot with amazing locations and some excellent performances.
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9/10
Waiting for You - beautiful, wise and haunting
gabriellehelix5 August 2018
I loved this film - its fascinating, assured and rich and its satisfactions stay with me long after I have seen it. Its hauntingly beautiful but at the same time, very well paced, there is nothing ponderous or indulgent, a rare achievement to be both lean and evocative. So its a compelling voyage of discovery for the transitions of youth and of middle age too - it's rewarding to have the lifecycle considered so holistically. Part of its brilliance seemed the way in which the initially mysterious, opaque and secret again and again turn out to be deeply familiar and known - the banal cruelty of war and colonialism, the insistence of memory, the complexity of love and loss and the slow work of mourning. It looks beautiful and I loved the opening scenes in the UK too, the great variety of music and the getting to know the location (the house and village) over time. It's precious to see a film which feels so perfectly judged and hewn, full of life and wisdom.
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