Nature (1982– )
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Mystery Monkeys of Shangri-La 

This is the true story of a family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living in the highest forests in the world. Only recently discovered, snub-nosed monkeys are hauntingly beautiful primates, ... See full summary »

Writer:

Mark Fletcher

Star:

BD Wong
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
BD Wong ... Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

This is the true story of a family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living in the highest forests in the world. Only recently discovered, snub-nosed monkeys are hauntingly beautiful primates, gentler than others of their kind. Elfin-like, they seem both childlike and wise beyond their years. The family is led by a formidable fighter and his fighting force who guard a troop of 8-10 families. The survival of this unique monkey society, formed in response to the hardships of the Himalayas, depends on strong defensive strategies and the cooperation and interdependence of them all.

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Certificate:

TV-G
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 April 2015 (USA) See more »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
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Connections

Featured in Terra Mater: Die Zauberwesen von Shangri-La (2015) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Adorable monkey antics in a Himalayan Valley
17 June 2017 | by BrianDanaCampSee all my reviews

The "Nature" crew follows a unit of Chinese nature photographers to a beautiful, lush valley in the eastern Himalayas, situated in Yunnan Province, where they locate a group of families of snub-nosed snow monkeys and decide to focus on two new-born baby males whom they determine to be half-brothers. The episode then follows the progress of the babies over the next six months through fall and winter. One of the babies, dubbed a "prince" by the narrator (BD Wong), is cosseted by his mother with parenting help from the others in her family, while the other baby is practically abandoned by his mother and only occasionally cared for by his father and some of the other adults in his group. Tragedy strikes when a rival tribe led by an alpha male "pirate king," in the words of the narrator, descends on the valley and basically takes over this group of families. Left to fend for himself, the second baby figures out how to survive on the ample pickings of the valley's vegetation and stays near enough the group to occasionally meet and play with his brother on those rare occasions when the brother is allowed out of his mother's protective grasp. It has a happier ending than many "Nature" episodes and gives us a beautifully photographed look at endearing monkey toddlers who each have distinct personalities. We occasionally see the valley's human inhabitants, a group of Tibetans who herd yaks and live chiefly on foodstuffs derived from yak butter. As more Chinese discover the valley and find ways to enter it and harvest some of the herbs growing there, we are left to ponder the fate of these snow monkeys as the outside world encroaches.


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