Downton Abbey (2010–2015)
8.6/10
720
2 user 1 critic

Episode #6.5 

Violet embroils the Minister of Health in the hospital row, but his visit ends in catastrophe. Mary's suspicions are aroused.

Director:

Michael Engler

Writer:

Julian Fellowes (written and created by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Hugh Bonneville ... Robert Crawley, Earl of Grantham
Laura Carmichael ... Lady Edith Crawley
Jim Carter ... Charles Carson
Raquel Cassidy ... Baxter
Brendan Coyle ... John Bates
Michelle Dockery ... Lady Mary Crawley
Kevin Doyle ... Joseph Molesley
Michael Fox ... Andy
Joanne Froggatt ... Anna Bates
Matthew Goode ... Henry Talbot
Robert James-Collier ... Thomas Barrow
Allen Leech ... Tom Branson
Phyllis Logan ... Mrs. Hughes
Elizabeth McGovern ... Cora Crawley, Countess of Grantham
Sophie McShera ... Daisy Mason
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Storyline

In London Edith has a date with Bertie as well as appointing an editrix but Mary discovers her sister's secret, at the same time assuring Tom that Henry Talbot is merely a friend. Barrow finds out young footman Andy's weakness whilst a court case brings Baxter and Molesley closer together and Denker has cause to be grateful to Spratt. Violet invites health minister Neville Chamberlain to dinner in her plan to defeat Isobel and Cora and their supporters over the hospital but the event is overshadowed by a family emergency. Written by don @ minifie-1

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 October 2015 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16 : 9
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Tom asks minister Chamberlain (a real historical figure) how Violet manage to invite him, Chamberlain mentions his brother-in-law Horace De Vere and Tom recalls a prank on a warship. The incident, "The Dreadnought Hoax", really happened in 1910 when De Vere and his circle of friends (including Virginia Woolf) boarded the Royal Navy's flagship HMS Dreadnought dressed as Abyssinian royals and demanded to see the ship. They received the treatment of a state visit, complete with a parade (where the wrong anthem was played) and a formal photograph, always speaking among themselves in a made-up language while De Vere "translated". On having any particular part of the ship pointed out the fake delegation would exclaim "bunga, bunga!" in admiration. The visit was cut short when a light drizzle threatened the makeup of the pranksters, but they disembarked without being discovered. As expected, the Royal Navy was a laughingstock for several months, and the admiral and officers involved had to endure yells of "bunga, bunga" whenever they went. While De Vere and his friends were summoned for punishment, there was none in the end. The prank was remembered, nevertheless, as during WW1 HMS Dreadnought managed to sink a German submarine and, reportedly, among the congratulatory telegrams, one arrived bearing the message "BUNGA, BUNGA". See more »

Goofs

At the dinner for Mr Chamberlain, the Earl of Grantham is suddenly taken ill, and is diagnosed with a perforated ulcer. This condition would, however, rarely present with major bleeding as shown here, but rather with intense abdominal pain. He is taken to the local, very small hospital and operated on. In a telephone call to Mr Carson, the Earl is said to have undergone a gastrectomy (removal of all or part of the stomach). This is a major surgical operation, taking in excess of 1-2 hours, which would require resources far beyond those of this hospital, and would also not be indicated for these symptoms. The preferred procedure in a perforated ulcer case under these circumstances would be to close the perforation, which is a much smaller and less dangerous operation. See more »

Quotes

Miss Denker: [to Spratt] Am I to blame if I have a passionate nature?
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Soundtracks

Molly Malone
(uncredited)
Traditional
Performed by Jeremy Swift
[Spratt sings to himself while reading the newspaper]
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User Reviews

safe auto racing..
29 January 2019 | by merelyaninnuendoSee all my reviews

Downton Abbey

Fellowes has successfully managed to make a soap opera melodrama, luxury rather than a necessity. This royal family and the impact it casts upon others surrounding them is the ultimate definition of royalty, in terms of that it spews each of our assumptions of the livelihood of people residing in such palace onto the screen with elegance and stature that does more than people-pleasing work. The emotions comes in plethora of it- hence arguable the titled genre melodrama- but what doesn't come in hand is the content, the writers fiddles with you with such panache that you are rumble down to be gullible enough to nod at anything offered. And this is primary the reason, why in its middle seasons, where the writing was questioned and yet loved and accepted by us effervescently.

Its primary theme that it adapts or conjures for an episode is shared by an entire cast that makes the episode balance and all the tracks, no matter how long they may carry on later, gets a definite period within that hour for you to pin down your decision. The most difficult part of the writers is to pass on information or rumors in this too-big-a-palace but with flawed three dimensional characters, it is weaved out with excellent justifying reasons leaving you in an awe of it.

Fellowes doesn't share its cast, nor a scene, nor humor, nor any anchor that would weight him down to take bold risks, he doesn't compromise on lopping off a character from the screen or adding one despite of being shared by so many, he has managed to reboot the drama until every last viewers gets that point jaggedly on mark. The series is also blessed with incredible cast like Dockery, Bonneville, Carter, Coyle and Smith that stands out among plenty other performances. Downton Abbey is, yes, cheesy, but each aspect of the series owns it, and with commitment like such comes maturity and just good storytelling.

Season 06

The final act can arguably be considered as the aftermath of all, polishing the dull mistakes and unsatisfied characters hanging on a thread, the makers have decided to keep it low on possibly every bit of drama since they have already been through a lot

Episode #6.5

Smith has gotten, as always, a quirky role to play that always borders along being funny or straight out rude, but the spotlight is once again snatched by Dockery's performance and her new discovery especially after she gets her teeth sink in deep.


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