Donald Cried (2016) - News Poster

(2016)

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‘The Big Sick’ Wins Indie Spirit Award for Best First Screenplay

‘The Big Sick’ Wins Indie Spirit Award for Best First Screenplay
The Big Sick” writers Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon took home top honors at the 2018 Indie Spirit Awards for Best First Screenplay. The married writing team beat out fellow nominees Ingrid Jungermann (“Women Who Kill”), Kogonada (“Columbus”), David Branson Smith and Matt Spicer (“Ingrid Goes West”), and Kris Avedisian with story by Kyle Espeleta and Jesse Wakeman (“Donald Cried”).

This marks the first Indie Spirit Award for both Nanjiani and Gordon. “The Big Sick” won Best Comedy at the Critics’ Choice Awards, and was named one of the American Film Institute’s Top Ten Films of the Year. The duo is nominated for Best Screenplay at the Academy Awards Sunday night. Loosely based on the real-life romance between Nanjiani and Gordon, the film follows a couple who must deal with cultural differences after one of them becomes ill.

Different from the Oscars, the Independent Spirit Awards exclusively celebrates the best of independent cinema.
See full article at Indiewire »

2018 Independent Spirit Awards: Every film, every nomination at the 33rd Indie Spirits

2018 Independent Spirit Awards: Every film, every nomination at the 33rd Indie Spirits
The 2018 Independent Spirit Awards will be handed out on March 3, one day before the Oscars, during an afternoon ceremony on Santa Monica. The 33rd Indie Spirits, hosted for the second year in a row by the comedy team of Nick Kroll and John Mulaney, will air live on IFC.

Luca Guadagnino‘s “Call Me by Your Name” has a leading six nominations with both Ben and Josh Sadfie‘s “Good Time” and Jordan Peele‘s “Get Out” contending in five races apiece. Greta Gerwig‘s solo directorial debut “Lady Bird” follows with four.

Below, the full list of contenders broken down by film.

See 2018 Independent Spirit Awards: What time do 33rd Indie Spirits start, who will win, who hosts?

Six Nominations

Call Me by Your Name

Picture, Director (Luca Guadagnino), Actor (Timothee Chalamet), Supporting Actor (Armie Hammer), Cinematography, Film Editing

Five Nominations

Get Out

Picture, Director (Jordan Peele), Actor (Daniel Kaluuya), Screenplay,
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Best Movie Posters of 2017

  • MUBI
1. mother!Darren Aronofsky’s divisive nightmare boasted a number of very striking posters this year, including one that blatantly yet beautifully pastiched the iconic Gips/Frankfurt design for Rosemary’s Baby and another in which Jennifer Lawrence’s face is minutely cracked like a porcelain doll. But it is this first teaser poster for the film, by the extraordinary artist James Jean, that stands out for me not only as a surreally appropriate representation of Aronofsky’s uncompromising vision, but as the best movie poster of the year. Grotesque and gorgeous, and dotted with hidden clues, Jean’s looks more like a piece of devotional iconography than a poster for a horror movie. (There is also an accompanying poster by Jean which features Javier Bardem’s character.) Known for his covers for the DC comic book series Fables, Jean has been in high demand this year, creating the charcoal illustration
See full article at MUBI »

Call Me By Your Name leads 2018 Film Independent Spirit Awards nominations

The nominations for the 33rd annual Film Independent Spirit Awards have been announced today, with Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name leading the field with six nominations, followed by Josh Safdie’s Good Time and Jordan Peele’s Get Out with five apiece and Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird with four.

Best Feature

Call Me By Your Name

The Florida Project

Get Out

Lady Bird

The Rider

Best First Feature

Columbus

Ingrid Goes West

Menashe

Oh Lucy!

Patti Cake$

John Cassavetes Award (Given to the best feature made for under $500,000)

Dayveon

A Ghost Story

Life and nothing more

Most Beautiful Island

The Transfiguration

Best Director

Sean Baker, The Florida Project

Jonas Carpignano, A Ciambra

Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name

Jordan Peele, Get Out

Benny and Josh Safdie, Good Time

Chloe Zhao, The Rider

Best Screenplay

Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird

Azazel Jacobs, The Lovers

Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Independent Spirit Awards 2018 Nominations -- See the Full List!

Independent Spirit Awards 2018 Nominations -- See the Full List!
Call Me by Your Name, Get Out and Lady Bird all had great showings at the 2018 Independent Spirit Award nominations!

The nominees were announced on Tuesday morning, with the Armie Hammer-ledCall Me by Your Name leading the pack with six nominations, followed closely by Jordan Peele's critically acclaimed, genre-bending thriller Get Out with five, and Lady Bird, with four.

All three films are competing for Best Picture, along with The Florida Project and The Rider. The Independent Spirit Awards are sometimes seen as a tea leaf for how the Academy Awards will sway -- the Best Picture winner of this show has gone on to also earn the distinction at the Oscars for five out of the last six years.

Peele earned a nod in the Best Director category, and the film's lead, Daniel Kaluuya is up for Best Male Lead, along with James Franco, who is nominated for The Disaster Artist. In the Best Female
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

2018 Independent Spirit Awards Nominations Announced

Awards season is officially a go with one of the first high profile awards nominations being unveiled. The 2018 Independent Spirit Awards nominations have been revealed and Call Me by Your Name, Lady Bird, Get Out and Good Time lead the way.

While these awards are the first to be announced, they are one of the last to be dished out. The Independent Spirit Awards are traditionally dished out the day before the Oscars in Santa Monica, which this season will be on Saturday, March 3 2018.

Get Out

The nominations give us our very first indicator for what may be nominated for the Academy Awards, and last year they famously predicted Casey Affleck would bag Best Actor for Manchester By The Sea, and Moonlight would take Best Picture. Both bagged the Indies the previous day.

Here are this year’s Independent Spirit Awards nominations in full.

Best Feature

Call Me by Your Name
See full article at The Hollywood News »

2018 Independent Spirit Award Nominations: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Dominate

2018 Independent Spirit Award Nominations: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Dominate
The nominations for the 33rd Independent Spirit Awards are in, and “Get Out,” “Call Me by Your Name,” “Lady Bird,” “Good Time,” and more have dominated this year’s slate.

Read More: 2018 Oscar Predictions

Over the last several years, the Indie Spirits have become both a champion of underdog indies (see Molly Shannon winning Best Supporting Female last year for “Other People”) and a key indicator in which films and performances could end up with the Oscar (Casey Affleck and “Moonlight” for Best Picture last year). John Mulaney and Nick Kroll will return to host the 33rd Independent Spirit Awards on Saturday, March 3.

The full nominations list is below.

Best Feature

Call Me by Your Name

The Florida Project

Get Out

Lady Bird

The Rider

Best Director

Jonas Carpignano, “A Ciambra

Luca Guadagnino, “Call Me by Your Name

Jordan Peele, “Get Out

Sean Baker, “The Florida Project

Benny and Josh Safdie,
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Something Wild,’ ‘Beatriz at Dinner,’ ‘Lemon,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

All These Sleepless Nights (Michal Marczak)

Blurring the line between documentary and fiction like few films before it, Michal Marczak‘s All These Sleepless Nights is a music-filled ode to the ever-shifting bliss and angst of youth set mostly in the wee hours of the day in Warsaw, Poland. Marczak himself, who also plays cinematographer, is wary to delineate the line between narrative and nonfiction, and part of the
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017
Dozens of movies are hitting Netflix during the dog days of summer (click here for a complete list), but the sheer variety of new titles can be daunting. Movies are long, time is short, and indecision is brutal, so — in the hopes of helping you out — here are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in August.

7. “Practical Magic” (1998)

Okay, so “Practical Magic” isn’t a “good movie” in the traditional sense…or in any other sense, for that matter. But it’s a perfect Netflix movie, which is another beast entirely. An incredible time capsule — and bottomless gif resource — from an ancient epoch that historians refer to as “1998,” this essential relic tells the story of sisters Sally (Sandra Bullock) and Gillian (Nicole Kidman) Owens, twin witches who are effectively cursed to remain single forever.

Did I mention that it was directed by Griffin Dunne? Did I mention that it was nominated for a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for including a Faith Hill song on the soundtrack? Did I mention that it features a scene in which Dianne Wiest and Stockard Channing use their secret powers to blend alcoholic drinks in order to lubricate a singalong set to Harry Nilsson’s “Put the Lime in the Coconut”? “Practical Magic” was kind of a blip when it first opened, but it would shake our culture to its skeleton if it came out today. A remake feels inevitable, but in the meantime, the original makes for perfect streaming on a lazy August afternoon. Better yet, add it to your queue and swing back once Halloween rolls around.

Begins streaming August 1st.

6. “The Bomb” (2016)

“the bomb” was one of the most exciting, unclassifiable experiences on the festival circuit last year, but the sheer magnitude of the project made it unclear where it might live once it had finished traveling the world, or if it would be possible for the public to see it. Fortunately, the answers to those questions turned out to be “everywhere” and “very.” Here’s IndieWire’s Steve Greene on the 59-minute film into which this enormous piece of experimental art has been newly reshaped:

Read More‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore. Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. Foregoing the usual talking head interviews or explanatory narration, the one piece of connective tissue throughout the film, besides the subject itself, is the film’s score, from Los Angeles electronic minimalist outfit The Acid. Throughout a harrowing parade of images and fleeting moments of whimsy, the droning, pulsating music underneath brings an alternating sense of dread and power.

Begins streaming August 1st.

5. “Cloud Atlas” (2012)

It’s easy to make fun of “Cloud Atlas,” and not just because one of the six characters that Tom Hanks plays is pretty much a live-action Jar Jar Binks. Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis’ cosmically ambitious sci-fi epic is — in its own delirious way — one of the most earnest movies ever made. Adapted from David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, and now something of an obvious precursor to the Wachowskis’ Netflix series “Sense 8,” this symphonic story of spiritual connection spans from 1849 to 2321 in a go-for-broke attempt to crystallize the effects that one life can have on countless others.

Controversially casting individual actors in multiple roles (with many of the film’s most famous stars disguising themselves as different races and genders), “Cloud Atlas” fearlessly envisions our world as a place where bodies are temporary, but love is eternal. It’s a lot to swallow, but our collective cynicism only makes the movie more valuable, and more important to have on hand.

Begins streaming August 1st.

4. “Donald Cried” (2016)

Kris Avedisian flew under the radar when “Donald Cried” made the rounds last year — his self-directed turn as the most deeply committed man-child since “Clifford” may have been just a bit too raw and cringe-inducing for any major traction — but it’s only a matter of time before people discover one of the most fearless performances in recent memory. Here’s IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a future dark comedy classic:

The obnoxious man-child is a common trope in American comedies, but few recent examples can match the hilariously unsettling presence of Donald Treebeck, the obnoxious central figure played by writer-director Kris Avedisian in his effective black comedy “Donald Cried.” While the story technically unfolds from the perspective of his old teen pal Peter (Jesse Wakeman), who returns to their Rhode Island suburbs from his Wall Street career after his grandmother dies, Donald welcomes his reluctant friend back to their world and won’t leave him alone. Avedisian gives Danny McBride a run for his money in this pitch-perfect embodiment of a wannabe charmer all too eager to remain the center of attention. Hardly reinventing the wheel, “Donald Cried” nevertheless spins it faster than usual, taking cues from its memorably irritating protagonist. Beneath its entertainment value, the movie also hints at the tragedy of aimless adulthood.

Begins streaming August 15th.

3. “The Matrix” (1999)

At this point, “The Matrix” has effectively become immune to any sort of qualitative criticism; there’s no use arguing that it’s “good” or “bad” or somewhere in between, it simply is. Less a movie than a cornerstone of contemporary pop culture (for better or worse), the Wachowskis’ absurdly influential orgy of mind-blowing action and high school philosophy arrived at the tail end of the 20th century in order to help define the 21st. Its aesthetic impact on the current breed of blockbusters is self-evident, but its more profound contributions have been largely off-screen, as the film brought futurism to the masses in a way that’s only possible to trace through its most unfortunate side effects (e.g. the diseased misogyny of “red pill” thinking).

Of course, “No can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.” Now that it’s on Netflix, it couldn’t be easier to do just that.

Begins streaming August 1st.

2. “Jackie Brown” (1997)

Every hardcore Tarantino fan’s favorite Tarantino film, “Jackie Brown” is more than just an homage to blaxploitation or the best Elmore Leonard adaptation ever made (sorry, “Out of Sight”), it’s also something of a tribute to all of the crime writer’s work and the scuzzy but soulful ethos that bound it together. To this day, “Jackie Brown” remains a major outlier for Qt. For one thing, it’s based on pre-existing material. For another, it’s got a bonafide sex scene. Last but not least, it’s about recognizably human characters who have genuine depth, who have real lives that feel as though they continue beyond the confines of a movie screen (no disrespect to the cartoonish avatars who populate Tarantino’s later, more solipsistic work — they serve their purpose to perfection).

Pam Grier is spectacular in the title role of a flight attendant with a drug smuggling side hustle. Robert Forster is heartbreaking as lovelorn bondsman Max Cherry. Hell, even Robert De Niro is phenomenal, the iconic actor beautifully playing against his legend by inhabiting the film’s most pathetic and disposable character. For anyone put off by the blockbuster scale of Tarantino’s recent work, “Jackie Brown” is a rock-solid reminder of his genius for elevating fevered pastiche into singular pathos. And the soundtrack owns.

Begins streaming August 1st.

1. “All These Sleepless Nights” (2016)

It would be reductive and unfair to say that Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” is the film that Terrence Malick has been trying to make for the last 10 years, but it certainly feels that way while you’re watching it. A mesmeric, free-floating odyssey that wends its way through a hazy year in the molten lives of two Polish twentysomethings, this unclassifiable wonder obscures the divide between fiction and documentary until the distinction is ultimately irrelevant.

Read MoreReview: ‘All These Sleepless Nights’ Is the Movie That Terrence Malick Has Been Trying to Make

Unfolding like a plotless reality show that was shot by Emmanuel Lubezki, this lucid dream of a movie paints an unmoored portrait of a city in the throes of an orgastic reawakening. From the opening images of fireworks exploding over downtown Warsaw, to the stunning final glimpse of Marczak’s main subject — Krzysztof Baginski (playing himself, as everyone does), who looks and moves like a young Baryshnikov — twirling between an endless row of stopped cars during the middle of a massive traffic jam, the film is high on the spirit of liberation. More than just a hypnotically hyper-real distillation of what it means to be young, “All These Sleepless Nights” is a haunted vision of what it means to have been young.

Begins streaming August 15th.

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See full article at Indiewire »

9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’

9 Films New to Netflix to Watch in August 2017, Including ‘The Matrix’ Trilogy and ‘Jackie Brown’
Netflix may have cancelled the Wachowski’s cult hit “Sense 8,” but its adding two of their defining works to its streaming library next month. All three entries in “The Matrix” trilogy are heading to Netflix, as is the ambitious “Cloud Atlas,” which means you’ll be able to bring summer to an end by bingeing mind-melting science fiction.

Read More: Netflix Is Not the Problem: Why Bad Theatrical Presentations Are Destroying the Experience

Other titles joining the streaming service include underrated gems from Quentin Tarantino and Michael Haneke, plus two of the year’s most exciting documentary films. Check out a complete list of all the new movies joining Netflix in August 2017 below, including our 7 must-binge choices.

The Matrix” Trilogy (August 1)

August kicks off with “The Matrix,” “The Matrix Reloaded” and “The Matrix Revolutions” all becoming available to stream on Netflix. Say what you want about the two sequels, but
See full article at Indiewire »

The 17 Best Indie Movies of 2017 (So Far)

  • Indiewire
The 17 Best Indie Movies of 2017 (So Far)
Yes, we know: It’s a little premature to assemble a list of the best movies of the year when there’s so much left of it. We have yet to see a lot of exciting new work from major auteurs like Christopher Nolan (“Dunkirk”), Alexander Payne (“Downsizing”), and Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), not to mention heavy-hitting studio-produced spectacles like “Blade Runner 2049” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” But those last two wouldn’t even qualify for this list of the best independent films of the year, anyway, and they’ll have plenty of time to hog the spotlight.

Fortunately, we’ve found plenty of movies from around the world to celebrate, and while they haven’t all been box office sensations, they provide overwhelming evidence that the art form is thriving well into the second decade of the new millennium, and shows no signs of slowing down.
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Zodiac,’ ‘Dressed to Kill,’ ‘A Cure for Wellness,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

A Cure for Wellness (Gore Verbinski)

The asylum-based film is a fairly interesting mini-genre to deconstruct. These movies almost always deal with perceptions of reality, questions of the self, and an innate fear of those in positions of power who operate in worlds of the ethereal. The question of the protagonist’s madness is almost always central, and the uncertainty over whether their paranoia is unfounded or justified is
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Movies of 2017 So Far According to IndieWire

The Best Movies of 2017 So Far According to IndieWire
It may seem like there are only certain times of the year when the movies are worth watching, but the reality is that quality cinema hits theaters and VOD platforms all year round. We haven’t reached the halfway mark in 2017 yet, there are already dozens of quality new releases, many of which will continue to deserve singling out by the end of the year. IndieWire’s film team has seen a lot of them. The following ranked list was developed out of the aggregate scores from top 10 lists contributed by film writers in New York and Los Angeles. In order to qualify, a movie must have either received a theatrical release in 2017 or become available on a VOD platform during that time. Movies that received awards-qualifying runs in 2016 do not count. In many cases, multiple films tied for votes and are designated as such.

Take a look at our list below,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Personal Shopper’ Tops New Openers, and ‘A Very Sordid Wedding’ Shines

One year ago, the post-Oscar specialized rebound began with the release of “Eye in the Sky” and “Hello, My Name Is Doris.” Each opened with per-theater averages over $20,000; then, with support from older audiences all across the country, made $19 million and $14 million, respectively.

This year it’s “Personal Shopper,” with the French film starring Kristen Stewart showing unexpected interest. “Raw” (Focus) and “A Sense of the Ending” (Lionsgate) also managed PTAs over $10,000, indicating some chance for future success.

Ahead of any other new release in PTA was a single theater, premiere-event boosted initial date for “A Very Sordid Wedding” in Palm Springs. This week also saw the very limited opening of “Burning Sands,” the second film in the Sundance 2017 U.S. dramatic competition to find its home on Netflix. As usual, no gross for this, which is sort of beside the point.

Opening

Personal Shopper (IFC) – Metacritic: 77; Festivals include: Cannes,
See full article at Indiewire »

Logan Crushes the Weekend Box Office with $85.3M

Logan Crushes the Weekend Box Office with $85.3M
With a massive amount of critical acclaim at its back, 20th Century Fox's Logan was poised to come away with an easy box office win. Early box office projections put Logan between $60 million and $70 million, but like most box office hits, it opened above and beyond its expectations. The box office estimates started rolling in today, with the superhero adventure taking in $85.3 million, easily beating fellow newcomers The Shack and Before I Fall. Last weekend's winner Get Out also proved that it has some staying power, dropping just 21.8%, coming in second place with $26.1 million

Logan is currently at 93% on Rotten Tomatoes, with 83 positive reviews and just four negative reviews, with Before I Fall also faring well with critics with 64% on Rt, although The Shack failed to win over the critics with 16% on Rt. As far as opening weekend rollout, Logan, featuring Hugh Jackman's final performance as Wolverine, is opening in 4,071 theaters this weekend,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Table 19’ Leads Weak Post-Oscar Field

The week after the Oscars, most of the contenders are moving on to home viewing. It was a terrific season, but the market needs strong new entries to stem the box-office slide.

Neither of this week’s two most prominent releases — “Table 19” with a national Fox Searchlight break and “The Last Word” (Bleecker Street) — will bolster box office. It also doesn’t help that two highly-touted and well-reviewed wide release studio films, Fox’s “Logan” and Universal’s “Get Out,” are competing for many of the same viewers.

A series of smaller niche audience releases remain. And four this weekend are either Israeli or aimed at audiences interested in Jewish topics. Led by “Women in the Balcony” (Menemsha) they could see further life over the next several weeks.

Opening

Table 19 (Fox Searchlight) – Metacritic: 38

$1,575,000 in 868 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $1,815

Fox Searchlight opted to take this poorly-reviewed wedding
See full article at Indiewire »

How Danny McBride, David Gordon Green, and Jody Hill Are Revolutionizing American Comedy and Beyond

How Danny McBride, David Gordon Green, and Jody Hill Are Revolutionizing American Comedy and Beyond
Audiences may not realize it, but Rough House Pictures has been a pivotal force in American filmmaking over the past decade.

People know Danny McBride as the snarky, self-aggrandizing star of HBO’s “Eastbound and Down” and “Vice Principals,” shows he created with fellow North Carolina School of the Arts alumni Jody Hill and David Gordon Green. But while McBride’s is the most public face, all three men have become influential figures in the film industry.

Green and McBride are writing the Blumhouse reboot of “Halloween,” while Hill is finishing his third film, a comedy starring Josh Brolin. Green has oscillated from the quiet, Southern gothic tales of “George Washington” and “All the Real Girls” to boisterous comedies like “Pineapple Express.” Hill’s debut, “Foot Fist Way,” got the attention of Will Ferrell and Adam McKay, who launched Hill’s TV career and gave him the momentum to direct his first studio film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Mended Bond: Kris Avedisian and Jesse Wakeman on the Unpleasant Fraternity in Donald Cried

Lacking appropriate words, forcing an uncomfortable embrace and remembering once-forgotten regrets are common symptoms during a chance encounter with an old friend who, through the passage of time and often distance, has become little more than a stranger. Once that unexpected moment ends, most people return to their everyday routine, but what if, because of uncontrollable circumstances, one had to actually spend the day in the company of that somebody you used to know? Debutant Kris Avedisian sets his feature Donald Cried, in which he also stars as the title character, around such possibility and charges it with unbearably cringe-worthy […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Donald Cried’ Is A Wistful, Hilarious Look At A Forgotten Friendship [Review]

Fewer narratives are as played out as the prickish-man-returns-home-and-bumps-into-childhood-friend-who-never-left-and-learns-to-embrace-his-past arc. It’s about as formulaic as they come. The characters are stock, the conflict is familiar, and the overall journey is the same. Of course, the reason it’s so familiar, that directors and writers keep going back there, is because it can work, and the conceit embodies a pervasive set of familiar fears: Who hasn’t wanted to flee from the small town where they grew up?

Continue reading ‘Donald Cried’ Is A Wistful, Hilarious Look At A Forgotten Friendship [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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