6.9/10
4,928
44 user 45 critic

Bomb City (2017)

TV-MA | | Crime, Drama | 31 March 2017 (USA)
Trailer
1:48 | Trailer

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ALL
A crime-drama, about the cultural aversion of a group of punk rockers in a conservative Texas town. Their ongoing battle with a rival, more-affluent clique leads to a controversial hate crime that questions the morality of American justice.

Director:

Jameson Brooks (as Jamie Brooks)

Writers:

Jameson Brooks (as Jamie Brooks), Sheldon Chick
Reviews
Popularity
1,597 ( 4,301)
11 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dave Davis ... Brian
Glenn Morshower ... Cameron Wilson
Logan Huffman ... Ricky
Lorelei Linklater ... Rome
Eddie Hassell ... Oles
Henry Knotts ... King
Dominic Ryan Gabriel ... Jason
Luke Shelton ... Cody Cates
Maemae Renfrow ... Jade
Michael Seitz ... Davis
Lukas Termin Lukas Termin ... McCormick
Audrey Gerthoffer Audrey Gerthoffer ... Michelle
Major Dodge ... Officer Denny
Robbie Lawler Robbie Lawler ... Officer Vincent
Marilyn Manson ... Himself
Edit

Storyline

Bomb City is a crime-drama, about the cultural aversion of a group of punk rockers in a conservative Texas town. Their ongoing battle with a rival, more-affluent clique leads to a controversial hate crime that questions the morality of American justice. Based on the true story of Brian Deneke.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The more I see of man, the more I like dogs.

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Site | Official Site | See more »

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

31 March 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Город-бомба See more »

Filming Locations:

Dallas, Texas, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$31,005, 11 February 2018, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$59,329, 8 April 2018
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Based on a true story. See more »

Soundtracks

Human Error
Performed by Subhumans
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
have we progressed in 20 years?
7 February 2018 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. This feature film debut from Texas filmmaker Jameson Brooks (co-written with Sheldon Chick) was an Audience Award winner at last year's Dallas International Film Festival. It's based on the incredulous true story of a tragic crime and the subsequent trial that occurred in Amarillo in the late 1990's. It's also an introduction to a talented and exciting filmmaker with a message that is as every bit as important now for every community as it was 20 years ago in the Texas panhandle.

The courtroom scenes serve as the story structure while flashbacks are blended with the defense attorney (Glenn Morshower) commenting/mocking the evidence as it's shown to the jury. This style keeps those unfamiliar with the story uncertain as to the actual victim and the circumstances of the crime - at least until the final act when we see a re-enactment of the crime and the final day of trial. However, even if one is familiar with the specifics of the case, it is presented in such an exceptional manner that it will surely be just as impactful.

Keeping in mind that this is west Texas (remember "Friday Night Lights") and football reigns supreme, so the ongoing battle between the Punks and the Preps sets the stage for ultimate cultural battle ... especially in an area that is home to a nuclear bomb assembly plant. Volatility abounds. There is a terrific sequence with parallel cuts between the mosh pit of a local punk rock concert and the on-field violence of a local high school football game. There are more similarities than differences, well, until the kids from the two sides cross paths in the real world. Class differences are obvious, and so is the usual teen angst and rebellious nature.

Distinct differences in how the authorities handle each group's form of release are on full display. The punks are caught tagging, while the pasture party of the jocks gains frenzy. One of these ends with handcuffs, and the other with polite dismissal. The core of the story is the ongoing comparison between Brian (in a wonderful performance from Dave Davies), sporting a colorful Mohawk as he skateboards through town, and Cody (an effective Luke Shelton), a buttoned-up football player always striving to prove his mettle as he cruises around town in Daddy's Cadillac. A sense of doom-filled destiny accompanies their scenes, and of course, we know it won't end well.

Many will find the film reminiscent of Frances Ford Coppola's 1983 film THE OUTSIDERS, which featured the Greasers versus the Socs. The biting realism and grit of Mr. Brooks' film helps us better understand the similarities between the two groups who look so different. And that's the real message here: judging others by looks will never lead to understanding and peaceful coexistence. The cinematography of Jake Wilgonwski is a huge part of the emotional reaction we have to this story, and the notes provided at the end of the film leave us wondering if, 20 plus years later, we are any more advanced as a society than what occurred in that Amarillo parking lot.


29 of 47 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 44 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Comedy Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular comedy titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed