After a casual encounter, a brokenhearted woman decides to confront her life and the most important events about her stranded daughter.

Director:

Pedro Almodóvar

Writers:

Pedro Almodóvar, Alice Munro (basado en "Destino", "Pronto" y "Silencio" de)
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 15 wins & 62 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Emma Suárez ... Julieta
Adriana Ugarte ... Julieta Joven
Daniel Grao ... Xoan
Inma Cuesta ... Ava
Darío Grandinetti ... Lorenzo (as Dario Grandinetti)
Michelle Jenner ... Beatriz
Pilar Castro ... Claudia (Madre de Beatriz)
Nathalie Poza ... Juana
Susi Sánchez ... Sara (Madre de Julieta)
Joaquín Notario ... Samuel (Padre de Julieta)
Priscilla Delgado ... Antía (Adolescente)
Blanca Parés Blanca Parés ... Antía (18 años)
Ariadna Martín Ariadna Martín
Rossy de Palma ... Marian
Sara Jiménez ... Beatriz (Adolescente)
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Storyline

Julieta (Emma Suarez) is a middle-aged woman living in Madrid with her boyfriend Lorenzo. Both are going to move to Portugal when she casually runs into Bea, former best friend of her daughter Antia, who reveals that this one is living in Switzerland married and with three children. With the heart broken after 12 years of total absence of her daughter, Julieta cancels the journey to Portugal and she moves to her former building, in the hope that Antia someday communicates with her sending a letter. Alone with her thoughts, Julieta starts to write her memories to confront the pain of the events happened when she was a teenager (Adriana Ugarte) and met Xoan, a Galician fisherman. Falling in love with him, Julieta divides her time between the family, the job and the education of Antia until a fatal accident changes their lives. Slowly decaying in a depression, Julieta is helped by Antia and Bea, but one day Antia goes missing suddenly after a vacation with no clues about where to find ... Written by Chockys

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Mystery | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Almost every shot contains the red color. See more »

Goofs

When the train does an emergency brake and luggage and people are being tossed all over the place a coffee cup and coffee pot in front of the main character remains undisturbed. See more »

Connections

References Le Havre (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Playing the Piano 2009
Written and Performed by Ryuichi Sakamoto
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User Reviews

 
a darkly sensitive essay about the universal emotion of maternal guilt
30 October 2016 | by CineMuseFilmsSee all my reviews

You may enjoy Julieta (2016) more if you know that it is a women's film from the melodrama genre and a story of pure emotion. While it is labelled a romance it is nothing like a romance and don't expect light entertainment or laughs as the film is devoid of humour. What is does have is an outpouring of quintessentially maternal guilt and self-absorbed loss that is palpable throughout the film. While critics may be divided, this is a beautiful film with a long aftertaste.

We meet the attractive widow Julieta just as she is packing to leave Madrid and move with her boyfriend to Portugal. Madrid is full of painful memories, the most intense of which is not seeing her daughter Antia for twelve years. A chance encounter with her daughter's former best friend opens an uncontrollable torrent of guilt which suddenly fills Julieta's life. Abandoning her boyfriend, she decides to stay in Madrid in case Antia ever looks for her. Unable to deal with her grief in any other way, she writes the story of her life as if she is talking to her absent daughter.

Julieta narrates the story in chapters that become extended flashbacks to her early romance with Antia's father, their lives together as a family and its eventual disintegration. What was once a life full of loving relationships becomes one of multiple losses even though Julieta herself bears little blame for the tragedies. Julieta is unaware how deeply her daughter was affected by what happened and is bewildered when Antia searches for spirituality at a Swiss retreat. Her sudden disappearance without explanation has left her mother with unresolved grief.

As each chapter unfolds we see the larger portrait of the mother and daughter relationship in all its dense complexity and destructive power. The narrative teasingly denies us knowledge of why Antia refuses all contact with her mother, and year after year Julieta mourns each passing birthday as if it was a funeral. The storytelling intensity is sustained by finely nuanced acting from the two stars who play the younger and older Julieta, and those who play Antia at different ages. The camera-work has a melancholic sensitivity that resonates with the Spanish landscapes and urban settings, and while the story unwinds slowly, to tell it more quickly would lose depth and meaning. Julieta is a darkly sensitive essay about the universal emotion of maternal guilt and its melancholy lifts like a rising fog with a masterfully ambivalent ending that soars.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Spain

Language:

Spanish

Release Date:

21 December 2016 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Julieta See more »

Filming Locations:

Madrid, Spain See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

EUR1,350,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$64,044, 25 December 2016

Gross USA:

$1,490,948

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$22,546,233
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

SDDS | Dolby Digital | Datasat

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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