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The Founder (2016)

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The story of Ray Kroc, a salesman who turned two brothers' innovative fast food eatery, McDonald's, into the biggest restaurant business in the world, with a combination of ambition, persistence, and ruthlessness.

Director:

John Lee Hancock

Writer:

Robert Siegel
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Popularity
1,567 ( 96)
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Keaton ... Ray Kroc
Nick Offerman ... Dick McDonald
John Carroll Lynch ... Mac McDonald
Linda Cardellini ... Joan Smith
B.J. Novak ... Harry J. Sonneborn
Laura Dern ... Ethel Kroc
Justin Randell Brooke ... Fred Turner
Kate Kneeland ... June Martino
Patrick Wilson ... Rollie Smith
Griff Furst ... Jim Zien
Wilbur Fitzgerald ... Jerry Cullen
David de Vries ... Jack Horford
Andrew Benator ... Leonard Rosenblatt
Cara Mantella ... Myra Rosenblatt
Randall Taylor ... Owner (Ed's Drive-In)
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Storyline

1954. Having worked as a salesman most of his adult life, Ray Kroc has been a hustler in most senses of the word. That hustling has made him the target of derision among certain circles for peddling what have ended up being more novelty or faddish than useful products, but it has also placed more than a comfortable roof in Arlington Heights, Illinois over his and his wife Ethel's heads. Ethel, however, wishes that he placed as much effort into being at home with her than he is in selling, his current job of peddling five-spindle milkshake makers for Prince Castle which has him constantly on the road going from one drive-in restaurant to another. It is because of the beefs he has with the whole drive-in experience (bad food, bad service) in constantly eating at such establishments while on the road that he becomes enthralled with the concept of McDonald's Restaurant in San Bernardino, California, it owned and operated by brothers Richard McDonald and Maurice McDonald - Dick and Mac. ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In the world of business, it's founders keepers. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Yiddish

Release Date:

20 January 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Hambre de poder See more »

Filming Locations:

Atlanta, Georgia, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,404,102, 22 January 2017, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$12,785,093, 21 April 2017

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$21,945,747
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Much of the content of "The Power Of The Positive" record by fictional author Dr. Clarence Floyd Nelson in the film, is borrowed from a real motivational recording from that era by Earl Nightingale called "The Strangest Secret". See more »

Goofs

When Ray is in the hotel and starts playing the motivational record, about 30 seconds or so goes by. Then the camera tilts down to show the needle almost in the middle of the record. It would have been very close to the outer edge in that short time. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Ray Kroc: I know what you're thinkin'... What the heck do I need a 5-spindle for... when I barely sell enough milkshakes to justify my single-spindle. Right? Wrong. Are you familiar with the notion of the chicken or the egg Mr. Griffith, I mentioned... that there'd be costs. Well, I think it applies here. Do you not need the multimixer because, well heck, you're not selling enough milkshakes. Or are you not selling enough milkshakes because you don't have a multimixer? I firmly believe it's ...
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Crazy Credits

During the opening/closing credits, the real Ray A Kroc is heard giving an interview about how he came to buy out McDonald's. See more »


Soundtracks

Truffle Corn
Written by Jim Cox, Steve Lindsey
Performed by The Troubled Teenagers
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User Reviews

 
Kroc took their lunch money
19 January 2017 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. How you define success will likely determine your interpretation of this film that is every bit as much about the humble beginnings and explosive growth of McDonalds as it is a biopic of Ray Kroc, the self-professed "founder" of the golden arches empire. Capitalism and its corresponding businessmen have not typically been favorably portrayed by Hollywood in such films as The Social Network, Wall Street, Glengarry Glen Ross, Steve Jobs and The Wolf of Wall Street. This latest from director John Lee Hancock (Saving Mr. Banks, The Blind Side) and writer Robert Siegel (The Wrestler) is no exception, and it's obvious why.

It's 1954 when we first catch up with Ray Kroc (as played by Michael Keaton). He's the type of travelling salesman who totes around his latest widget (a multiple milkshake machine), rehearses and polishes his spiel (via extreme close-up), and listens to motivational record albums that preach the importance of persistence, while he stays at roadside motels that act as his home away from home. Kroc doggedly pursues the American dream, and optimistically bounces from one project to another … convinced that he's found "the next big thing".

When circumstance leads him to a crowded little octagonal burger shop in San Bernardino, Kroc becomes fascinated with its simplicity and success. Over dinner, Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac (John Carroll Lynch) McDonald detail the Spee-Dee kitchen design and unique focus on quality, consistency and speed that today is considered the starting line of the fast-food industry. The tennis court sequence is especially creative and fun to watch. While the brothers prefer to keep the business small and remain in control, Kroc pitches his vision of franchising … a pitch with emphasis on "Crosses. Flags. Arches".

The full story is likely one most people don't know … despite the fact that McDonalds now feeds 1% of the world population each day (a statistic posted on screen). The relationship between Kroc and the McDonald brothers was never a smooth one, and it's a perfect example of dog-eat-dog, or unprincipled vs idealistic. Kroc sees himself as a "winner", while it's likely most will view his actions as unscrupulous, even if legal.

Keaton's performance accurately captures a man who is impatiently ambitious, and whose confidence and ego grow incrementally as it becomes inevitable that the decency of the brothers is actually a weakness in business. Offerman and Lynch are both excellent, and other support work is provided by Laura Dern as Kroc's first and mostly neglected wife who is tossed aside when something better comes along; BJ Novak as Harry J Sonneborn, the key to Kroc's power move; Justin Randell Brooks as Fred Turner and Kate Kneeland as June Martino, two trusted employees; and Patrick Wilson as a key franchisee. Linda Cardellini (Mad Men, Bloodline) plays Joan, Ray's wife (she was actually his third) and business adviser from 1969 until his death in 1984. The film shortchanges her importance – at least until the closing credit recap.

Bookending that opening extreme close-up sales pitch, is a near-conclusion zoom on Keaton's face as he prepares for an event where he will tell his story … at least his version of the story. The film does a really nice job of capturing the era. Of particular interest is that the cars don't look like they rolled right out of a classic car show, as happens with most movies. It's nice to see some faded paint and a dented fender on screen. The early McDonalds locations are beautifully and realistically replicated to provide a nostalgic look for some, and a first glimpse for others. Carter Burwell's score is complementary to the proceedings, and director Hancock deserves credit for not just making this the Michael Keaton/Ray Kroc show. Rather than serving up a Happy Meal movie, the film instead provides a somewhat toned-down historical view of ambition and drive, and the birth of an empire … one that changed our culture.


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