7.2/10
923
3 user 32 critic

Nebel im August (2016)

Trailer
2:22 | Trailer
A Roma boy is placed in a mental hospital and experiences the Nazi euthanasia program. Aware of what was happening and attached to friends, the lad attempts to sabotage the program. The ... See full summary »

Director:

Kai Wessel

Writers:

Holger Karsten Schmidt (screenplay), Robert Domes (novel)
Reviews
7 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Ivo Pietzcker ... Ernst Lossa
Sebastian Koch ... Dr. Werner Veithausen
Thomas Schubert ... Paul Hechtle
Fritzi Haberlandt ... Oberschwester Sophia
Henriette Confurius Henriette Confurius ... Edith Kiefer
Branko Samarovski Branko Samarovski ... Max Witt
David Bennent ... Oja
Jule Hermann Jule Hermann ... Nandl
Niklas Post Niklas Post ... Josef
Karl Markovics ... Christian Lossa
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Patrick Heyn Patrick Heyn ... Nazi
Lyonel Hollaender Lyonel Hollaender ... Christoph
Juls Serger Juls Serger ... Hermann Klein
Franziska Singer ... Frau Klein
Arne Wichert Arne Wichert ... Toni
Edit

Storyline

A Roma boy is placed in a mental hospital and experiences the Nazi euthanasia program. Aware of what was happening and attached to friends, the lad attempts to sabotage the program. The film addresses the complexities of the program director, the lives of the child victims, and the struggles of the child protagonist. More than five thousand children were killed in the Nazi euthanasia program. Written by drsandivaughan

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Germany

Release Date:

29 September 2016 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

Agustosta Sis See more »

Filming Locations:

Germany See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The best German film on the subject...
27 August 2017 | by Radu_ASee all my reviews

... given that German films on the subject usually let you feel somewhat detached. Whenever the Holocaust is concerned, German filmmakers tend to try to do everything according to the book, as meticulously factual as possible, so viewers can easily feel lectured.

There is a good deal of that strife for perfection in here as well, as a whole lot of neglected issues are crammed into this one film: the Nazi euthanasia program involving feeding patients nutrition-less food called "Ersatzkost", substitute nourishment. The silent acquiescence of the Catholic church to mass murder carried out in institutions under their formal patronage. The lumping together of all kinds of "undesirables" labeled mentally unfit to live. And in the guise of the lead, the still unfilmed "Porrajmos" (which means "devouring"), the destruction of much of Europe's Romani population no one cares about until today.

It's all a bit much and doesn't help the narrative structure, but there is a lot to learn, even for those who've seen a good deal of films about the subject. Apart from "Schindler's List", hardly any film explains the ideology and motivation behind these crimes. The extremely fascinating - while sickening - quality of this film is that it shows doctors and nurses murdering children without any malice, all in the name of the "greater cause" of racial purity. As incredibly inhumane this seems to the viewer - and the sole heroine of the story, a catholic nun - the sources from that time indicate that this was indeed how the culprits thought. Sebastian Koch, whom I usually find rather wooden, brings this uncanny mix of "scientific" curiosity and complete lack of conscience perfectly across. It's his best film, better than "The Lives of Others".

What this film is not is the heavily overdue film about the persecution of gypsies. It's misleading to call the protagonist Ernst Lossa a Rom, he was a Jenische, they are non-ethnic travellers like in Ireland and don't speak Romanes. They mostly reside in Switzerland, where Jenische children were taken away from their families to "socialize" them until 1968... as you see, there remain many, many more stories to tell.


5 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed