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Mustang (2015)

PG-13 | | Drama | 17 June 2015 (France)
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When five orphan girls are seen innocently playing with boys on a beach, their scandalized conservative guardians confine them while forced marriages are arranged.
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4,062 ( 353)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 44 wins & 59 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Günes Sensoy Günes Sensoy ... Lale (as Günes Nezihe Sensoy)
Doga Zeynep Doguslu Doga Zeynep Doguslu ... Nur
Tugba Sunguroglu Tugba Sunguroglu ... Selma
Elit Iscan Elit Iscan ... Ece
Ilayda Akdogan Ilayda Akdogan ... Sonay
Nihal G. Koldas Nihal G. Koldas ... The Grandmother (as Nihal Koldas)
Ayberk Pekcan Ayberk Pekcan ... Erol
Bahar Kerimoglu Bahar Kerimoglu ... Dilek
Burak Yigit Burak Yigit ... Yasin
Erol Afsin ... Osman
Suzanne Marrot Suzanne Marrot ... Aunt Hanife
Serife Kara Serife Kara ... The Great-Aunt
Aynur Komecoglu Aynur Komecoglu ... Aunt Emine
Sevval Aydin Sevval Aydin ... Erin
Enes Sürüm Enes Sürüm ... Ekin
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Storyline

Early summer. In a village in northern Turkey, Lale and her four sisters are walking home from school, playing innocently with some boys. The immorality of their play sets off a scandal that has unexpected consequences. The family home is progressively transformed into a prison; instruction in homemaking replaces school and marriages start being arranged. The five sisters who share a common passion for freedom, find ways of getting around the constraints imposed on them. Written by Festival de Cannes

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Their spirit would never be broken

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material, sexual content and a rude gesture | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Turkey | France | Germany | Qatar

Language:

Turkish

Release Date:

17 June 2015 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Mustang: Belleza salvaje See more »

Filming Locations:

Inebolu, Kastamonu, Turkey See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

€1,300,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,151, 22 November 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$845,464

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,915,624
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital (as Dolby 5.1)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Swiss visa # 1010.940. See more »

Goofs

The girls want to go to the Galatasaray-Trabzon match. They say to Yasin that they need to go to Trabzon. However, later when we see them on TV, the score shows Galatasaray's (GS) name first which means the match is in Istanbul not in Trabzon. See more »

Quotes

Selma: I slept with the entire world.
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Connections

Featured in 73rd Golden Globe Awards (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Hopce
Written by Anonymous / Murat Ertel, Levent Akman
Performed by Baba Zula
© Gulbaba Music
(p) 2010 Pozitif Müzik Yapim
Label: Doublemoon Records / www.doublemoon.com.tr
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User Reviews

Girls will be girls except when they can't.
13 January 2016 | by jdesandoSee all my reviews

"If they are sullied it is your fault!" Dad to Grandma in a religiously-conservative Turkish household.

Five beautiful Turkish sisters in the exquisite film, Mustang, endure torture sometimes mentally unbearable (for them and the audience) as they suffer the consequences of playing innocently in the sea with a few lads. Grandma, as you can see in the quote above, suffers as she wrestles with the old against the new.

While I have heard that around the world conservatism can be unfair to women, this Turkish setup is both realistic and unreal at the same time: Marrying off young women as a way of curbing their youthful vigor—strict but effective in a conservative world where virginity before marriage is a necessity and non-virginity a death sentence, at least metaphoric and sometimes literal, I fear. A scene in the hospital checking a girl's virginity after her honeymoon is disturbing.

Writer/director Deniz Gamze Erguven and writer Alice Winocour have crafted a story for the ages about how women continue at the hands of patriarchs and the establishment to suffer the loss of freedoms we take for granted. Pre-teen Lale (Gunes Sensoy) witnesses the steady peeling off of her sisters for marriage while she plots an exit she hopes will scale the iron gates and gratings her Uncle has constructed to short-circuit their rampant joie-de-vivre.

It's not so much the realism (but unreal beautiful girls—now, come on casting, do they have to be that good looking? Hey, wait, my 5 daughters were!). That bit of implausibility is neutralized by a sense of conservative Turkish life as accurately showing the prisons young women can inhabit, called home. Each occurrence of sisters' showing spunk or plain life seems countered by old women steering them into lives of virtue, namely serving men.

Yet, girls will not easily be contained: Young Lale secretly learns how to drive in order one day to bolt to liberal Istanbul. The film balances this rebellion against the girls' increasing imprisonment. Although some might liken the Mustang girls to the five Lisbon sisters of Sofia Coppola's The Virgin Suicides, the difference is in the cultures: The Lisbon sisters were living some of the dream, and the Mustang girls never had it at all.

Then there is my favorite Australian film, Picnic at Hanging Rock, in which school girls vanish into the rock. That's probably figurative for the evanishing innocence of teenage girls but more probably how some cultures are hell bent on making women just fade away.


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