Newsroom drama detailing the 2004 CBS 60 Minutes report investigating then-President George W. Bush's military service, and the subsequent firestorm of criticism that cost anchor Dan Rather and producer Mary Mapes their careers.

Director:

James Vanderbilt

Writers:

James Vanderbilt (screenplay), Mary Mapes (book)
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Cate Blanchett ... Mary Mapes
Robert Redford ... Dan Rather
Topher Grace ... Mike Smith
Dennis Quaid ... Lt. Col. Roger Charles
Elisabeth Moss ... Lucy Scott
Bruce Greenwood ... Andrew Heyward
Stacy Keach ... Lt. Col. Bill Burkett
John Benjamin Hickey ... Mark Wrolstad
David Lyons ... Josh Howard
Dermot Mulroney ... Lawrence Lanpher
Rachael Blake ... Betsy West
Andrew McFarlane ... Dick Hibey
Natalie Saleeba ... Mary Murphy
Noni Hazlehurst ... Nicki Burkett
Connor Burke Connor Burke ... Robert Mapes
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Storyline

The story of The Killian Documents controversy (a.k.a. "Rathergate") in the days leading up to the 2004 presidential election. When veteran newscaster Dan Rather and CBS News head Mary Mapes choose to air a segment on 60 Minutes exposing how President Bush avoided being drafted to Vietnam through his father's political advantages, the resulting fallout ultimately costs them their jobs and reputations. Written by Connor Smith

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

When Truth becomes your downfall.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and a brief nude photo | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film had been in development since 2007. See more »

Goofs

After Bill Burkett's filmed interview, the 60 Minutes team pass round a bag of Lay's potato chips. Throughout the scene this changes position; sometimes it's shown facing the front, and then suddenly it's facing the other way when the scene is shown from a different angle. See more »

Quotes

Mike Smith: Hey, I never got to ask you. Why did you get into journalism?
Dan Rather: Curiosity.
Mike Smith: That's it?
Dan Rather: That's everything. Why did you get into?
Mike Smith: You.
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Crazy Credits

William Devane as The voice of Gen. Hodges on the telephone is not listed in the cast. See more »

Connections

Featured in Close Up with the Hollywood Reporter: Actresses (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

For Sheila
Written by Kenny Werner
Courtesy of Extreme Music
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User Reviews

Like All the President's Men, it's a riveting story.
28 October 2015 | by jdesandoSee all my reviews

"Absolute truth is a very rare and dangerous commodity in the context of professional journalism." Hunter S. Thompson

Every journalism student should see Truth, a true version of a true event that included liberal CBS; liberal anchor, Dan Rather (Robert Redford); and liberal producer for 60 minutes, Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett). The latter two sacrificed their jobs possibly for the ideal of bringing down George W. Bush in his campaign to become president for the second time.

The journalists thought they had a story about Bush slacking in his National Guard tour, but what they had was forged documents that eventually cost them their jobs and credibility. Mapes was the prime agent of the fiasco, pushing to get a story on 60 Minutes when it was too close to deadline and more substantiation was needed for the source and his documents.

First-time director and seasoned-writer James Vanderbilt takes an almost cool approach, not quite as weighty as All the President's Men or as frenetic; the journalists young and old struggle with the profession's verity: Vet your stories and your sources until they bleed truth. Mapes and her vigilantes are up against a deadline, so more verifying of documents and sources is not possible. Thus, they should not have run with the story, but they did. Dan Rather, for all his experience as CBS news anchor, should not have trusted in Mapes' research, but he did.

Most of all they should not have trusted Lt. Colonel Bill Burkett (Stacy Keach), who provided the documents purporting to show Bush's slacking. Because Burkett was a known liar and fervent Kerry supporter, no one should have trusted him before corroborating his information. Journalism students, beware of cutting corners on the road to truth. The film is an excellent primer on best practices.

Truth is a classy, almost unbiased rendition of a true story, an entertaining thriller filled with first-rate actors. If there is one flaw, I submit for your consideration that the film is too reverent of Mapes and Rather, who made a blunder unworthy of their status and experience. They are more heroic than they deserve. As cautionary players on the big media stage, they are the finest examples of flawed human beings.

"I think journalism gets measured by the quality of information it presents, not the drama or the pyrotechnics associated with us." Bob Woodward


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Details

Country:

Australia | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 October 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Truth See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,600,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$66,232, 18 October 2015

Gross USA:

$2,541,854

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$5,383,097
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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